Copake, New YorkEdit This Page

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United StatesGotoarrow.png New YorkGotoarrow.png Columbia CountyGotoarrow.png Town of Copake

Contents

Resources

Church Records

History

Additional Resources:

USGenNet - Columbia County

Genealogical Resources: A brief history for Copake, Columbia County, New York by Capt. Franklin Ellis, 1878.

Migration

NY MA CT.png
Migration routes for early European settlers to and from Copake, New York included:[1]

Military

Civil War

USGenNet - Columbia County

Genealogical Resources: A list of men from the Town of Copake that served in the Civil War. This is based on the 1878 history by Captain Franklin Ellis.

Repositories

Archives, Libraries and Museums

The town of Copake does not have a library but check out the Mid-Hudson Library System, of which Columbia County is a part of, to locate the towns close to Copake that have public libraries.

Hudson Area Library
400 State Street
Hudson, New York 12534
Phone: 518-828-1792
Fax: 518-822-0567

Genealogical Resources: Historical information of the city, county and state, city directories, High School yearbooks, historical periodicals, photographs. History Room

Museum

Roeliff Jansen Historical Society Museum
8 Miles Road
Next to the Copake Falls Post Office
Copake Falls, NY 12517
Phone: 518-329-0652

Societies

Roeliff Jansen Historical Society
Janet Doherty
P. O. Box 172
Copake Falls, NY 12517
Phone: (518) 329-2376
Collections

Columbia County Historical Society
c/o Columbia County Museum & Library
5 Albany Avenue
PO Box 311
Kinderhook, NY 12106
Phone: 518-758-9265
E-mail: cchs@cchsny.org

Town Clerk

Town of Copake, Clerk
230 Mountain View Road
Copake, New York 12516
Phone: 518-329-1234 ext. 2
Fax: 518-329-4049
E-mail: townofcopake@taconic.net

Town Historian

Gloria Lyons, Historian
3285 County Route 7
Hillsdale, New York 12529
Phone: (518) 325-5877
glorybee3285@yahoo.com

Town Records

To locate additional published and transcribed records for Copake, New York check:

  • Gordon L. Remington, New York Towns, Villages, and Cities: A Guide to Genealogical Sources (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2002). American Ancestors online edition; At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 974.7 D27r. Alphabetical list including date founded, if a town history exists, church and cemetery sources, and if a Civil War register (TCR) exists. The codes used under Church and Cemetery are defined in the link above the listing of towns, cities and villages.


Vital Records

References

  1. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), 847-61. WorldCat entry; FHL Book 973 D27e 2002.
  2. Wikipedia contributors, "Old Albany Post Road" in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Albany_Post_Road (accessed 23 June 2011).
  3. Frederic J. Wood, The Turnpikes of New England and the Evolution of the Same Through England, Virginia, and Maryland (Boston: Marshall Jones, 1919), map between 56 and 57, and 168. Internet Archive version online.
  4. Isaac Huntting, History of the Little Nine Partners of North East Precinct and Pine Plains, New York, Dutchess County (Amenia, NY: Chas. Walsh, 1897), 99-101. Google Book edition.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 List of turnpikes in New York in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia (accessed 6 November 2014).
  6. Ancram Turnpike in Routes in the Northeastern United States: Historic Trails, Roads and Migration Routes (accessed 6 November 2014). The Ancram Turnpike went from Springield, MA to Catskill, NY; and was called the Catskill Road.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Almira E Morgan, The Catskill Turnpike: A Wilderness Path (Ithaca, N.Y.: DeWitt Historical Society of Thompkins County, 1971), 5. Online digital copy.
  8. Catskill Turnpike in Routes in the Northeastern United States: Historic Trails, Roads and Migration Routes (accessed 6 November 2014). The Catskill Turnpike went west from Catskill, NY to Bath, NY; the east part was called the Susquehanna Turnpike.
  9. Huntting, 97-99.
  10. Anastassia Zinke, The Susquehanna Turnpike and America's Frontier History in Catskill Mountain Foundation (accessed 1 November 2014).
  11. Joan Odess, The Susquehanna Turnpike (pdf accessed 1 November 2014).
  12. Wood, map between 56 and 57, and 186-88.
  13. Wood, map between 330 and 331, and 348-49.
  14. Wood, map between 56 and 57, and 203-205.
  15. Wood, map between 56 and 57, and 166-67.
  16. Wood, map between 56 and 57, and 76-78.
  17. Wood, map between 56 and 57, and 79-80.
  18. Handybook, 851.
  19. Bethlehem Pike in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia (accessed 17 November 2014).
  20. Wood, map between 330 and 331, and 363-64.

Places


 

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  • This page was last modified on 17 November 2014, at 20:58.
  • This page has been accessed 1,765 times.