California, Alameda County, Land Records (FamilySearch Historical Records)Edit This Page

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FamilySearch Record Search This article describes a collection of historical records scheduled to become available at FamilySearch.org.

Contents

Record Description

This collection contains deed records and indexes that are located at the Clerk-Recorder Offices in Oakland.

You will be able to browse through images in this collection when it is published.

Record Content

The records generally include:

  • Name of buyer
  • Name of seller
  • Name of spouse, heirs, other relatives, or neighbors
  • Place of residence at time of purchase
  • Occupation
  • Transaction dates
  • Amounts of monies exchanged, paid or assessed

How to Use the Record

To begin your search, it would be helpful if you knew the following information:

  • Name of ancestor
  • Other identifying information such as the transaction date or place of residence before purchase

Search the Collection

To search the collection:
⇒ Select the "Browse" link in the initial search page
⇒ Select the "County "
⇒ Select the "Record Type, Volume, and Date Range" which will take you to the images.

Look at each image comparing the information with what you already know about your ancestors to determine if the image relates to them. You may need to look at several images and compare the information about the individuals listed in those images to your ancestors to make this determination. Keep in mind:

  • There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
  • You may not be sure of your own ancestor’s name.
  • Your ancestor may have used different names or variations of their name throughout their life.

Using the Information

When you have located your ancestor’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. Save a copy of the image or transcribe the information. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details such as a title or an occupation. Add this new information to your records of each family. These records may offer clues such as the given name of a spouse, a previous residence, names of children, or death information.

Tips to Keep in Mind

  • Land records may offer clues to maiden names if a father deeded property to his daughter upon marriage.
  • Witnesses and neighbors may be in-laws or relatives.
  • It is important to trace the purchase and sale (or the acquisition and disposition) of each parcel of land your ancestor owned.
  • Once a parcel of land was transferred from government to private ownership, it may have stayed in the family for generations or for only a few months. It may have been subdivided, sold, and resold, with each transaction requiring new records.

Unable to Find Your Ancestor?

  • Look for variant spellings of the surnames.
  • Look for an index. There are often indexes at the beginning of each volume. Local genealogical and historical societies often have indexes to local records.
  • Search the indexes and records of nearby counties.

General Information About These Records

Land records are primarily used to learn where an individual lived and when he or she lived there. They often reveal other family information, such as the name of a spouse, heir, other relatives, or neighbors. They may also include information about previous residences, occupations, military service, citizenship, and so forth.

Most of the states in the United States are public domain states, which means the federal government controls the land. In state-land states, however, the state government appropriates all land within its borders.

Related Websites

Alameda County Online Records

Related Wiki Articles

California Land and Property

Contributions to This Article

We welcome user additions to FamilySearch Historical Records wiki articles. Guidelines are available to help you make changes. Thank you for any contributions you may provide. If you would like to get more involved join the WikiProject FamilySearch Records.

Citations for this Collection

When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information; that is, cite your sources. This will help people find the record again and evaluate the reliability of the source. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records. Citations are available for the collection as a whole and each record or image individually.

Collection Citation:

"California, Alameda County, Land Records, 1853-1920." Images. FamilySearch. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2014. Citing Clerk-Recorder Offices. Administration Building, Oakland.

Image Citation

The citation for an image will be available on each image once the collection is published.

 

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  • This page was last modified on 10 November 2014, at 22:42.
  • This page has been accessed 1,098 times.