12th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)Edit This Page

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Contents

Brief History

12th Regiment, Virginia Infantry was organized at Norfolk, Virginia, in May, 1861, using the 4th Battalion Virginia Volunteers as its nucleus. Its members were from Petersburg, Richmond, Hicksford, and Norfolk.
Of the 348 engaged at Gettysburg, only four percent were disabled. It surrendered 12 officers and 177 men. The field officers were Colonels Everard M. Feild and David A. Weisiger; Lieutenant Colonels John R. Lewellen and Fielding L. Taylor; and Majors Edgar L. Brockett, Richard W. Jones, and John P. May. [1]

Companies in this Regiment with the Counties of Origin

Men often enlisted in a company recruited in the counties where they lived though not always. After many battles, companies might be combined because so many men were killed or wounded. However if you are unsure which company your ancestor was in, try the company recruited in his county first.

Company A (Petersburg City Guard) - many men from Petersburg, Virginia

Company B ( Petersburg Old Grays) - many men from Petersburg, Virginia

Company C (Petersburg New Grays) - many men from Petersburg, Virginia

Company D (Lafayette Guards) - many men from Petersburg, Virginia

Company E (Petersburg Riflemen) - many men from Petersburg, Virginia

Company F (Huger Grays) - many men from Greensville and Brunswick Counties

Company G (Richmond Grays) (formerly Company A of the 1st Virginia

Company H (Norfolk Juniors) - many men from Norfolk, Virginia

Company  I (Meherrin Grays) - many men from Greensville and Brunswick Counties

Company K (Archer Rifles) many men from Petersburg, Virginia

The information above is from 12th Virginia Infantry, by William D. Henderson

Other Sources

  • Beginning United States Civil War Research gives steps for finding information about a Civil War soldier or sailor. It covers the major records that should be used. Additional records are described in Virginia in the Civil War and United States Civil War, 1861 to 1865 (see below).
  • National Park Service, The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System, is searchable by soldier's name and state. It contains basic facts about soldiers on both sides of the Civil War, a list of regiments, descriptions of significant battles, sources of the information, and suggestions for where to find additional information.
  • Virginia in the Civil War describes many Confederate and Union sources, specifically for Virginia, and how to find them.. These include compiled service records, pension records, rosters, cemetery records, Internet databases, published books, etc.
  • United States Civil War, 1861 to 1865 describes and explains United States and Confederate States records, rather than state records, and how to find them. These include veterans’ censuses, compiled service records, pension records, rosters, cemetery records, Internet databases, published books, etc.
  • Bernard, George S. The Battle of the Crater in Front of Petersburg, July 30, 1864, A Memorable Day in History: An Address Delivered before the A.P. Hill Camp of Confederate Veterans, Petersburg, Va., in that City, on the 24th of June 1890. Petersburg, Va.: Petersburg Index-Appeal Presses, 1890. FHL Fiche 6082843 and War Talks of Confederate Veterans, the Battle of the Crater: Address Delivered Before A.P. Hill Camp of Confederate Veterans, of Petersburg, Va., with Addenda Giving Statements of Participants, Eye-witnesses and Others, in Respect to Campaigns, Battles, Prison Life, and Other War Experiences. Petersburg, Va.: Fenn and Owen, 1892. FHL Fiche 6082844.
  • Grand Army of the Republic. John A. Andrew Post, No. 15 (Boston, Mass.). The Old Stars and Stripes of the Richmond Grays, and the Grays in the Confederate Army. 1887?. FHL Fiche 6082846.
  • Keiley, A.M. Prisoner of War, or, Five Months Among the Yankees: Being a Narrative of the Crosses, Calamities, and Consolations of a Petersburg Militiaman During an Enforced Summer Residence North. (West & Johnson, 1865?), Digital version at Internet Archive; (Bethesda, Maryland : University Publications of America, c1990), FHL Fiche 6082848 (2 fiche) and In Vinculis, or, The Prisoner of War: Being the Experience of a Rebel in Two Federal Pens, Interspersed with Reminiscences of the Late War, Anecdotes of Southern Generals, etc. (New York: Blelock & Co., 1866), Digital version at Internet Archive; FHL Fiche 6082847 (3 fiche)and (Washington, District of Columbia : Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service, 1984) FHL Film 1486493.
  • Turner, John R. The Battle of the Wilderness: The Part Taken by Mahone's Brigade: An Address Delivered by John R. Turner Before A.P. Hill Camp of Confederate Veterans of Petersburg, Va., on the Evening of March 3, 1892. Petersburg, Va.: Fenn & Owen, Printers and Binders, 1892? FHL Fiche 6082849.

References

  1. National Park Service, The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System, (accessed 6 December 2010).

 

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  • This page was last modified on 23 July 2014, at 20:06.
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