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Here is a list of pre-1855 Glasgow area Free Presbyterian Churches with their histories and information about records.

Contents

Anderston Free Church

History—
The minister and congregation of Anderston church “came out” in 1843. The building they left stood vacant until 1849 when it was burned to ashes. The congregation worshipped for a time in Catherine Street Hall then in the Relief Church by courtesy of Dr. Struthers. A church was built of brick and opened in February 1844. A stone building was erected in 1849. The movement of population led, in 1876, to the removal of the church to a new site on University Avenue. From 1851 a mission was conducted in Anderston district.
Membership: 1848,700, 1900, 889.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—                            Years                FHL Film Number
Session Minutes                    1834–1862        1485261 items 2–4
Deacons Court Minutes          1844–1856         1485261 items 2–4


Bridgeton Free Church

History—
Alexander Wilson, minister of Bridgeton “Chapel of Ease” and the majority of the congregation “came out” in 1843. They were deprived of the church in February 1849. The new church was opened in December of that year. The school was erected in 1874 and transferred to the School Board of Clasgow in 1874.
Membership: 1848, 508; 1900, 308.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—                      Years                FHL Film Number
Session Minutes             1837–1867         1485042 items 3–5
Baptismal Register          1888–1932         1485042 items 3–5


Camlachie Free Church, later Whitevale

History—
The church of Camlachie was vacant at the Disruption but the congregation “came out”. They continued to worship in the church, where they were joined for a time by the Free Church people from Shelleston, until deprived of it in 1849. Then they met in Camlachie schoolroom while their own church in the Gallowgate was being built. It was opened in 1850. A house at Whitevale was gifted by Mr. John Brown for a manse. In 1880 church hall and vestry were added. In 1890 the old manse was sold and the proceeds applied towards purchase of a new manse in Broompark Terrace. The church was several times renovated and improved. Active mission work has always been carried on. This was known as Camlachie Free Church till about 1879 when the name was changed to Whitevale.
Membership: 1848, 250; 1900, 500.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—                    Years            FHL Film Number
Deacons Court Minutes  1844–1856     1485042 item 2


Kingston Free Church

Martyrs Free Church

History—
The minister and congregation of Martyrs parish “came out” in 1843. They were deprived of the church in 1849. During the six years 1843–1849 they paid a rent per annum to the Church Building Society for use of the church. Ejected on a week’s notice they worshiped with Free St. Andrew’s until 1850 when their new church was opened. A gallery was added in 1879 and halls etc. were erected in 1899.
Membership: 1848, 118; 1900, 571.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
Minutes 1843–1855
Note: Available at the Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, record CH3/968.


Renfield Free Church

History—
This was formerly the East Campbell Street Old Light congregation. A church was built in 1823 at the northwest corner of Renfield and Gordon Streets. They joined the Church of Scotland in 1839, taking their property with them. The minister and congregation adhered to the Free Church in 1843, again carrying their property with them. The church site was sold in 1853. A new church was erected and opened in 1858 at the corner of Bath and Elmbank Streets.
Membership: 1748, 713; 1900, 506.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.
Records—
Various Minutes 1839–1923
Communion Rolls 1848–1852
Note: Available at the Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, record CH3/1166.


Rose Street Free Church

Reference Title Date Access status
CH3/1271 Glasgow, Rose Street Free Church 1875-1891 Not Held
CH3/1271/1 Minutes 1875-1891

CH3/1271 and CH3/1271/1 See National Archives of Scotland


St. Enoch’s Free Church

History—
Dr. James Henderson, minister of St. Enoch’s and many of his people “came out” in 1843. They built a church forthwith on Waterloo Street. The church on Dumbarton Road, at Overnewton was erected in 1873. For some time it was known as the Melville Church.
Membership: 1848, 385; 1900, 750.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—                                  Years             FHL Film Number
Baptisms,                                   1844–1911      0889486 item 7
Communion Roll,                         1843–1934      1886221 item 2 in vault
Sunday School Society Minutes   1846–1861
Note: Available at the Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, record CH3/525.


St. John’s Free Church

History—
Dr. Thomas Brown, minister of St. John’s parish, and many of his people “came out” in 1843. Their new church was opened in June 1845. The church hall was built in 1874. This congregation also had to contend with losses caused by migration of members to the suburbs.
Membership: 1848, 800; 1900, 516.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914.Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
Minutes 1852–1923
Deacons Court Minutes 1852–1923
Note: Available at the Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, record CH3/1162.


St. Mark’s Free Church

History—
St. Mark’s, a Church Extension charge, was vacant at the Disruption. The congregation united with that of Brownfield church, the minister of which remained in the establishment. The united congregation worshiped in St. Mark’s Church as a congregation of the Free Church until 1848 when they were deprived of the building. In 1843 the new church in Anderston was erected.
Membership: 1848, 731; 1900, 548.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
Minutes 1846–1915
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/660.


St. Matthew’s Free Church

History—
In September 1843 those who adhered to the Free Church in St. Matthew’s parish were formed into a congregation. Their first church, afterwards known as West Church, was built in 1844. In 1850 a new church was erected on Bath Street. Cranstonhill and Queens Cross congregations both arose from missions conducted by St. Matthew’s. In 1886 mission premises erected in Doncaster Street became the centre of their mission work at Springbank.
Membership: 1848, 750; 1900, 1128.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
Minutes 1844–1953
Formula Book 1843–1948
Accounts 1852–1953
Communion Roll 1844–1910
Note: Available at the Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, record CH3/971.


St. Paul’s Free Church

History—
The minister of St. Paul’s Church, and most of his congregation “came out” in 1843. Anticipating the Disruption, certain leading members of St. Paul’s formed the Free Presbyterian Church Association which secured a site and arranged for the building of the new church at the corner of Frederick Street and Cathedral Street. In 1891 St. Andre’s congregation united with that of St. Paul’s retaining the name of the latter for the united congregation. See St. Andrews and worshiping in St. Paul’s Church.
Membership: 1848, 530; 1900, 800.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
Various Minutes 1843–1937
Treasurers Accounts 1843–1865
Note: Available at the Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, record CH3/1140.


St. Peter’s Free Church

History—
The minister of St. Peter’s along with his congregation adhered to the Free Church at the Disruption. The church belonged to the Church Building Society. They continued to worship in it paying a rent per annum until 1847. They then worshiped in winter in the City Hall and in summer in Albion Chapel until their new church was opened in 1850.
Membership: 1848, 965; 1900, 576.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
Deacons Court Minutes 1844–1855
Note: Available at the Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, record CH3/1266.


St. Stephen’s Free Church

History—
Dr. King, the minister of this Extension Charge, and his congregation adhered to the Free Church in 1843. They continued to worship in their church until deprived of it in 1848. The church on New City Road was opened in 1850 and halls were built in 1872. At first this was a West End congregation but the growth of the city made it a central charge.
Membership: 1848, 500; 1900, 719.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records Years FHL Film Number
Baptismal register 1850-1883 0889474 item 8
Communion roll 1838-1875 (w/gaps) ditto
Marriages 1850-1852 ditto
Session minutes 1837-1871 1562981 items 7–10 in vault
Deacons' court minutes 1843-1851 ditto
Treasurer's cash book 1849-1921 ditto
Fund accounts 1843-1934 ditto

Note: All of the above are available at the Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, record CH3/162.


Stockwell Free Church

History—
A portion of East Campbell Street Old Light congregation joined the Church of Scotland in 1839 and formed Stockwell Church. They “came out” in 1843 and formed Stockwell Free Church carrying their buildings with them. Owing to changes of population the church was sold in 1886 and the congregation moved to a new church on Albert Road, Polloksheilds.
Membership: 1848, 680; 1870, 810.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in source including a list of ministers.

Records—
Various Minutes 1842–1964
Note: Available at the Glasgow City Archives, Glasgow, record CH3/954.


Tron Free Church

History—
The congregation of the Tron Church “came out” at the Disruption. They worshiped in the City Hall until their church was opened in 1844. In 1857 the minister and part of the congregation were transferred to form the College Church.
Membership: 1848, 700; 1900, 611.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in source including a list of ministers.

Records—                             Years               FHL Film Number
Scroll Minutes                        1843–1847        1485042 items 6–8
Deacons’ Court Minutes          1844–1852        1485042 items 6–8


Kingston Free Church

History—
The minister and congregation of Kingston Church Extension charge “came out” at the Disruption in 1843. The congregation ceased in 1884 and the members dispersed.
Membership: 1848, 110; 1884, 164.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Family History Library Film #918572. More details may be given in source including a list of ministers.

Records—
Births 1848–1861 - Included in the Glasgow OPRs


Free Presbyterian Churches with no known pre–1855 records:

Duke Street, Gaelic Street, East Campbell Street, Hope Street, Hutchesontown, John Knox, Kingston, Lyon Street, Maryhill, Millerston, Milton, St. Andrew’s, St. David’s, St. George’s, St. Jame’s, St. Luke’s, Shettleston, Tollcross, Tradeston, Union (Laurieston), Victoria (formerly East Gorbals), Wellpark, West, Wynd, Young Street


 

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  • This page was last modified on 7 October 2011, at 18:41.
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