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Kalmar War (1611-1613)
  • A war in which Denmark and Norway fought together against Sweden.
Kansas-Nebraska Act
  • A federal law that established the Kansas and Nebraska Territories in 1854 and opened these territories to white settlers. This act ended the controversy between the Southern states, who wanted new territories to be open to slavery, and the Northern states, who wanted to prohibit slavery in new territories. The Kansas-Nebraska Act allowed settlers to choose whether or not to accept slavery.
Kaskaskia, city
  • The capital of the Illinois Territory, located in what is now southern Illinois. Originally founded by Jesuit priests, Kaskaskia became one of the centers of French life in the area.
Kaskaskia, Native Americans
  • A tribe of Native Americans who were part of the Illinois confederacy.
Kentucky governor land warrants
  • A collection of warrants for land east of the Tennessee River.
Kill van Kull Patent
  • A land grant given to a group of English Puritans in 1664. They in turn sold the southern part of the land to other New Englanders in 1666. The land is located between the Raritan and Passaic rivers.
Kirchenbuchduplikate, Germany
  • A transcript or copy of a church register. Church authorities required local priests to make these copies out of concern that the records might be destroyed in wars or fires.
Kirchenbücher, Germany
  • The German word for church records.
Kirk session, Scotland
  • A parish court in the Presbyterian Church. In Scotland the kirk session handled church discipline and and minor criminal cases. The kirk session, along with the heritors (landowners in the parish) also handled matters concerning the poor and education. Some of the records also mention christenings, marriages, and deaths.
Kirkebøger, Denmark
  • Danish church records. Almost everyone who lived in Denmark was listed in a church record. The Evangelical Lutheran Church (Danske Folkekirke) became the state church in 1536. As such, it is an arm of the national government. The church keeps the government's vital records.
Kirkebøker, Norway
  • Norwegian church records. Almost everyone who lived in Norway was recorded in a church record. The Evangelical Lutheran Church (Norske Kirke) became the state church in 1536. As such, it is an arm of the national government. The church keeps the government's vital records.
Klondike gold strike
  • A gold discovery found by George W. Carmack and some Native Americans in August 1896. They found the gold in Rabbit Creek, which Carmack renamed Bonanza Creek. The creek is near the town of Dawson in Canada's Yukon Territory and near the Alaskan border. Word of the discovery reached the outside world the next year, and the ensuing gold rush brought thousands of people to the Yukon Territory and Alaska in 1897 and 1898. However, most of the good claims were staked before outside prospectors arrived. Gold had been discovered previously in Alaska in 1880, which had led to the founding of Juneau. Additional strikes were discovered in 1898 in what would become Nome and in 1902 in Fairbanks.
Knight:
  • he second highest title in the British gentry, ranking directly below a baronet. In German nobility, a knight (Ritter) is the lowest rank. Knight (chevalier) is the highest rank in the French gentry (petite noblesse). A person who has the rank of knight is addressed as Sir, and his wife is called Lady. A knight was originally a man to whom the king granted land in exchange for military service.
Konfirmasjon, Norway
  • A Norwegian word for confirmation. In Norway confirmation consisted of passing a test about the catechism and taking the first communion. Confirmation took place when a person was 14 to 20 years old.
Konfirmationen
  • The German word for confirmations.
Konfirmationslängder, Sweden
  • Swedish confirmation records. In Sweden a person's confirmation consisted of passing a test about the catechism and taking the first communion. Confirmation took place between when a person was 14 to 16 years old and was an important event in the person's life.
Konfirmerede, Denmark
  • A Danish word for confirmation. In Denmark a person's confirmation consisted of passing a test about the catechism and taking the first communion. Confirmation took place when a person was 14 to 20 years old.
Korean War (1950-1953)
  • A war that occurred when Communist North Korea invaded non-Communist South Korea. The United Nations proclaimed that the invasion was a violation of international peace and demanded that the North withdraw. When the North refused, the United Nations requested troops to support the South Koreans. Sixteen countries sent troops, with the United States providing about 90 percent of them. Forty-one additional countries provided supplies. The war ended with an armistice agreement but without a permanent peace treaty.
Krabbe War (1657-1658)
  • A war in which Norway lost Trondheim and Romsdal to Sweden but regained Jämtland and Härjedalen, which Norway had lost in the Hannibal Feud.
Krigsarkivet, Sweden
  • The war archive in Stockholm, Sweden. It houses records having to do with the Swedish military.
Kyrkoböcker, Sweden
  • Swedish church records. Almost everyone who lived in Sweden was recorded in a church record. The Evangelical Lutheran Church (Svenska Kyrkan) became the state church in 1527. As such, it is an arm of the national government. The church keeps the government's vital records.

 

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  • This page was last modified on 3 April 2009, at 22:48.
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