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Confederate

Contents

1st Units

  • 1st Battalion, Virginia Reserves (Confederate)
    1st Battalion Reserves was organized during May, 1864, with nine companies.
    During the Appomattox Campaign many of its members were captured at Sayler's Creek.
    Lieutenant Colonel Richard T. W. Duke and Major James M. Strange were in command.
  • 1st Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Completed its organization at Winchester, Virginia, in July, 1861.
    September, 1864 the cavalry cut through the Federal lines at Appomattox and later disbanded. The field officers were Colonels R. Welby Carter, James H. Drake, William E. Jones, Fitzhugh Lee, William A. Morgan, and James E.B. Stuart; Lieutenant Colonels L. Tiernan Brien and Charles R. Irving; and Major Robert Swan.
  • 1st Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Williams Rifles) (Confederate)
    Completed its organization at Richmond, Virginia, in May, 1861.
    Only 17 surrendered on April 9, 1865.The field officers were Colonels Patrick T. Moore, F.G. Skinner, and Lewis B. Williams; Lieutenant Colonels William H. Fry and Frank H. Langley; and Majors John Dooley, William P. Mumford, George F. Norton, and William H. Palmer.

2nd and 3rd Units

  • 2nd Battalion, Virginia Reserves (Confederate)
    Organized in July, 1864,During December the unit was transferred to General P.T. Moore's command. Most of its members were captured at Sayler's Creek on April 6. Lieutenant Colonel John H. Guy and Major Edward B. Cook were in command.
  • 2nd Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Completed its organization at Lynchburg, Virginia, in May, 1861. At Appomattox it cut through the Federal lines and disbanded at Lynchburg on April 10, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Thomas T. Munford and Richard C.W. Radford, Lieutenant Colonels Cary Breckinridge and James W. Watts, and Major William F. Graves.
  • 2nd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Assembled at Charles Town in April,1861. The unit was accepted into Confederate service in July. Its companies were from the counties of Clarke, Frederick, Floyd, Jefferson, and Berkeley. It became part of the Stonewall Brigade and served under Generals T.J. Jackson, R.B. Garnett, Winder, Paxton, J.A. Walker, and W. Terry.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 9 officers and 62 men. Its field officers were Colonels James W. Allen, Lawson Botts, and John Q.A. Nadenbousch; Lieutenant Colonels Raleigh T. Colston, Francis Lackland, and William W. Randolph; and Majors Francis B. Jones, Edwin L. Moore, and Charles H. Stewart.
  • 3rd Battalion, Virginia Reserves (Archer's) (Confederate)
    Organized at Petersburg, Virginia, in June, 1864. It served in the Petersburg area, then in January, 1865.
    On April 9, the battalion surrendered. Lieutenant Colonels F.H. Archer and W.H. Hood, and Majors Thomas H. Bond and William H. Jarvis were in command.
  • 3rd Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Organized with independent companies and entered Confederate service on July 1, 1861.
    It surrendered on April 9, 1865. Its commanders were Colonels Thomas F. Goode, Robert Johnston, and Thomas H. Owen; Lieutenant Colonels William R. Carter, William M. Feild, and John T. Thornton; and Majors Henry Carrington and Jefferson C. Phillips.
  • 3rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Organized at Portsmouth, Virginia, in 1856 with volunteer companies attached to the 7th Regiment Virginia Militia. It entered Confederate service during July, 1861. Its members were from Portsmouth and Petersburg, and the counties of Nansemond, Dinwiddie, Surry, Isle of Wright, Southampton, and Halifax.
    It surrendered in April, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Joseph Mayo, Jr. and Roger A. Pryor; and Lieutenant Colonels Alexander D. Callcote, William H. Pryor, and Joseph V. Scott
  • 3rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry, Local Defense (Henley's) (McAnerney's) (Confederate)
    Was organized in September, 1864 from the 3rd (Departmental) Infantry Battalion Local Defense Troops. Its members were from the War Department, Post Office Department, Treasury Department, Quartermaster Department, Medical Purveyor's Department, and men under the age of eighteen.
    At Sayler's Creek many were captured and only 1 man surrendered at Appomattox. The field officers were Colonel John McAnerney; Lieutenant Colonel S.F. Sutherland; and Majors Bolling Baker, John A. Henley, and S.G. Jamison.

4th and 5th Units

  • 4th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Completed its organization at Sangster's Cross Roads, Prince William County, Virginia, in September, 1861. Its members were recruited in the counties of Prince William, Chesterfield, Madison, Culpeper, Powhatan, Gouchland, Hanover, Fauquier, Buckingham, and the city of Richmond.
    After cutting through the Federal lines at Appomattox, it was broken up. Only 2 members were present at the surrender.
    The field officers were Colonels Stephen D. Lee, William H. Payne, Beverly H. Robertson, William C. Wickham, and W.B. Wooldridge; Lieutenant Colonels Charles Old and Robert Randolph; and Majors Alexander M. Hobson and Robert E. Utterback.
  • 4th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Assembled at Winchester, Virginia, in July, 1861. Its companies were from the counties of Wythe, Montgomery, Pulaski, Smyth, Grayson, and Rockbridge. It became part of the Stonewall Brigade and served under Generals T.J. Jackson, T.B. Garnett, Winder, Paxton, J.A. Walker, and W. Terry.
    The regiment surrendered with 7 officers and 38 men of which only 17 were armed. Its field officers were Colonels James T. Preston, Charles A. Ronald, and William Terry; Lieutenant Colonels Robert D. Gardner and Lewis T. Moore; and Majors Matthew D. Bennett, Joseph F. Kent, and Albert G. Pendleton.
  • 5th Battalion, Virginia Infantry (Wilson's)(Archer's)(Confederate)
    5th Infantry Battalion completed its organization at Richmond, Virginia, in May, 1861. Its six companies were raised in the counties of Brunswick, Dinwiddie, Prince George, Henrico, and Greensville.
    During June, 1862, it was active in the Seven Days' Battles, then disbanded in September. Many of its members transferred to the 53rd Regiment Virginia Infantry.
  • 5th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    5th Cavalry Regiment was organized in June, 1862, using the 2nd Battalion Virginia Cavalry as its nucleus. The men were from Petersburg and Fairfax, Gloucester, King and Queen, Mathews, Randolph, and James City counties. On November 8, 1864, it was consolidated with the 15th Virginia Cavalry Regiment and redesignated the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry Consolidated.
    Only 150 men were engaged at Gettysburg and 2 surrendered at Appomattox as most cut through the Federal lines and disbanded.
    Predecessor Unit:
    2nd Cavalry Battalion was formed in May, 1862, with six companies and appears to have been a command of scouts. A month later four companies were added and the unit became the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. Lieutenant Colonel H. Clay Pate was in command
  • 5th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (12 months, 1861-62) (Mullins') (Confederate)
    5th Cavalry Regiment, Provisional Army was organized near Norfolk, Virginia, in July, 1861. The men were recruited at Petersburg and in the counties of Princess Anne, Sussex, Surry, Prince George, Nansemond, and Southampton. It served in the Department of Norfolk until May, 1862, when three companies were assigned to the 14th Battalion and seven companies merged into the 16th Battalion Virginia Cavalry.
    . Majors Benjamin Allston and John Mullins were in command.
  • 5th Consolidated Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Formed in May, 1862, with six companies and appears to have been a command of scouts. A month later four companies were added and the unit became the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry.
    Lieutenant Colonel H. Clay Pate was in command.
  • 5th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Organized in May, 1861, under Colonel K. Harper. Eight companies were from Augusta County and two from Frederick County. The unit became part of the Stonewall Brigade and served undder Generals T.J. Jackson, R.B. Garnett, Winder, Paxton, J.A. Walker, and W. Terry.
    It surrendered 8 officers and 48 men. The field officers were Colonels William S.H. Baylor, John H.S. Funk, William H. Harman, and Kenton Harper; Lieutenant Colonel Hazel J. Williams; and Majors Absalom Koiner and James W. Newton.

6th - 10th Units

  • 6th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Completed its organization in November, 1861, at Manassas, Virginia. Men of this unit were raised in Loudoun, Rappahannock, Clarke, Rockingham, Pittsylvania, Fairfax, Halifax, Fauquier, and Orange counties.
    Only 3 men surrendered on April 9, 1865, as most of the cavalry cut through the Federal lines and later disbanded. The field officers were Colonels Charles W. Field, Thomas S. Flourney, John S. Green, and Julien Harrison; Lieutenant Colonels J. Grattan Cabell and Daniel T. Richards; and Majors Cabell E. Flournoy and Daniel A. Grimsley.
  • 6th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Was organized at Norfolk, Virginia, in May, 1861, recruited its men at Norfolk and in the counties of Princess Anne, Nansemond, and Chesterfield.
    It surrendered 110 officers and men on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Thomas J. Corprew, William Mahone, and George T. Rogers; Lieutenant Colonels William T. Lundy and Henry W. Williamson; and Major Robert B. Taylor.
  • 7th Battalion, Virginia Reserves (Confederate)
    Was organized at Norfolk, Virginia, during the summer of 1861 with eight companies.
    The unit was transferred to the infantry and merged into the 61st Regiment in October, 1862. Lieutenant Colonel Samuel M. Wilson was in command.
  • 7th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Ashby's) (Confederate)
    Was organized during the late spring of 1861. Ten companies formed the 12th Regiment Virginia Cavalry, seven became the 17th Battalion Virginia Cavalry, one transferred to the 14th Regiment Virginia Cavalry, and one became J.W. Carter's Battery.
    Later the regiment was involved in Early's Shenandoah Valley operations and disbanded in mid-April, 1865. None of its members were at Appomattox on April 9. The field officers were Colonels Turner Ashby, Richard H. Dulany, William E. Jones, and A.W. McDonald; Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Marshall; and Majors O.R. Funsten, Daniel C. Harcher, and Samuel B. Myers.
  • 7th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    7th Infantry Regiment was organized in May, 1861, at Manassas Junction, Virginia, with men from Giles, Madison, Rappahannock, Culpeper, Greene, and Albemarle counties.
    Only 20 officers and men were present at the surrender. Its commanders were Colonels Charles C. Flowerree, James L. Kemper, and Waller T. Patton; Lieutenant Colonel L.B. Williams, Jr.; and Major Aylett A. Swindler.
  • 8th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    8th Cavalry Regiment was organized early in 1862 with nine companies but increased its number to eleven to July. Many of the men were recruited in Smyth, Nelson, Kanawha, and Tazewell counties.
    None were included in the surrender at Appomattox because it had cut through the Federal lines and disbanded. The field officers were Colonels James M. Corns and Walter H. Jenifer; Lieutenant Colonels Thomas P. Bowen, A.F. Cook, Henry Fitzhugh, and Albert G. Jenkins; and Major P.M. Edmondson.
  • 8th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    8th Infantry Regiment was organized at Leesburg, Virginia, in May, 1861. Its members were recruited in the counties of Loudoun, Prince William, and Fairfax. The unit was also called "Old Bloody Eighth" and from time to time "The Berkeley Regiment".
    Only 1 surgeon and 11 privates surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Norborne Berkeley and Eppa Hunton, Lieutenant Colonels Edmund Berkeley and Charles B. Tebbs, and Majors William N. Berkeley and James Thrift.
  • 9th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Johnson's) (Confederate)
    9th Cavalry Regiment was formed in January, 1862, using the 1st Battalion Virginia Cavalry as its nucleus. Its companies were from the counties of Stafford, Caroline, Westmoreland, Lancaster, Essex, Spotsylvania, Lunenburg, King William, King George, and Richmond.
    It surrendered 1 officer and 26 men. The field officers were Colonels Richard L.T. Beale, John E. Johnson, William H.F. Lee, and Thomas Waller; Lieutenant Colonel Meriwether Lewis; and Major Samuel A. Swann.
  • 9th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    9th Infantry Regiment completed its organization at Portsmouth, Virginia, in July, 1861. Its members were from Portsmouth and the counties of Roanoke, Chesterfield, Isle of Wight, Nansemond, Lunenburg, Dinwiddie, and Norfolk.
    Many were captured at Five Forks and Sayler's Creek, and surrendered 2 officers and 37 men on April 9, 1865. Its field officers were Colonels David J. Godwin, James J. Phillips, and Francis H. Smith; Lieutenant Colonels James S. Gilliam, John T.L. Preston, and William J. Richardson; and Majors Stapleton Crutchfield, Makr B. Hardin, and John C. Owens.
  • 10th Battalion, Virginia Heavy Artillery (Allen's) (Confederate)
    Was organized at Richmond, Virginia, in April, 1862, with five companies. The unit served in the Department of Richmond until 1865 when it was transferred as infantry to the Army of Northern Virginia. Majors William Allen and James O. Hensley were in command.
    Associated unit:
    Brandon Light Artillery completed its organization in May, 1861 and became Company E of the 1st Regiment Virginia Artillery. It was detached in December and assigned to J.R.C. Lewis' Battalion, a temporary field command. Later the unit became Company D, 10th Battalion Virginia Heavy Artillery and was then known as the Jamestown Heavy Artillery.Its commander was Captain William Allen
  • 10th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (1st Cavalry Regiment, Wise Legion) (Confederate)
    Formerly called 1st Cavalry Regiment, Wise Legion, and 8th Battalion,
    Organized in May, 1862. Many of the men were from Richmond and Albermarle, Rockingham, and Henrico counties.
    It took 236 effectives to Gettysburg and surrendered with 3 officers and 19 men. Its commanders were Colonels Robert A. Caskie, William B. Clement, and J. Lucius Davis; Lieutenant Colonel Zachariah S. McGruder; and Major J.
  • 10th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Was assembled at Harper's Ferry during the late spring of 1861. Four companies of the 4th Regiment Virginia Volunteers, a militia unit, were united with other volunteer companies to make up the regiment. An eleventh company was added to the command in April, 1862. Its men were raised in the counties of Shenandoah, Rockingham, Page, and Madison.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 2 officers and 43 men. The field officers wer Colonels Simeon B. Gibbons and Edward T.H. Warren, Lieutenant Colonels Dorilas H.L. Martz and Samuel T. Walker, and Majors Isaac G. Coffman and Joshua Stover.


Units 11th - 15th

  • 11th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Was organized in February, 1863, by consolidating the 17th Battalion Virginia Cavalry, one company from the 24th Battalion Virginia Cavalry, and two companies of the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry, and two companies of the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry.
    It then disbanded as there were no members of the 11th at Appomattox. The field officers were Colonels Oliver R. Funsten and Lunsford L. Lomax, Lieutenant Colonel Matt D. Ball, and Majors William H. Harness and Edward H. McDonald.
    Predecessor unit:
    17th Cavalry Battalion [also called 1st Battalion] was organized in June, 1862, with seven companies. During February, 1863, it merged into the 11th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. Lieutenant Colonel Oliver R. Funsten and Major William Patrick were in command.
  • 11th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Was organized at Lynchburg, Virginia, in May, 1861, and accepted into Confederate service in July. Its members were raised in the counties of Campbell, Botetourt, Montgomery, Fauquier, Culpeper, and Rockbridge.
    Many were captured at Sayler's Creek, and only 1 officer and 28 men surrendered. The field officers were Colonels David Funsten, Samuel Garland, Jr., Maurice S. Langhorne, and Kirkwood Otey; and Majors Adam Clement, Carter H. Harrison, and J.R. Hutter.
  • 12th Battalion, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Organized with four companies during May, 1862. Because the companies did not always serve together, the history of each is given under its own designation. They are: Company A (1st) - Brooke's Battery; Company A (2nd) - Sturdivant's Battery; Company B - Martin's Battery; Company C - Eubank's-Taylor's Battery; and Company D - Harrington Light Artillery (assigned to the 13th North Carolina Artillery Battalion in November, 1863.) Major Francis J. Boggs was in command.
    Associated unit:
    Martin's Battery was organized in April, 1862, with men from North Carolina and Virginia. For a time it was attached to the 12th Battalion Virginia Artillery. Later the men from North Carolina were transferred to the 13th North Carolina Artillery Battalion. Richmond. Captain S. Taylor Martin was in command.
  • 12th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Was organized at Conrad's Store, Virginia, in June, 1862, with companies from the 7th Regiment Virginia Cavalry, (also called 10th Regiment).
    During mid-April, 1865, it disbanded. The field officers were Colonel Asher W. Harman, Lieutenant Colonels Richard H. Burks and Thomas B. Massie, and Major John L. Knott.
  • 12th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Was organized at Norfolk, Virginia, in May, 1861, using the 4th Battalion Virginia Volunteers as its nucleus. Its members were from Petersburg, Richmond, Hicksford, and Norfolk.
    Of the 348 engaged at Gettysburg, only four percent were disabled. It surrendered 12 officers and 177 men. The field officers were Colonels Everard M. Feild and David A. Weisiger; Lieutenant Colonels John R. Lewellen and Fielding L. Taylor; and Majors Edgar L. Brockett, Richard W. Jones, and John P. May.
  • 13th Battalion, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Was formed late in 1863 with three companies. Because the companies did not always served together, the history of each is given under its own designation. They are: Company A - Otey's-Walker's Battery; Company B - Ringgold Light Artillery; and Company C - Davidson's-Chamberlyne's Battery. The field officers were Lieutenant Colonel J. Floyd King, and Majors Wade H. Gibbes and William M. Owen.
    Associated units:
    Ringgold Light Artillery was organized in February, 1862. It was attached to the 13th Battalion Virginia Artillery but for some time operated as an independent command. The battery was then attached to W.H. Gibbes’ Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia, participated in the defense of Petersburg, and ended the war at Appomattox as infantry. Its commanders were Captains Crispin Dickenson and Timothy H. Stamps.
    Davidson's-Chamberlayne's Battery was assembled in April, 1862, with men from Southwestern Virginia, Tennessee, and Kentucky. It was attached to the 13th Battalion Virginia Artillery, but served as an independent command.
    It participated in the defense of Petersburg and Richmond, and disbanded early in 1865. The battery was commanded by Captains John H. Chamberlayne and George S. Davidson.
  • 13th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (12th Months, 1861-62) (Confederate)
    Was formed in July, 1862, using the 16th Battalion Virginia Cavalry as its nucleus. The men were from Petersburg and the counties of Southampton, Sussex, Prince George, Surry, and Nansemond.
    This regiment had 298 men in action in Gettysburg and surrendered on April 9, 1865, with 10 officers and 78 men. The field officers were Colonels John R. Chambliss, Jr. and Jefferson C. Phillips; Lieutenant Colonels Alexander Savage and Thomas H. Upshaw; and Majors Benjamin W. Belsches, Joseph E. Gillette, and Benjamin F. Winfield.
  • 13th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Completed its organization during the summer of 1861 with men from Winchester and Culpeper, Orange, Louisa, and Hampshire counties.
    The unit sustained heavy losses at Cedar Creek and surrendered with 10 officers and 52 men. Its commanders were Colonels George A. Goodman, Ambrose P. Hill, James B. Terrill, and James A. Walker; and Majors Charles T. Crittenden and John B. Sherrard.
  • 14th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry (Burroughs') (Confederate)
    Was organized in May, 1862, with four companies (also called Chesapeake Battalion). It included three companies from the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry, Provisional Army.
    In September it was consolidated with the 15th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. Major Edgar Burroughs was in command.
  • 14th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Organized in September, 1862, with nine companies, some of which had previously served in Jackson's Squadron Virginia Cavalry. The tenth company was made up of surplus men of the other companies.
    Disbanded in April, 1865. The field officers were Colonels James Cochran and Charles E. Thorburn, Lieutenant Colonels Robert A. Bailey and John A. Gibson, and Majors B. Frank Eakle and George Jackson.
  • 14th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Was organized in May, 1861. Its companies were recruited in the counties of Amelia, Bedford, Fluvanna, Chesterfield, Halifax, and Mecklenburg.
    Only 7 officers and 49 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels James G. Hodges and William White; Lieutenant Colonels Moses F.T. Evans, David J. Godwin, Parke Poindexter, and William W. Wood; and Majors Robert H. Poore and William D. Shelton.
  • 15th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    15th Cavalry Regiment was formed in September, 1862, by consolidating the 14th and 15th Battalions Virginia Cavalry. On November 8, 1864, was absorbed by the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. The field officers were Colonels William B. Ball and Charles R. Collins, Lieutenant Colonel John Critcher, and Major Edgar Burroughs
  • 15th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Was organized in May, 1861, with men from Richmond and Henrico and Hanover counties.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 69 officers and men. The field officers were Colonel Thomas P. August; Lieutenant Colonels James R. Crenshaw, Emmett M. Morrison, Thomas G. Peyton, and St. George Tucker; and Majors C.H. Clarke and John S. Walker. .

Units 16th - 19th

  • 16th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    16th Cavalry Regiment was formed at Camp Zirkle, near Salem, Virginia,in January, 1863, by consolidating six companies of Ferguson's Battalion with four companies of O. Caldwell's Battalion.
    It disbanded in April, 1865. The field officers were Colonel Milton J. Ferguson, Lieutenant Colonel William L. Graham, and Major James H. Hounnan.
  • 16th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    16th Infantry Regiment completed its organization in May, 1861, with ten companies. However, because of various reorganizations and transfers, the unit contained only seven after November 1, 1862. The men were from Suffolk and Portsmouth and the counties of Nansemond, Isle of Wight, Sussex, and Chesterfield.
    It surrendered with 10 officers and 114 men. The field officers were Colonels Raleigh E. Colston, Charles A. Crump, Stapleton Crutchfield, Joseph H. Ham, and Henry T. Parrish, Lieutenant Colonels John C. Page and Richard O. Whitehead; and Majors Francis D. Holladay and John T. Woodhouse.
  • 17th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    17th Cavalry Regiment was organized at Salem, Virginia, in January, 1863, by consolidating the 33rd Battalion Virginia Cavalry with three new companies.
    In April, 1865, it disbanded at Lynchburg. The field officers were Colonel William H. French, Lieutenant Colonel William C. Tavenner, and Major Frederick F. Smith
  • 17th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Was organized at Manassas Junction, Virginia, in June, 1861, using the 6th Battalion Virginia Infantry as its nucleus. Men of this unit were recruited in the counties of Warren, Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William, and Fauquier.
    Many were captured at Sayler's Creek, and 2 officers and 46 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Montgomery D. Corse, Arthur Herbert, and Morton Marye; Lieutenant Colonels William Munford and Grayson Tyler; and Majors George W. Brent and Robert H. Simpson.
  • 18th Battalion, Virginia Heavy Artillery (Confederate)
    Was organized in June, 1862, with men from Norfolk and Alexandria, and Southampton, Isle of Wight, and York counties. In April, 1865, the unit was assigned to Barton's Brigade as infantry.
    It surrendered with 2 officers and 23 men. Major Mark B. Hardin was in command.
    Predecessor unit:
    Alexandria Light Artillery was organized in March, 1861, and mustered into Confederate service in April. Was assigned to C.E. Lightfoot's Battalion in the Department of Richmond.
    In January, 1864, the company was dismounted and merged into the 18th Battalion Virginia Heavy Artillery. Captains Delaware Kemper and David L. Smoot were its commanders
  • 18th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    18th Cavalry Regiment was organized in December, 1862. Most of its members had served in the 1st Regiment Virginia Partisan Rangers (subsequently the 62nd Regiment Virginia Infantry).
    It served in the Shenandoah Valley and disbaned during April, 1865. The field officers were Colonel George W. Imboden, Lieutenant Colonel David E. Beall, and Major Alex. Monroe.
  • 18th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    18th Infantry Regiment completed its organization in May, 1861. Its members were recruited at Danville and Farmville, and in the counties of Nottoway, Cumberland, Prince Edward, Appomattox, Pittsylvania, and Charlotte.
    Many were captured at Sayler's Creek and only 2 officers and 32 men surrendered. The field officers were Colonels Henry A. Carrington and Robert E. Withers, Lieutenant Colonel George C. Cabell, and Major Edwin G. Wall.
  • 19th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Was formed in April, 1863, using the 3rd Regiment Virginia State Line as its nucleus.
    Took part in the operations in the Shenandoah Valley and disbanded during April, 1865. Its commanders were Colonel William L. Jackson, Lieutenant Colonel William P. Thompson, and Majors George Downs and Joseph K. Kesler.
  • 19th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    19th Infantry Regiment, organized at Manassas Junction, Virginia, in May, 1861, contained men recruited at Charlottesville and in the counties of Albemarle, Nelson, and Amherst.
    Many were captured at Sayler's Creek, and only 1 officer and 29 men surrendered. The field officers were Colonels P. St. George Cocke, Henry Gantt, Armistead T.M. Rust, and John B. Strange; Lieutenant Colonels John T. Ellis, Charles S. Peyton, and Bennett Taylor; and Majors Waller M. Boyd and William Watts.

Units 20th - 24th

  • 20th Battalion, Virginia Heavy Artillery (Confederate)
    20th Heavy Artillery Battalion was organized and accepted into Confederate service at Drewry's Bluff, Virginia, in June, 1862.
    It participated in the Appomattox Campaign and surrendered with 11 men.
    Majors Johnston DeLagnel and James E. Robertson were in command.
  • 20th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    20th Cavalry Regiment was organized in August, 1863, and was composed of "North Western Virginians." It disbanded in mid-April, 1865.
    The field officers were Colonel W.W. Arnett, Lieutenant Colonels Dudley Evans and John B. Lady, and Major Elihu Hutton.
  • 20th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    20th Infantry Regiment was assembled in July, 1861, with men from Richmond and the counties of Lunenburg, Powhatan, Buckingham, Prince Edward, Halifax, and Brunswick.
    Two companies were captured in the fight at Rich Mountain and in September five companies were disbanded. An unsuccessful attempt was made to reorganize, and later the two companies were assigned to the 59th Virginia Regiment.
    Lieutenant Colonels James R. Crenshaw, John Pegram, and Nathaniel Tyler were in command.
  • 21st Battalion, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    21st Infantry Battalion [also called Pound Gap or Special Service Battalion] was organized during the fall of 1861 with six companies. November, 1862, it merged into the 64th Regiment Virginia Infantry.
    Lieutenant Colonel Campbell Slemp and Major John B. Thompson were in command.
  • 21st Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Organized in August, 1862, with companies which had served in the Virginia State Line.
    During mid-April, 1865, the regiment disbanded.
    Its field officers were Colonel W.E. Peters, Lieutenant Colonel David Edmundson, and Major Stephen P. Halsey.
  • 21st Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Organized in June and mustered into Confederate service in July, 1861, at Fredericksburg, Virginia. Most of the men were recruited in the city of Richmond and the counties of Charlotte, Mecklenburg, Cumberland, and Buckingham.
    Only 6 officers and 50 men surrendered.
    The field officers were Colonels William Gilham, John M. Patton, Jr., and William A. Witcher; Lieutenant Colonels Richard H. Cunningham, Jr., and William P. Moseley; and Majors William R. Berkeley, Alfred D. Kelly, John B. Moseley, and Scott Shipp.
  • 22nd Battalion, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    22nd Infantry Battalion [also called 2nd Battalion] was organized with six companies of the 2nd Regiment Virginia Artillery.
    On December 22,1864, the battalion was disbanded and its members distributed among other Virginia commands.
    The field officers were Lieutenant Colonels James C. Johnson and Edward P. Tayloe, and Major John S. Bowles.
  • 22nd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (1st Kanawha Regiment) (Confederate)
    22nd Infantry Regiment, formerly known as the 1st Kanawha Regiment, was organized and accepted into Confederate service in July, 1861. Its members were from the counties of Jackson, Craig, Nicholas, Alleghany, Wyoming, and Boone.
    It participated in the Shenandoah Valley operations, and disbanded during the spring of 1865.
    The field officers were Colonels George S. Patton and C.Q. Tompkins; Lieutenant Colonels Andrew R. Barbee, William A. Jackson, and John C. McDonald; and Majors Robert A. Bailey and Isaac N. Smith.
  • 23rd Battalion, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Formed in January, 1862, with five companies, later increased to eight.
    In mid-April, 1865, disbanded.
    The field officers were Lieutenant Colonel Clarence Derrick; and Majors William Blessing, William P. Cecil, and David S. Hounshell.
  • 23rd Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Organized in April, 1864, by consolidating seven companies of the 41st Cavalry Battalion and two companies of O'Ferrall's Battalion.
    It disbanded during April, 1865.
    The field officers were Colonel Robert White, Lieutenant Colonel Charles T. O'Ferrall, and Major Fielding H. Calmese.
  • 23rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Completed its organization in May, 1861. Its members were recruited at Richmond and in the counties of Louisa, Amelia, Halifax, Goochland, Prince Edward, and Charlotte.
    It ended the war at Appomattox, surrendered with 8 officers and 49 men.
    The field officers were Colonels Alexander G. Taliaferro and William B. Taliaferro; Lieutenant Colonels Clayton G. Coleman, Jr., James H. Crenshaw, George W. Curtis, John P. Fitzgerald, and Simeon T. Walton; and Majors J.D. Camden, Joseph H. Pendleton, Andrew J. Richardson, and Andrew V. Scott.
  • 24th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Organized in June, 1864, by consolidating eight companies of the 42nd Virginia Cavalry and two companies of Dearing's Confederate Cavalry.
    It was involved in the Appomattox Campaign and surrendered with 19 officers and 144men.
    Predecessor unit:
    42nd Cavalry Battalion was organized in September, 1863, by consolidating the 32nd and 40th Battalions Virginia Cavalry.
    June 1864, it merged into the 24th Regiment Virginia Cavalry.
  • 24th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Assembled in June, 1861, with men from Floyd, Franklin, Carroll, Giles, Pulaski, Mercer, and Henry Counties.
    Many were lost at Sayler's Creek with no officers and 22 men surrendered on April 9, 1865.

Units 25th - 34th

  • 25th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Organized in July, 1864, using the 27th Battalion Virginia Partisan Rangers as its nucleus.
    During April, 1865, it disbanded.
    Its commanders were Colonel Warren M. Hopkins, Lieutenant Colonel Henry A. Edmundson, and Major Sylvester R. McConnell.
  • 25th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Heck's) (Confederate)
    25th Infantry Regiment was organized during the early summer of 1861 and included the four companies of the 9th Battalion Virginia Infantry. Its members were raised in Upshur, Augusta, Highland, Bath, Pendleton, and Rockbridge counties.
    There were no members of the 25th at Appomattox on April 9, 1865.
    The field officers were Colonels John C. Higginbotham, George A. Porterfield, and George H. Smith; Lieutenant Colonels Patrick B. Duffy, Jonathon M. Heck, Robert D. Lilley, and John A. Robinson; and Majors Wilson Harper, Albert G. Reger, and William T. Thompson.
  • 26th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    26th Cavalry Regiment was formed in December, 1864, by consolidating the 46th and 47th Battalions Virginia Cavalry.
    It disbanded during the spring of 1865.
    Lieutenant Colonel Joseph K. Kesler and Major Henry D. Ruffner were in command.
  • 26th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    26th Infantry Regiment was organized during May and June, 1861, with men recruited in the counties of Gloucester, King and Queen, and Mathews. It was transferred to the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.
    Many were captured at Sayler's Creek and on April 9, 1865, there were 15 officers and 81 men present.
    The field officers were Colonels Charles A. Crump and Powhatan R. Page; Lieutenant Colonel James C. Coucill; and Majors Patrick H. Fitzhugh, Joshua L. Garrett, William K. Perrin, and William H. Wheelwright. <br.
  • 27th Battalion Partisan Rangers (Confederate)
    Formed in September, 1862, with seven companies, later increased to nine. In July it merged into the 25th Regiment Virginia Cavalry.
    Lieutenant Colonel Henry A. Edmundson was in command.
  • 27th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    27th Infantry Regiment was organized in May, 1861, and accepted into Confederate service in July. The men were from the counties of Alleghany, Rockbridge, Monroe, Greenbrier, and Ohio. It contained only eight companies and became part of the famous Stonewall Brigade.
    At Gettysburg about thirty percent were disabled. Only 1 officer and 20 men surrendered.
    The field officers were Colonels John Echols, James K. Edmondson, William A. Gordon, and A.J. Grisby; Lieutenant Colonels Charles L. Haynes and Daniel M. Shriver; and Majors Philip F. Frazer and Elisha F. Paxton.
  • 28th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    28th Infantry Regiment completed its organization at Lynchburg, Virginia, in June, 1861. Its members were raised in the counties of Botetourt, Craig, Bedford, Campbell, and Roanoke.
    Many were captured at Sayler's Creek, and 3 officers and 51 men surrendered on April 9, 1865.
    The field officers were Colonels Robert C. Allen, Robert T. Preston, and William Watts; Lieutenant Colonels Samuel B. Paul and William L. Wingfield; and Majors Michael P. Spesard and Nathaniel C. Wilson.
  • 29th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    29th Infantry Regiment was authorized in November, 1861, However, this organization never took place.
    Moore's five companies from Abingdon and companies raised in the spring of 1862 evidently made up the nine-company regiment.
    Many were lost at Sayler's Creek, and only 1 officer and 27 men surrendered on April 9, 1865.
    The field officers were Colonels James Giles and Alfred C. Moore; Lieutenant Colonels Alexander Haynes, William Leigh, and Edwin R. Smith; and Majors Ebenezer Bruster, William R.B. Horne, and Isaac White.
  • 30th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    30th Infantry Regiment completed its organization at Fredericksburg, Virginia, in June, 1861. Men of this unit were from Fredericksburg and the counties of Spotsylvania, Caroline, Stafford, and King George.
    Many were lost at Five Forks and Sayler's Creek, and on April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 8 officers and 82 men.
    The field officers were Colonels R.M. Cary and Robert S. Chew, Lieutenant Colonels John M. Gouldin and Archibald T. Harrison, and Majors William S. Barton and Robert O. Peatross.
  • 31st Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    31st Infantry Regiment was organized under W.L. Jackson and mustered into Confederate service in July, 1861. Many of its members were raised in Marion, Pendleton, and Gilmer counties.
    At Gettysburg, ten percent were disabled. On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 7 officers and 49 men of which 22 were armed.
    The field officers were Colonels John S. Hoffman, William L. Jackson, and Samuel H. Reynolds; Lieutenant Colonels Francis M. Boykin, Alfred H. Jackson, and J.S. Kerr McCutchen; and Majors James C. Arbogast, Joseph H. Chenoweth, and William P. Cooper.
  • 32nd Battalion, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    32nd Cavalry Battalion was organized in November, 1862, with two companies. The unit served in the Department of Richmond until September, 1863, when it merged into the 42nd Battalion Virginia Cavalry.
    Major John R. Robertson was in command.
  • 32nd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    32nd Infantry Regiment was formed in May, 1861, by consolidating Montague's and Goggin's Infantry Battalions. Its members were from Hampton and Williamsburg and the counties of Warwick, James City, and York.
    Ended the war at Appomattox, some were captured at Sayler's Creek, and 5 officers and 42 men were included in the surrender.
    The field officers were Colonels Benjamin S. Ewell and Edgar B. Montague; Lieutenant Colonels John B. Cary and William R. Willis; and Majors James M. Coggin, Baker P. Lee, Jr., and Jefferson Sinclair.
  • 33rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    33rd Infantry Regiment was organized during the early summer of 1861 with men from the counties of Hampshire, Shenandoah, Frederick, Hardy, Page, and Rockingham. It became part of the Stonewall Brigade and served under T.J. Jackson, R.B. Garnett, Winder, Paxton, J.A. Walker, and W. Terry.
    Twenty-three percent of the 236 at Gettysburg were killed, wounded, or missing. Only 1 officer and 18 men surrendered.
    The field officers were Colonels Arthur C. Cummings, Frederick W.M. Holliday, Edwin G. Lee, John F. Neff, and Abraham Spengler; Lieutenant Colonels George Huston and John R. Jones; and Majors Jacob B. Golladay and Philip T. Grace
  • 34th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry (Witcher's Battalion, Virginia Mounted Rifles) (Confederate)
    34th Cavalry Battalion, formerly the 1st Battalion Virginia Mounted Rifles, was organized in December, 1862. The unit served in A.G. Jenkins', W.E. Jones', V.A. Witcher's, and B.T. Johnson's Brigade and first engaged the Federals in western Virginia.
    The 34th disbanded at Lynchburg in April, 1865.
    Lieutenant Colonel Vinson A. Witcher, and Majors John A. McFarlane and William Straton were in command.
  • 34th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    34th Infantry Regiment was organized in May, 1862, with men from Norfolk, Richmond, and Yorktown, and the counties of Gloucester, Mecklenburg, Bedford, Greene, and King and Queen. For almost two years the unit served as heavy artillery attached to the Department of Richmond and was known as the 4th Heavy Artillery. In May, 1864, it was assigned to Wise's Brigade as infantry. It contained 466 effectives in June, 1862, and surrendered 1 officers and 210 men.
    The field officers were Colonel John T. Goode, Lieutenant Colonel Randolph Harrison, and Major John R. Bagby.
    Predecessor unit:
    4th Heavy Artillery Regiment was formed in May, 1862, to serve either as artillery or infantry. On May 23, it was assigned to duty as infantry. Later the unit served as heavy artillery and during March, 1864, became the 34th Regiment Virginia Infantry.
    The field officers were Colonel John T. Goode, Lieutenant Colonel Randolph Harrison, and Majors John R. Bagby and J. Wickham Leigh.

Units 35th - 39th

  • 35th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    35th Cavalry Battalion was organized in Janaury, 1862, by adding companies to E.V. White's Cavalry Company. Containing six companies, it was assigned to W.E. Jones', Rosser's, and J. Dearing's Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia.
    Later it was active in the Shenandoah Valley and disbanded during April, 1865. Lieutenant Colonel Elijah V. White, and Majors George M. Ferneyhough and Franklin M. Myers were in command.
  • 35th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    35th Infantry Regiment was formed during the summer of 1861 and served in the Army of Northwestern Virginia. However, no rolls or roster of the 35th are known to exist. The unit's organization was never completed. Its field officers were Colonel Alfred Beckley, Lieutenant Colonel W.L. Jackson, and Major P.B. Adams.
  • 36th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    36th Cavalry Battalion was organized in February, 1863, with four companies, later increased to five. The unit was assigned to A.G. Jenkins', W.E. Jones', B.T. Johnson's, and Payne's Brigade.
    After cutting through the lines at Appomattox, it disbanded. Major James W. Sweeney was in command.
  • 36th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (2nd Kanawha Infantry) (Confederate)
    36th Infantry Regiment, formerly known as the 2nd Kanawha Regiment, was organized in July, 1861. Assigned to Floyd's Brigade.
    Mid-April, 1865, it disbanded. The field officers were Colonels John A. McCausland and Thomas Smith, and Lieutenant Colonels William E. Fife, Benjamin R. Linkons, and L. Wilber Reid.
  • 37th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    37th Infantry Regiment was organized in Washington County, Virginia, in May, 1861, and accepted in Confederate service in July.
    Many were captured at Spotsylvania. Only 2 officers and 39 men surrendered. The field officers were Colonels Samuel V. Fulkerson and Titus V. Williams, Lieutenant Colonels Robert P. Carson and John F. Terry, and Major Henry C. Wood.
  • 38th Battalion, Virginia Light Artillery (Read's) (Confederate)
    38th Artillery Battalion contained four companies and was organized in June, 1863. The unit did not serve as one command but did participate in many campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia. Its companies were the Fauquier Light Artillery, the Richmond Fayette Light Artillery, the Hampden Light Artillery, and Latham's-Blount's Battery. See history of each unit for details. The field officers were Majors Joseph G. Blount, James Dearing, John P.W. Read, and Robert M. Stribling.
    Associated units:
    Hampden Light Artillery:
    Hampden Light Artillery was organized at Richmond, Virginia, in May, 1861 , with men from Richmond. After serving in Jackson's Valley Campaign,it was assigned to R.S. Andrews', J.Dearing's, H.P. Jones', J.P.W. Read's (38th Battalion), and R.M. Stribling's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia. Participated in the defense of Petersburg,
    Ended the war at Appomattox. The battery was commanded by Captains William H. Caskie, Lawrence S. Marye, and John E. Sullivan.
    Latham's-Blount's Battery:
    Latham's-Blount's Battery completed its organization at Lynchburg, Virginia, in April, 1861. After taking an active part in the Battle of First Manassas, the unit was assigned to J. Dearing's, H.P. Jones', J.P.W. Read's (38th Battalion), and R.M. Stribling's Battalion of Artillery.
    It surrendered at Appomattox with only 3 men. Captains Joseph G. Blount, James Dearing, James W. Dickerson, and J.Grey Latham were in command.
    Fauquier Light Artillery:
    Fauquier Light Artillery was organized as infantry in June, 1861, and assigned to the 49th Regiment Virginia Infantry as Company G (1st). In September or October it transferred to the artillery. Attached to the Army of Northern Virginia the unit served in J. Dearing's, J.P.W. Read's (38th Battalion), and R.M. Stribling's Battalion of Artillery.
    Sustained 9 casualties at Kelly’s Ford, and surrendered with only 3 men. Its commanders were Captains William C. Marshall and Robert M. Stribling.
  • 38th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Pittsylvania Regiment) (Confederate)
    38th Infantry Regiment was organized in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, in June, 1861. Its members were recruited in Pittsylvania, Halifax, and Mechlenburg counties. It served under the command of Generals Early, Garland, Armistead, Barton, and Steuart.
    The unit surrendered 12 officers and 82 men. Its commanders were Colonels Joseph R. Cabell, Edward C. Edmonds, George K. Griggs, and Powhatan B. Whittle; Lieutenant Colonel George A. Martin; and Majors Isaac H. Carrington and Henderson L. Lee.
  • 39th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    39th Cavalry Battalion (also called Richardson's Battalion of Scouts, Guides, and Couriers) was organized with two companies, later increased to four.
    On April 9, 1865, it contained 1 officer and 80 men. Major John H. Richardson was in command.
  • C39th Regiment, Virginia Militia (Confederate)
    39th Infantry Regiment was organized during the summer of 1861 with eleven companies: eight infantry, two cavalry, and one artillery.
    Efforts failed to reorganize the regiment, and it disbanded on February 3, 1862. Its commanders were Colonel Charles Smith, Lieutenant Colonel Louis C.H. Finney, and Major N.R. Cary.

Units 40th through 43rd

  • 40th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Organized in July, 1863, with six companies. <br.During September 1863, it merged into the 42nd Battalion Virginia Cavalry. Lieutenant Colonel William T. Robins and Major John F. Wren were in command.
  • 40th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Completed its organization in May, 1861. Its members were recruited in Northumberland, Richmond, and Lancaster counties. After serving in the Aquia District, the unit was assigned to General Field's, Heth's, and H.H. Walker's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia.
    Many were captured at Sayler's Creek and only 7 men were included in the surrender on April 9, 1865. Field officers were Colonel John M. Brockenbrough; Lieutenant Colonels Fleet W. Cox, Arthur S. Cunningham, and Henry H. Walker; and Majors Edward T. Stakes and William T. Taliaferro.
  • 41st Regiment, Virginia Militia (Confederate)
    Completed its organization in July, 1861. Men of this unit were recruited in Petersburg and Sussex, Chesterfield, Norfolk, and Nansemond counties. After serving in the Department of Norfolk, it was assigned to General Mahone's and Weisiger's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 10 officers and 99 men. The field officers were Colonels John R. Chambliss, Jr. and William A. Parham, Lieutenant Colonels George Blow, Jr. and Joseph P. Minetree, and Majors William H. Etheredge and Francis W. Smith.
  • 42nd Battalion, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Organized in September 1863, by consolidating the 32nd and 40th Battalions Virginia Cavalry
    In June 1864 it merged into the 24th Regiment Virginia Cavalry.
    Lieutenant Colonel William T. Robins and Major John R. Robertson were in command.
  • 42nd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Organized at Staunton, Virginia, in July, 1861, recruited its members in Henry, Floyd, Bedford, Campbell, Roanoke, Patrick, and Franklin counties.
    Of the 265 engaged at Gettysburg, twenty-one percent were killed, wounded, or missing. Only 1 officer and 44 men surrendered. The field officers were Colonels Jesse S. Burks, Andrew J. Deyerle, John E. Penn, and R.W.Withers; Lieutenant Colonels Daniel A. Langhorne, William Martin, and Samuel H. Saunders; and Majors P.B. Adams, Henry Lane, and Jesse M. Richardson.
  • 43rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    Assembled during the summer of 1861 at Winchester, Virginia. However, no rolls or roster of the 43rd are known to exist. The unit failed to complete its organization. Colonel R.M. Conn was in command.

Units 44th through 47th

  • 44th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    44th Infantry Battalion [also called Petersburg City Battalion] was formed in November, 1863, at Petersburg, Virginia. It contained three companies and later expanded to five. The unit served in the Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia, then Company B was assigned as Provost Guard and Companies A,C, D, and F to General Archers' Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia.
    The unit contained 167 men in September, 1864, and surrendered with 6 officers and 52 men. Major Peter V. Batte was in command.
  • 44th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    44th Infantry Regiment was organized in June, 1861, with men from Richmond and Farmville, and Appomattox, Buckingham, Louisa, Goochland, Amelia, Fluvanna, and Hanover counties.
    At Gettysburg more than twenty percent were disabled. Only 1 officer and 12 men surrendered in April, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Norvell Cobb and William C. Scott; Lieutenant Colonels Thomas R. Buckner, James L. Hubard, A.C. Jones; and Major David W. Anderson.
  • 45th Battalion, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    45th Infantry Battalion was organized by detachments between April and December, 1863. Its six companies were composed of men from the 1st Regiment Cavalry Virginia State Line which had disbanded.
    It disbanded during April, 1865. Lieutenant Colonel Henry M. Beckley and Major Blake L. Woodson were in command.
  • 45th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    45th Infantry Regiment was formed in May, 1861, with men from Tazewell, Wythe, Grayson, Carroll, and Bland counties. It was assigned to Echols', G.C. Wharton's, and Forsberg's Brigade, and served in western Virginia.
    During April, 1865, disbanded. The field officers were Colonels William H. Browne, Henry Heth, and W.E. Peters; Lieutenant Colonels Benjamin F. Ficklin, Edwin H. Harman, and William H. Werth; and Majors A.M. David, William C. Sanders, and Gabriel C. Wharton.
  • 46th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    46th Cavalry Battalion was organized in February, 1864, with six companies. The unit served in W.L. Jackson's Brigade,
    In December it merged into the 26th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. Lieutenant Colonel Joseph K. Kesler and Major Henry D. Ruffner were in command.
  • 46th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    46th Infantry Regiment [also called 1st or 2nd Regiment, Wise Legion] was organized in August, 1861.
    Ended the war at Appomattox. And surrendered 15 officers and 116 men on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels J. Lucius Davis, Richard T.W. Duke, Randolph Harrison, and John H. Richardson; Lieutenant Colonel Peyton Wise; and Majors Hugh W. Fry, Jr. and James C. Hill.
  • 47th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    47th Cavalry Battalion was organized in April, 1864, with four companies. It was assigned to W.L. Jackson's Brigade. During December the unit merged into the 26th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. Major William N. Harman was in command.
  • 47th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    47th Infantry Regiment was formed in June, 1861, with men recruited in Caroline, Middlesex, Essex, and Stafford counties. The unit served under the command of Generals Pettigrew, Field, Heth, H.H. Walker, and Barton.
    During February, 1865, the 47th and 55th Regiments were consolidated, but only 2 sergeants of the 47th surrendered on April 9. The field officers were Colonels Robert M. Mayo and George W. Richardson; Lieutenant Colonels James D. Bruce, William J. Greene, and John W. Lyell; and Majors Charles J. Green and Edward P. Tayloe.

Units 48th through 53rd

  • 48th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    48th Infantry Regiment, organized at Big Spring, near Abingdon, Virginia, in September, 1861, contained men from Scott, Washington, Smyth, Lee, and Russell counties. Later was assigned to General J.R. Jones' and W. Terry's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia.
    Of the 265 engaged at Gettysburg more than twenty-five percent were disabled. Only 4 officers and 38 men surrendered. The field officers were Colonels John A. Campbell, Robert H. Dungan, and Thomas S. Garnett; Lieutenant Colonel Oscar White; and Majors James C. Campbell, Wilson Faris, and D. Boston Stewart.
  • 49th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    49th Infantry Regiment completed its organization in July, 1861. Its members were from the counties of Prince William, Warren, Fauquier, Rappahannock, Amherst, and Shenandoah. Three companies fought at First Manassas and these companies formed the nucleus of the regiment. It was assigned to General Featherston's, Early's, W.Smith's, Pegram's, and J.A. Walker's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 9 officers and 46 men. The field officers were Colonels John C. Gibson and William Smith, Lieutenant Colonels Charles B. Christian and Edward Murray, and Major Caleb Smith.
  • 50th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    50th Infantry Regiment was organized in July, 1861, with ten companies and three companies of cavalry temporarily attached. During September one of the cavalry companies was disabled and the other two transferred to the 8th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. The unit was reorganized in May, 1862, with nine companies.
    During April, 1865, it disbanded. The field officers were Colonels Thomas Poage, Alexander M. Reynolds, and A.S. Vandeventer; Lieutenant Colonels William W. Finney and Logan H. N. Salyer; and Majors Lynville J. Perkins and C.E. Thorburn.
  • 51st Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    51st Infantry Regiment was formed in August, 1861, with eleven companies. Company L was later assigned to the 23rd Battalion. Its members were recruited in the counties of Wythe, Nelson, Bland, Floyd, and Grayson. During the war it started in General Floyd's and G.C. Wharton's Brigade.
    Only a handful remained after the Battle of Waynesborough. The field officers were Colonels Augustus Forsberg and Gabriel C. Wharton; Lieutenant Colonels George A. Cunningham, James W. Massie, and John P. Wolfe; and Majors William T. Akers, Stephen M. Dickey, D.P. Graham, D.S. Hounshell, and William A. Yonce.
  • 52nd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    52nd Infantry Regiment was organized at Staunton, Virginia, in August, 1861. Many of its members were from Augusta County.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 7 officers and 53 men of which 14 were armed. The field officers were Colonels John B. Baldwin, John D. Lilley, John D.H. Ross, and Thomas H. Watkins.
  • 53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    53rd Infantry Regiment was organized in December, 1861, by consolidating Tomlin's and Montague's Battalions, and Waddill's Infantry Company. Many of the men were recruited in Halifax, New Kent, Charles City, and Pittsylvania counties. It was assigned to General Armistead's, Barton's, and Steuart's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia.
    Many were captured at Sayler's Creek, and 6 officers and 74 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels William R. Aylett, John Grammar, Jr., Carter L. Stevenson, and Harrison B. Tomlin; Lieutenant Colonels Rawley W. Martin, Edgar B. Montague, John C. Timberlake, and George M. Waddill; and Majors Henry Edmundson and William Leigh.

Units 54th through 58th

  • 54th Battalion, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    54th Infantry Battalion was organized on April 9, 1865, with nine companies. It was formed by consolidating detachments of the 54th and 63rd Regiments Virginia Infantry.
    The unit was attached to General Pettus' Brigade and surrendered with the Army of Tennessee on April 26. Lieutenant Colonel Connally H. Lynch was in command.
  • 54th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    54th Infantry Regiment was organized in October, 1861. It was soon ordered to Kentucky and took an active part in the engagement at Middle Creek. Later the unit was assigned to Trigg's, Reynolds', Brown's and Reynolds' Consolidated, and Palmer's Brigade, Army of Tennessee.
    On April 9, 1865, it merged into the 54th Battalion Virginia Infantry. The field officers were Colonel Robert C. Trigg; Lieutenant Colonels Henry A. Edmundson, William B. Shelor, and John J. Wade; and Majors John S. Deyerle, Austin Harman, and James C. Taylor.
  • 55th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    55th Infantry Regiment was organized in September, 1861, by the addition of four companies to W.N. Ward's "Essex and Middlesex" Battalion of Virginia Volunteers. It was assigned to General Field's, Heth's, H.H. Walker's, and Barton's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia.
    In February, 1865, the 47th and 55th Regiments were consolidated, but only 2 officers and 21 men of the 55th were present at the surrender. Its field officers were Colonels William S. Christian and Francis Mallory; Lieutenant Colonels Robert H. Archer and Evan Rice; and Majors Thomas M. Burke, Robert B. Fauntleroy, Charles N. Lawson, Andrew D. Saunders, and William N. Ward.
  • 56th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    56th Infantry Regiment completed its organization in September, 1861, with men from Louisa, Mecklenburg, Buckingham, Nelson, and Charlotte counties. It moved to Tennessee and attached to Floyd's Brigade was captured in the fight at Fort Donelson. After being exchanged, the unit returned to Virginia and was assigned to Pickett's, Garnett's, and Hunton's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia.
    Many were captured at Sayler's Creek, and only 3 officers and 26 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels William E. Green, Philip P. Slaughter, and William D. Stuart; Lieutenant Colonel Timoleon Smith; and Major John B. McPhail.
  • 57th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    57th Infantry Regiment was organized in September, 1861, by adding five independent companies to the five companies of E.F. Keen's Battalion. Some of the men were from Powhatan, Pittsylvania, and Botetourt counties. The unit was assigned to General Armistead's, Barton's, and Steuart's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia.
    Many were disabled at Sayler's Creek and on April 9, 1865, the unit surrendered 7 officers and 74 men. Its commanders were Colonels Lewis A. Armistead, George W. Carr, David Dyer, Clement R. Fontaine, Elisha F. Keen, and John B. Magruder; Lieutenant Colonels Waddy T. James, William H. Ramsey, and Benjamin H. Wade; and Majors Garland B. Hanes, David P. Heckman, and Andrew J. Smith.
  • 58th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    58th Infantry Regiment completed its organization in October, 1861. Most of its members were raised in Bedford, Franklin, and Amherst counties. After participating in Jackson's Valley Campaign the unit was assigned to Early's, W.Smith's, Pegram's, and J.A. Walker's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 2 officers and 63 men of which 22 were armed. The field officers were Colonels Francis H. Board, Edmund Goode, and Samuel H. Letcher; Lieutenant Colonels Stapleton Crutchfield and John G. Kasey; and Majors George E. Booker and Edward T. Walker.

Units 59th through 67th

  • 59th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)
    59th Infantry Regiment [also called 2nd Regiment, Wise Legion] was organized in August, 1861.
    Many were disabled at Sayler's Creek, and none of its members were present at the surrender. The field officers were Colonels Charles F. Henningsen and William B. Tabb, Lieutenant Colonels Frank P. Anderson and Joseph Jones, and Majors John Lawson and Robert G. Mosby.
  • 60th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (3rd Regiment, Wise Legion) (Confederate)
    60th Infantry Regiment [also called 3rd Regient, Wise Legion] was organized in August, 1861.
    During mid-April, 1865, it disbanded. The field officers were Colonels Beuhring H. Jones and William H. Starke; Lieutenant Colonels James L. Corley, William A. Gilliam, George W. Hammond, J.W. Spaulding, John C. Summers, and W.A. Swank; and Majors William S. Rowan, James W. Sweeney, and Jacob N. Taylor
  • 61st Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Wilson's)
    61st Infantry Regiment was organized at Petersburg, Virginia, in October, 1862, using the 7th Battalion Virginia Infantry as its nucleus. The men were from Portsmouth, and the counties of Norfolk, Isle of Wight, and Greensville. It was assigned to General Mahone's and Weisiger's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia.
    Lost about eight percent of the 356 at Gettysburg. The regiment surrendered 10 officers and 107 men. Its field officers were Colonels Virginius D. Groner and Samuel M. Wilson, Lieutenant Colonels William F. Niemeyer and William H. Stewart, and Major Charles R. McAlpine.
  • 62nd Regiment, Virginia Mounted Infantry (Confederate)
    62nd Regiment Mounted Infantry completed its organization in September, 1862. The unit was composed of infantry and cavalry until December when the cavalry companies united with other companies to form the 18th Regiment Virginia Partisan Rangers, and at times the 62nd Partisan Rangers, the 62nd Infantry, and Imboden's Partisan Rangers. The command was mounted during the latter part of 1863 and served in Imboden's Brigade.
    Disbanded in April, 1865. Its commanders were Colonels John D. Imboden and George H. Smith, Lieutenant Colonels Robert L. Doyle and David B. Lang, and Majors Houston Hall and George W. Imboden.
  • 63rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (McMahon's) (Confederate)
    63rd Infantry Regiment was organized in May, 1862. It served in Western Virginia, then joined the Army of Tennessee. The unit was assigned to Kelly's, Reynolds', Brown's, and Reynolds' Consolidated, and Palmer's Brigade. On April 9, 1865, merged into the 54th Battalion Virginia Infantry.
    Few surrendered on April 26. The field officers were Colonels James M. French and John J. McMahon, and Lieutenant Colonels David C. Dunn and Connally H. Lynch
  • 64th Regiment, Virginia Mounted Infantry (Confederate)
    64th Regiment Mounted Infantry was organized in December, 1862, by consolidating the 21st and 29th Battalions Virginia Infantry.
    April, 1865, less than 50 disbanded. The field officers were Colonels Auburn L. Pridemore and Campbell Slemp, Lieutenant Colonel James B. Richmond, and Major Harvey Gray.

Units 68th through 86th

Units 87th through 108th

Units 109th through 127th

Units 129th through 146th

Units 151st through 185th

Units 187th through 198th

A Units

  • A. Graham's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Rockbridge Artillery)(Confederate)
    Rockbridge Light Artillery No. 1 was organized by W.N. Pendleton, rector of Grace Church in Lexington, Virginia, in May, 1861. Its members were recruited in Rockbridge County.
    It lost twenty-five percent of the 85 engaged at Gettysburg. It surrendered with 3 officers and 21 men. Captains Archibald Graham, William McLaughlin, William N. Pendleton, and William T. Poague were in command.
  • Ancell's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Cocke's-Ancell's Battery [also called 2nd Fluvanna Artillery] was organized in August, 1861.
    During November, 1862, it merged with Holman's-Huckstep's Battery to form the Fluvanna Light Artillery. Captains John J. Ancell and Cary C. Cocke were in command.
  • Ashby's 7th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate)
    Organized during the late spring of 1861. In October authority was given to increase its size, and by the summer of 1862 the regiment contained twenty--nine companies. Field officers: Colonels Turner Ashby, Richard H. Dulany, William E. Jones, and A. W. McDonald; Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Marshall; and Majors 0. R. Funsten, Daniel C. Hatcher, and Samuel B. Myers.

B Units

  • Barr's Company, Virginia Light Artillery Levi's Battery (Confederate)
    [also called Louisiana Tigers] was organized in October, 1862, as part of Thomas' North Carolina Legion. It contained men from Louisiana, Tennessee, North Carolina, and the disbanded troops of the Virginian State Line.
    In March, 1865, it rejoined Thomas' Legion in the District of Western North Carolina and surrendered in May. Captains John W. Barr and John T. Levi

C Units

  • Carpenter's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Alleghany Rough Artillery) (Confederate) Alleghany Light Artillery was organized at Covington, Virginia, in April, 1861, with 83 officers and men. It was also called Alleghany Roughs, and later Carpenter's Battery. Joined the Army of Northern Virginia. Here it served in R.S. Andrews', J.W. Latimer's, and C.M. Braxton's Battalion of Artillery.
    Many were captured at Five Forks, and only 1 man surrendered on April 9, 1865. It was commanded by Captains John C. Carpenter, Joseph Carpenter, and Thompson McAllister.
  • Cayce's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Purcell Artillery) (Confederate)
    Purcell Light Artillery, completed its organization at Richmond, Virginia, in April, 1861. The unit was assigned to R.L. Walker's and W.J. Pegram's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    It was included in the surrender on April 9, 1865. Its captains were George M. Cayce, William J. Pegram, and R. Lindsay Walker.
  • C.F. Johnston's Company, Virginia Artillery (Albemarle Artillery) (Everett Artillery) (Confederate)
    Albemarle Light Artillery [also called Albemarle Everett Artillery] was organized during June, 1861, with men from Albemarle County. The unit was assigned to the 1st Regiment Virginia Artillery but served as an independent command. It was attached to L.M. Coleman's, R.S. Andrews', and W.T. Poague's Battalion of Artillery.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 3 officers and 45 men. Captains Charles F. Johnston, William H. Southall, and James W. Wyatt were in command.
  • Clutter's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Johnson's-Clutter's Battery [also called Jackson's Flying Artillery] was organized at Richmond, Virginia, during March, 1862, with men from Richmond.
    The battery had 96 men at Gettysburg and surrendered with 1 officer and 55 men. Its captains were Valentine J. Clutter and Marmaduke Johnson.
  • Cooper's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Stafford Light Artillery was organized in August, 1861, with men recruited in Stafford County.
    Lost many in the fight at Sayler's Creek, and surrendered with only 3 privates. Its commanders were Captains John R. Cocke, Raleigh L. Cooper, and Thomas B. French.
  • Courtney Artillery, Virginia (Henrico Artillery) (Confederate)
    Courtney Light Artillery, recruited in Henrico County, was organized during June, 1861. After participating in Jackson's Valley Campaign it was assigned to A.R. Courtney's, H.P. Jones', and W.E. Cutshaw's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    It disbanded early in 1865. Its captains were Alfred R. Courtney, Joseph W. Latimer, and William A. Tanner.

D Units

  • Dance's Company, Virginia Artillery (Powhatan Artillery) (Confederate)
    Powhatan Light Artillery was organized in July, 1861, with men raised in Powhatan County. The unit served in the Army of Northern Virginia assigned to J.T. Brown's and R.A. Hardaway's Battalion of Artillery.
    Many were captured at Sayler's Creek on April 6, 1865. Only 1 man surrendered with the army. Captain Willis J. Dance was in command.
  • Donald's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Rockbridge Light Artillery No. 2 was organized as infantry served in the 52nd Regiment. All the officers and men were raised in Rockbridge County. In September, 1861, the company transferred to the artillery.
    At Gettysburg, it surrendered 1 officer and 27 men. The captains were William K. Donald, John A.M. Lusk, and John Miller
  • Douthat's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Botetourt Artillery) (Confederate)
    Botetourt Light Artillery was organized with men from Botetourt County in May, 1861, as an infantry company. It was assigned to the 28th Regiment Virginia Infantry but in December transferred to the artillery.
    During April, 1865, the company disbanded. Its commanders were Captains Joseph W. Anderson, Henry C. Douthat, and John W. Johnson.
  • Drewry's Company, Virginia Artillery (Southside Artillery) (Confederate)
    Southside Light Artillery was organized in January, 1862, with men from Chesterfield County. It was assigned to the 2nd Regiment Virginia Artillery and when that unit disbanded, it became an independent command.
    Converted to infantry, the company ended the war at Appomattox where 1 officer and 67 men surrendered. Its commanders were Captains John W. Brewry and James B. Jones.

E Units

  • E.J. Anderson's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Thomas Light Artillery was organized in May, 1861, at Richmond, Virginia.
    The battery was active from the Seven Days' Battles to Sharpsburg, then in October disbanded. Its members were then transferred to the Hampden Light Artillery. Captain Edwin J. Anderson was in command.

F Units

  • Fleet's Company, Virginia Artillery (Middlesex Artillery) (Confederate)
    Middlesex Light Artillery was organized as an infantry company in May, 1861. It served as Company K (1st) in the 47th Regiment, then became Company B of the 55th Regiment. During February, 1862, it was transferred to the artillery.
    The unit served with the Army of Northern Virginia until after the Maryland Campaign, then in October disbanded. The men transferred to the Ashland Light Artillery and Jackson's Flying Artillery. It was commanded by Captain William C. Fleet.
  • Giles Light Artillery (Pearisburg Reserves) (Confederate)
    Giles Light Artillery (also called Pearisburg Reserves) was organized in June, 1861, with men raised in Giles County.
    The company took part in the Appomattox Campaign and surrendered with no officers and 66 men. It was under the command of Captains David A. French and William McComas.
  • Fry's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Orange Artillery) (Confederate)
    Orange Light Artillery was formed at Richmond, Virginia, in May, 1861. After serving in the Department of the Peninsula, it was assigned to H.P. Jones', T.H. Carter's, R.C.M. Page's , and W.E. Cutshaw's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    Ended the war at Appomattox and surrendered with 20 men. Its commanders were Captains Charles W. Fry and Thomas J. Peyton.

G Units

  • G.W. Brown's Company, Virginia Horse Artillery (Confederate)
    McGregor's Battery [also known as the Stuart Horse Artillery-2nd Artillery] was organized in August, 1862, by dividing Pelham's original company.
    Had 106 engaged at Gettysburg, and surrendered only 2 in April, 1865. Its commanders were Captains G. Wilmer Brown, M.W. Henry, and William M. McGregor.
  • Goochland Light Artillery, Virginia (Confederate)
    Goochland Light Artillery was organized in May, 1861, with men recruited in Goochland County.
    During March or April the unit was broken up. Captains John H. Guy and Jonathan Talley were in command.
  • Grandy's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Norfolk Light Artillery Blues) (Confederate)
    Norfolk Blues Light Artillery was formed in 1828 and placed on active duty in April, 1861, as Company H (1st), 16th Regiment Virginia Infantry. During March, 1862, it was transferred to the artillery. The unit was assigned to J.J. Garnett's and C. Richardson's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    This battery took 106 effectives into the fight at Gettysburg and surrendered on April 9, 1865, with 1 Warrant-Officer and 13 men. Captains Charles R. Grandy and Jacob Vickery were in command.
  • Griffin's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Salem Flying Artillery) (Confederate)
    Salem Flying Artillery was organized as an infantry company and served with the 9th Regiment. In May, 1862, it was transferred to the artillery. All of its members were recruited to Roanoke County. The unit was assigned to J.T. Brown's and R.A. Hardaway's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered 1 officer and 97 men. Captains Charles B. Griffin and Abraham Hupp were in command.

H Units

  • Hankins' Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Surry Light Artillery) (Confederate)
    Surry Light Artillery was organized as infantry and assigned to the 3rd Regiment Virginia Infantry. During April, 1862, it was transferred to the artillery. The unit was assigned to the Richmond defenses and later to C.E. Lightfoot's Battalion, Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia.
    It ended the war at Appomattox with 19 men. Its commanders were Captains James D. Hankins and Thomas W. Ruffin.

I and J Units

  • Jackson's Battalion, Light Artillery, Virginia State Line (Confederate)
    Jackson Light Artillery was organized at Winchester, Virginia, during March, 1862. It was active in Jackson's Valley Campaign, then served with the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days' Battles to Sharpsburg.
    In September the unit was mustered out of service and the men joined in the Alleghany Light Artillery. Its commander was Captain Wilford E. Cutshaw.
  • Jackson's Company, Virginia Horse Artillery (2nd Organization 1863-65) (Confederate)
    Jackson's Battery [also called Charlottesville Horse Battery] was organized in May, 1863, with men from John P. Hale's Battery which was broken up by its capture at Fort Donelson in February, 1862, and recruits and transfers principally from the 8th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. It was assigned to Jenkins' Cavalry Brigade, Lomax's Horse Artillery Battalion, and in 1865, M. Johnson's Battalion. This unit took 54 men to Gettysburg, then served in southwest Virginia and in Early's Shenandoah Valley operations. In March, 1865, it moved to North Carolina. Captain Thomas E. Jackson was in command.
  • J.R. Johnson's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Bowyer's-Johnson's Battery, recruited in Bedford County, was organized in May, 1861, as an infantry company. Assigned to the 28th Regiment, it was transferred to the artillery in August.
    On October 4, 1862, it disbanded and its 52 men were equally distributed to the Purcell and Fauquier Light Artillery Companies. The battery was commanded by Captains Thomas M. Bowyer and John R. Johnson.
  • Johnston's Battery, Virginia Artillery (Confederate)
    Johnston Heavy Artillery was organized in September, 1861, with men from Dinwiddie County. Reorganized in 1862 under the same captain.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with the Army of Northern Virginia. Captain Branch J. Epes was in

K and L Units

  • Kevill's Company, Virginia Artillery (United Artillery) (Confederate)
    United Light Artillery was organized as infantry and attached to the 41st Regiment. All of its members were recruited in Norfolk County. During April, 1862, it was transferred to the artillery and assigned to the 19th Battalion Virginia Artillery. In June it was detached and placed in the Richmond defenses.
    Ended the war at Appomattox with 1 officer and 29 men. Captain Thomas Kevill was in command.
  • L.F. Jones' Company, Virginia Artillery (2nd Company, Richmond Howitzers) (Confederate)
    Richmond Howitzers 2nd Company was organized in May, 1861, and for a time served in the 1st Regiment Virginia Artillery. After becoming an independent command, it was assigned to J.T. Brown's, R.A. Hardaway's, and W.E. Cutshaw's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    It took 64 effectives to Gettysburg and surrendered with 1 officer and 45 men. Its commanders were John T. Brown, Henry Hudnall, and David Watson.

M Units

  • McClanahan's Company, Virginia Horse Artillery (Confederate)
    McClanahan's Battery [also called Staunton Artillery] was organized in February, 1863, and for a time served with the 62nd Regiment Mounted Rifles.
    Disbanded during the spring of 1865. Its captains were George W. Imboden and John H. McClanahan.
  • Montgomery's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Morris Light Artillery [also called Louisa Battery] was organized during August, 1861. The unit was assigned to W. Nelson's, H.P. Jones', T.H. Carter's, R.C.M. Page's, and W.E. Cutshaw's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    It surrendered 31 men on April 9, 1865. Captains Lewis M. Coleman, Charles R. Montgomery, and R.C.M. Page were in command.
  • Moore's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Huger's-Moore's Battery was organized in June, 1861, with men from Norfolk, Virginia. After serving in the Department of Norfolk, the unit was assigned to J.J. Garnett's and C. Richardson's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    This battery took 77 men to Gettysburg but surrendered only 3. Captains Frank Huger and Joseph D. Moore were in command.
  • Mosby's Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Partisan Rangers) (Confederate)
    Mosby's Cavalry Regiment, formerly the 43rd Battalion, was organized in December, 1864. The battalion was formed in June, 1863, with five companies, later increased to eight.
    Mosby assembled his men at Salem on April 21, and the command disbanded. The field officers were Colonel John S. Mosby, Lieutenant Colonel William H. Chapman, and Major A.E. Richards.

N and O Units

  • Otey's Company, Virginia Light Artillery, Local Defense (Confederate)
    Otey Light Artillery was organized at Richmond, Virginia, in March, 1862. It became part of the 13th Battalion Virginia Artillery but for some time operated as an independent command. Was ordered to join the Army of Northern Virginia.
    Ended the war at Appomattox as infantry. The company was commanded by Captains G. Gaston Otey and David N. Walker.

P Units

  • Parker's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Parker's Battery completed its organization at Richmond, Virginia, in March, 1862. It served in S.D. Lee's, E.P. Alexander's, and J.C. Huger's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    The company was included in the surrender on April 9, 1865, but only 3 members were present. Captains J.T. Brown, Jr. and William W. Parker were its commanders.
  • Pegram's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Branch Field Artillery)Branch's (Confederate)
    Pegram's Battery was organized in May, 1861, with men from Petersburg, Virginia. It first served as infantry with the 16th Regiment, then was transferred to the artillery in March, 1862. The company was assigned to J.R. Branch's and J.C. Coit's Battalion of Artillery.
    Almost every member was captured in the battle of Sayler's Creek. Captains James R. Branch and Richard G. Pegram were in command
  • Penick's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Lewis' Battery [also called Pittsylvania Artillery] was organized during April, 1862. For a time, part of this company served with the 59th Virginia Regiment. It was assigned to J.J. Garnett's, C.Richardson's, and W.T. Poague's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    In April, 1865, it surrendered 2 officers and 68 men. The battery was commanded by Captains John W. Lewis and Nathan Penick.
  • Price's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Danville Artillery) (Confederate)
    Danville Light Artillery was organized at Danville, Virginia, during April, 1861, with men from Pittsylvania County. It participated in Lee's Cheat Mountain Campaign and Jackson's Valley operations, then served in L.M. Shumaker's and D.G. McIntosh's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered 4 officers and 79 men. Captains Berryman Z. Price, R. Sidney Rice, Lindsay M. Shumaker, and George W. Wooding were its commanders.

R Units

  • Richardson's Company, Virginia Artillery (James City Artillery) (Confederate)
    James City Light Artillery was organized as infantry during the summer of 1861 and became Company H of the 32nd Virginia Infantry. Later it was transferred to the 1st Regiment Virginia Artillery as Company B.
    Early in 1865 the battery ceased to exist, but 2 of its members surrendered at Appomattox. Captains Alex Hankins and Lucien W. Richardson were in command.
  • Rives' Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Nelson Light Artillery)(Confederate)
    Nelson Light Artillery No. 2 was organized during August, 1861, with men from Nelson County. This battery was assigned to A.W. Stark's, J.M. Maury's, and C.E. Lightfoot's Battalion, Department of Richmond.
    In July, 1862, it contained 2 officers and 69 men, but only 2 were present at the surrender. Captain J. Henry Rives was in command.
  • Rogers' Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Loudoun Artillery) (Confederate)
    Loudon Light Artillery was organized in 1859 as part of the Virginia militia and entered Confederate service in July, 1861.
    In October the company was ordered to disband, and 61 men were transferred to the Morris Light Artillery and 28 to the Orange Battery. Captains Patrick H. Clark and Abram Wimbish were in command.

S Units

  • Shoemaker's Company, Virginia Horse Artillery (Beauregard Rifles) (Confederate)
    (Lynchburg Beauregards)Moorman's-Shoemaker's Battery [also called Lynchburg Horse Artillery or Bearegard's Rifles] was organized at Lynchburg, Virginia, in April, 1861. The unit was assigne to J.S. Saunder's, J. Pelham's, R.F. Beckham's, and J. Breathed's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia.
    Disbanded at Lynchburg on April 9, 1865. Its commanders were Captains Macellus N. Moorman and John J. Shoemaker.
  • Sturdivant's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Sturdivant's Battery [also called Albemarle Artillery] was organized in March, 1862. This unit served as an independent command, but for a time in 1864 was part of the 12th Battalion Virginia Artillery.
    Surrendered 3 officers and 45 men at Appomattox. Captain Nathaniel A. Sturdivant was in command.

T Units

  • Taylor's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Eubank's-Taylor's Battery [also called Bath Artillery] was organized in March, 1862. It was assigned to the 12th Battalion Virginia Artillery, but became an independent company in August, 1862.
    On April 9, 1865, it was included in the surrender. Captains John L. Eubank and Osmond B. Taylor were in command.
  • Turner's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Turner Light Artillery was organized in August, 1861, with men from Goochland County.
    During October it was ordered to disband. Its 48 men were transferred to the King William Light Artillery. Captain Walter D. Leake was its commander.

U and V Units

  • Utterback's Company, Virginia Light ArtilleryBrook’s Battery (Confederate)
    [also called Warrenton Light Artillery] was organized in April, 1862. The company was assigned to the 12th Battalion Virginia Artillery, then in August became an independent command.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 3 officers and 37 men. Captains James V. Brooke and Addison W. Utterback were in command.

W and Y Units

  • W.P. Carter's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    King William Light Artillery was formed in the spring of 1861 with men raised in King William County. The battery served in T.H. Carter's, R.C.M. Page's, and W.E. Cutshaw's Battalion of Artillery.
    It surrendered with 1 officer and 22 men. Captains Thomas H. Carter and William P. Carter were its commanders.
  • Wimbish's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Long Island Light Artillery) (Confederate)
    Long Island Light Artillery, recruited in Campbell County, was organized in March, 1862. It was attached to H.P. Jones' Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia,
    In October the company was ordered to disband, and 61 men were transferred to the Morris Light Artillery and 28 to the Orange Battery. Captains Patrick H. Clark and Abram Wimbish were in command.
  • Young's Company, Virginia Artillery (Halifax Light Artillery) (Confederate)
    Young's Battery [also called Halifax Artillery] was formed during the early spring of 1861 with men from Halifax County. It served as infantry with the 14th Regiment until May, 1862, when it transferred to the 1st Battalion, then the 1st Regiment Virginia Artillery.
    Surrendered on April 9, 1865, attached to J.G. Blount's Battalion. Captain Edward R. Young was in command.

References

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