FamilySearch Wiki:WikiProject FamilySearch Records/How to Help with Image TranslationsEdit This Page

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Images of records in a language other than English need translated callouts (in English) added to the images. Callouts are also referred to as text/speech bubbles/balloons. These callouts draw attention to the genealogical data within the record. Therefore, only genealogical data from the record need callouts. Using callouts is the simplest way to translate images (and understand translated images), as you can see in this sample image:
Italy Agrigento Tribunale di Agrigento Civil Registration (11-0751) (12-1302) (12-1303) (12-1304) Birth Record DGS 4125541 40.jpg

The following instructions will describe how to find an image that needs callouts in the wiki and save the image to your computer, the guidelines for adding callouts, and the programs you can use with links to how-to-add-callouts guides for each program.

Contents

Finding and Saving the Image

For a list of all articles with sample images currently needing translations see articles needing image translations.

  1. You'll first need to save the image to your computer. From the article, click on the image that needs callouts.
    Note: Clicking on the image takes you to that image file’s wiki page. This is the page where the image was first uploaded. Example of an image file wiki page.

  2. Click on the image once more; doing this will take you to a new web page that shows only the image.

    ImageTranslations2.png
  3. Right-click on the image; a list will appear. (See the image to the right.)

  4. Select “Save Image As…” to save the image to your computer.
    Note: You will need to do this in order to open it in Word, Publisher, Photoshop, or any other image editing program to add callouts.


  5. Save the image to a location on your computer where you will easily locate it later. Use the exact same file name as the one that is already provided for that image.
    ImageTranslations3.png

Choose a Program

There are several image editing programs to choose from when you want to add callouts to images. Some of the ones we use are Microsoft Word, Microsoft Publisher, and Adobe Photoshop. Either of these programs cost money if you do not already have them. If you don’t want to buy the programs, then there is a free program available to download called Apache OpenOffice. Find out more about it here: OpenOffice.org.

After you've saved the image onto your computer, open up the program of your choice and go for it. Below are some links to instructional guides about adding callouts using MS Word, MS Publisher, Adobe Photoshop, and OpenOffice Draw:

Callouts Guidelines

Follow these guidelines about callouts (use the image at the top of this wiki page as an example of what they should look like):

  • Use the rounded rectangular call out
  • The outline weight must be at least 1.5 pt and not greater than 2.25 pt
  • The outline weight must be black
  • The background color must be white
  • Use black text
  • Try to keep the callouts off of the text of the record, but you may use the blank spaces of the record. We understand that positioning the callout can sometimes be difficult because the record doesn't give enough space; try your best and send us the finished product.

Submit the Completed Image with Callouts

Note: MS Word does not allow saving or exporting a document with images as an image file.

If you prefer using MS Word: Please send us the document (.doc) file with the image and callouts in place.

If you prefer using MS Publisher, Adobe Photoshop, or OpenOffice Draw: Please send us the image (.jpeg/.jpg) file with the callouts in place as well as the Publisher file (.pub), Draw file (.odg), or Photoshop file (.psd) for that image.

Please email all submissions to userguidance@ldschurch.org.

Thanks

Your contribution will be a great benefit to those searching for their ancestors without the language skills necessary to read the records. Thank you for your help!

  • This page was last modified on 21 November 2014, at 18:12.
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