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Keith, Banff, Scotland (#159)

Contents

History

Established Church—Old Parochial Registers

Years Covered FHL Film Numbers
Births: 1686-1740, 1746-1772

Years Covered FHL Film Numbers
Births: 1686–1740, 1746–1772 0990999
1772–1819 0991000
1820–1854 0991063
Marriages: 1705–1819 0991000
1820–1854 0991063
Deaths: 1748–1819 0991000
1820–1854 0991063

Condition of Original Registers—


Index: For an index to these records, see the Scottish Church Records Index on computer at the Family History Library under “Databases on the Network.”
Births: These were kept regularly. There is a duplicate of December 1696–June 1709. Prior to 1709, mothers’ names were not recorded.
Marriages: The greater portion of the page containing entries December 1764–March 1765 is destroyed. There are no entries July 1772–August 1779.
Deaths: These are transcribed entries of Mortcloth Dues, etc., until 1828. Interments are listed 1828–1854.
Source: Key to the Parochial Registers of Scotland, by V. Ben Bloxham, pub. 1970. British Book 941 K23b.


Established Church—Kirk Session Records

Minutes - discipline 1709–1746, 1748–1769, 1772–1908
Poors’ Funds 1700–1707
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, records CH2/570.



Nonconformist Church Records


Keith First Secession Church

History—
This group originated about 1765 and became part of the united congregations of Cabrach and Huntly, both in Aberdeenshire, Keith and Grange. The first minister served all four areas until 1775 when he confined himself to Huntly and left the rest to find other ministers. Keith and Grange were then united until 1785. The congregation built a church in 1780. This congregation still existed in 1873.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details are given in the source.

Records—
Extent of records is unknown.


Keith Second Secession Church, extinct

History—
About 1800, a group withdrew from the First Secession Church and allied with “The Tabernacle Men” (the Haldane brothers who held independent beliefs), see Huntly congregation in Aberdeenshire, to form a new church. They applied to the Associate Burgher Presbytery of Perth for supply of sermon, which was granted. They built a church in 1801 but the congregation disbanded when the minister resigned in 1841 and the building was sold to the Free Church.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details are given in the source.

Records—
Extent of records is unknown.


Keith Free Church

History—
The Free Church congregation began in 1839 when the Evangelicals left the Established Church. For a time they worshiped in one of the Secession Churches in Keith. When the Second Secession church building became available, they bought that building. In 1846, they built a new church and provided a school.
Membership: 1848, 450; 1900, 487.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details are given in the source.
Records—
Extent of records is unknown.


Keith Congregational Church

History—
A church in Keith began in 1801 but existed only briefly. In 1841 another church was formed and used the chapel built in 1801, but in the 1870s, it closed.
Source: A History of Scottish Congregationalism, by Harry Escott. Glasgow: Congregational Union of Scotland, 1960. FHL British Book 941 K2es. . Includes list of ministers

Records—
Extent of records is unknown. For information write to:
The United Reformed Church, Scottish Synod Office
PO Box 189
240 Cathedral Street
Glasgow G1 2BX
Scotland

Keith Methodist Church

History—
The chapel was bought in 1776; it was sold in 1839.

Records—
Extent of records is unknown. For information write to:
Methodist Archives and Research Centre
John Rylands University Library of Manchester
150 Deansgate
Manchester M3 3EH
England

St. Thomas Roman Catholic Church

History—
It was dedicated to St. Thomas in 1831.
Source: Catholic Missions and Registers, 1700–1880, Scotland, by Michael Gandy, pub. 1993. FHL Brit Ref. Book 942K24gm, vol. 6.

Records—
Registers of Births: 1836–1864.
Registers of Marriages: 18361864.
Confirmations: 1840–1855.
Easter Communicants: 1849–1855.
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland, record RH21/27

Keith Episcopal Church

History—
According to the 1851 census, there were a total of 500 people attending services in four churches within the county. No other history is available. See also Banff, Fordyce, and Rathven parishes.

Records—
Registers of Christenings: 1801–1854 - in the hands of the incumbent
Registers of Marriages: 1851–1854 - in the hands of the incumbent
For more information contact the minister at:
All Saints House
14 Cluny Square
Buckie AB56 1HA
Scotland


 

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  • This page was last modified on 28 August 2008, at 07:30.
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