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Native Americans, or American Indians in Canada are generally referred to as Aboriginal peoples, which include the First Nations, Inuit, and Métis (mixed blood).

Provinces and Territories

For additional information about the First Nations in each of the Provinces and Territories, see the links below:

Calendar

  • 1850 First of a series of treaties between Indians and the Crown.
  • 1860 The Crown Lands Department took over responsibility for Indian Affairs from the Imperial Government.
  • 1867 Indian Affairs became the responsibility of the Secretary of State
  • 1873 Indian Affairs became a branch of the Department of the Interior
  • 1876 The Indian Act was passed. Provided the foundation for the administration of Indian affairs in Canada. Parliament had authority with respect to Indians and their lands.
  • 1880 A separate Department of Indian Affairs was established
  • 1936 Indian Affairs became a branch of the Department of Mines
  • 1939 The Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the tern "Indians", as used in the British North America Act, included Inuit inhabitants of Quebec. (A later ruling extended the BNA Act provision for Indians to all Inuit throughout Canada)
  • 1950 The Department of Citizenship and Immigration assumed responsibility for Indian Affairs.
  • 1951 The Indian Act was revised.
  • 1966 Indian Affairs was incorporated into a new Department Indian Affairs and Northern Development.
  • 1969 The government's "white paper" aroused controversy and was rejected by the Indian people. The government subsequently agreed that provisions of the Indian Act would not be amended without consulting the Indian people.
  • 1975 The government announced its intent to redefine its relationship with the country's 280,000 (at the time) status Indians to maintain their identity within Canadian society and to safeguard their unique constitutional rights. [1]

Records

Land Records

A Lands and Membership Branch of the Indian Affairs department identifies, protects and records the interest in the lands to which Indian people are entitled. Its responsibility lies fundamentally in the administration of 6.4 million acres of Indian lands divided into 2,233 reserves, set apart for 575 bands and the administration of the status rights of Indian people.[2]


Research Tools

Resources that may be helpful in the search for your Canadian Indian ancestry include:

Treaty

  • 1796 May 31, at New York with the Seven Nations of Canada

Reference

  1. The Canadian Indian by Public Communications and parliamentary Relations, Indian and Eskimo Affairs Program, Department of Indian and Northern Affairs, Ottawa. Government of Canada, 1981 ISSN 0228 3808
  2. The Canadian Indian by Public Communications and parliamentary Relations, Indian and Eskimo Affairs Program, Department of Indian and Northern Affairs, Ottawa. Government of Canada, 1981 ISSN 0228 3808

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  • This page was last modified on 11 September 2014, at 12:41.
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