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Our web site contains a small fraction of the original records and information available to researchers. FamilySearch consists of three types of records:

1. Information submitted to us by patrons: This includes such records as the Ancestral File and the Pedigree Resource File.

a. The Ancestral File was our first attempt to create a way for families to submit family history information. Then, with other submitted family information, link their ancestors to other family groups, finding common ancestors. The Ancestral File was discontinued in 2003.
b. The Pedigree Resource File began in 1999. The information in this file cannot be
changed. Updates and new family information can be added to this file by sending a new
submission through the “share” process.

2. Information extracted from civil and church records.
a. Civil records of many types have been extracted from a wide variety of areas (state,
county, city).
b. The International Genealogical Index (IGI) is a database that contains primarily births/
christenings, although in a few cases, deaths or other events appear on the records.
c. Many religions have allowed us to extract records from their holdings. These
records usually pre-date civil records.

3. United States Government records.
a. 1880 Federal Census records have been transcripted and indexed.
b. The Social Security Death Index (SSDI). This database contains some vital record information since 1962. It was compiled by the Social Security Records Administration and we have permission to add it to our site.

If your family does not appear on our Web site it is because:
1. No one has submitted your family information to us.
2. Your ancestors did not live in an area where the records have been extracted.
3. Your family members are still living. Living people do not appear on our site.


 

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  • This page was last modified on 12 March 2009, at 21:57.
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