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Wikipedia


Goshen Valley was discovered in 1858 when some men were rounding up stray cattle. The men were impressed by its large meadow and accompanying creek. One of the men, Phineas Cook, led an evaluation of the meadow's potential for settlement. Soon after, Cook sought permission from Brigham Young to start settling the valley. By the next spring, in 1857, the first ten families came to Goshen; by the end of the summer, there were twenty-five families. These early settlers lived in shelters inside of a fort to protect themselves. Today, Goshen has remained a smaller town with under one thousand residents.

See Goshen Valley History by Raymond Duane Steele for more details.

Resources

Cemeteries


DUP members join in celebration-Marker Unveiled A new DUP marker was unveiled. The Old Pioneer Cemetery in Goshen Utah now has a marker to help remember those almost forgotten pioneers who graves were plowed over. We will now be able to have a place to hold them in loving remembrance. We rejoice with our ancestors that this great event has come to pass.

A program to commemorate the dedication of this new marker was held on August 22, 2009 at 10:30 am in Goshen at the cemetery sight. International DUP members Katherine Brimhall, marker chairman and Betty Barton, International DUP president were in attendance. The unveiling of this new marker for the valiant lives of those local pioneers was a powerful and spiritual experience for all those in attendance. The Chief Peteetneet Company are sponsoring this new marker. Local Marker chairman is Lanay Brinkerhoff who conducted and introduced the program.

The program began with a beautiful original song written and performed by a Sorensen descendent, Kay Sorenson, the Great Celebration. At which time 2 very large flocks of over 120 pelicans flew directly over the sight, in 2 large V formations, crossing paths directly over the marker, for an awesome beginning. One guest, Carol Downey, of Payson, Finch descendent commented “That was so powerful and what a spirit that brought”. Another guest Kathy Taylor , Finch descendent, of Fountain Green, said “ the entire feel of the dedication was one that you wanted to take with you and keep forever in your heart.”

The invocation was offered by President Brent R. Laker, of the Goshen Utah Stake. The presentation of the colors and Pledge of Allegiance was by troup 898 boy scouts, of Santaquin 5th ward. The Daughters of the Utah Pioneers song was sung with chorister Marlene Montague leading. Joyce K. Tate, descendant of Soren Christensen Sorensen shared some beautiful words and told of how this marker came to be and all those who worked so hard to make it happen. Many of the family members were present because they had a family reunion in Goshen this same day. Come Come Ye Saints was sung accompanied by Claudia Peterson on the Violin.

DUP member Rose Mary Nyman portrayed her forth great grandmother Mary Ann Garbett Finch as she told about her life and the death of 5 day old Mary Ellen Finch who died after her mother taking a tragic fall chasing a neighbor’s cow out of her garden, which resulted in a pre mature birth. And six week old baby Hyrum Finch who died along with 3 of the Sorensen children in 1879-80 of diphtheria.

Remarks from International Marker chairman Katherine Brimhall were then heard after which the unveiling of the marker by Lanay Brinkerhoff and Lucille Argyle , a Sorensen descendant. Dedication of the marker was done by Jerry Kirk, another Sorensen descendant. Taps was then played by Marlene Montague, of the marker committee. Refreshments were served by the local DUP and many historical photos were taken.

A special guest Leonard Kirk was present. He is a Sorensen descendant and is 100 years old. He went with Joyce Tate to get the rock for the marker and when he got home he said ”That rock isn’t big enough.” Thanks to him another rock was obtained and it is definitely big enough. You should drive out to Goshen and see this beautiful marker and become a part of history with the rest of us. We are truly “daughters of those grand old pioneers, and we prize their lives of service more that gold.”

Engraved on the new marker is as follows: Original Goshen Pioneer Cemetery “As early Latter-day Saint pioneers came to the Goshen Valley, they settled in area then known as Sandtown, The Bend, and the Fort. Latter President Brigham Young urged the settlers to form the township of Goshen and predicted that a new highway would be built near the existing cemetery. He instructed the pioneers to relocate their farms, homes and their cemetery to higher solid ground believed to be more fertile. Many moved their cabins and several of those buried in the original cemetery were interred in the New Goshen Cemetery located south of the newly established town. No record exists of those whose remains were moved. After 1880 no new burials were made in this cemetery.

The original Goshen Pioneer Cemetery is located 300 yards north of this monument in ground made sacred by the sacrifice of original and native pioneers who gave their all for their faith. The following Men women and infants are buried herein: Louisa Jane Bigelow 1858; Diana Dall 1859; John Shields Gardner 1862; William Edward Martin 1865; Julie Ann Gardner, 1865; Riley Stewart, 1866; Gertrude Sorensen, 1868; Henry Lyman Cook, 1869; Hyrum Cook, 1869; Mary Ann Weech, 1873; Mary Ellen Finch, 1876; Soren Christensen Sorensen, 18776; Henry David Dall, 1876; Samuel Weech, 1877; Hyrum Finch, 1879;Annie Marie Sorensen, 1880; Nelcie Sorensen, 1880; Soren Sorensen Jr., 1880;

We have not forgotten their lives and determined spirits; they play an important part of a vibrant heritage.” Information of the families of these grand old pioneers, Photos, and transcripts of these proceedings will be available at the DUP museum in the Payson city center. Stop by and pay us a visit. You’ll be glad you did. Pictured the Marker committee Marilyn Bowers, Wrenna Smith, Claudette Wood, Cynthia Peacock-Company President, Dawn Warenski, Katherine Brimhall-International Marker Chairman, Lanay Brinkerhoff-Company Marker Chairman, Betty Barton-International DUP President, Lazon Jarvis and Rose Nyman.

Church History and Records

  • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
  1. Goshen

When a smaller settlement called Mona settled roughly 12 miles north of Goshen, the people of Mona started using Goshen's main supply of water. Already having trouble with the allotted amounts of water given to them, the people of Goshen did not react well to their water supply being reduced even further. Disputes over water arose between the two settlements, and the dispute was taken to the church court to resolve the problem. When the people of Goshen refused to share their water with Mona, the dispute was taken to the civil courts of Utah, and Goshen won. However, this move was not sanctioned by church officials, and the entire Goshen ward, including the bishop, was suspended from the church for insubordination. In 1881, once the misunderstanding had been cleared up, the ward was reinstated after being re-baptized and re-confirmed. The disciplinary action for this ward is demonstrated in the FHL film no. 25982, a record of the early Goshen ward. There are columns that specifically record who was re-baptized when and by whom.

More details can be found in Raymond Duane Steele's Goshen Valley History.

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  • This page was last modified on 26 November 2013, at 01:31.
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