Kirkcaldy Nonconformist Church RecordsEdit This Page

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A nonconformist church is any church that is not the Established church. Read more about nonconformity in Scotland in the article on the Scotland Church Records Union List.

Contents

United Presbyterian Churches

Bethelfield Associate Burgher Church

History—
When the parish church of Kirkcaldy became vacant in 1724, several of the parishioners were unhappy about the new minister. When the Secession took place several of them took part in the movement, but having no minister near them who avowed similar sentiments, they were obliged to continue their attendance at the Establish Church. In 1736 a number of them, over a hundred, declared their accession to the Associate Presbytery and were recognized as in fellowship with it. In 1737 they asked the Associate Presbytery to be taken under their inspection which was granted. Sermon was supplied irregularly. That same year the parish minister of Abbotshall and a number of his parishioners seceded from the Established Church and joined the Associate Presbytery. However the Kirkcaldy seceders did not want to be united with those in Abbotshall and still wanted a minister of their own, but as no minister was supplied, the two congregations united in 1742. Their first church was built in 1740. At the Breach in 1747 the congregation was divided. The part adhering to the General Associate Anti-burgher Synod formed the congregation in Pathhead (see below). The part adhering to the Associate Burgher Synod retained the original church building. A second church was built in 1836 and called Bethelfield.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details may be given in the source.

See also the history of the church at Abbotshall parish.

Records—
Baptismal Register 1852–1861
3 Proclamations of Marriage 1836–1838
Marriages 1856–1861
Minutes 1807–1901
Manager’s Minutes 1797–1910
Accounts 1799–1845
Assistance Fund Committee Minutes 1849–1856
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/846.


Pathhead General Associate, Anti-burgher Church

History—
This congregation originated with the minority of the congregation of Bethelfield who adhered to the General Associate Anti-burgher Synod at the Breach in 1747, and built themselves a place of worship at the East Bridge, Kirkcaldy, in 1748. They built a second church in 1763 and called it Pathhead. The minister and most of the congregation were against the union of the two great branches of the secession in 1820 and remained apart from it, retaining the church property. The congregation was a part of the Synod of Original Seceders until 1852 when they, along with the majority of that Synod, joined the Free Church. It was then called Dunnikier Free Church.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details may be given in the source including ministers

Records—
Partly as Pathhead Associate Church and partly as Dunnikier Free Church
Baptisms 1760–1876 - with gaps
Deaths 1839–1880
Various Minutes 1743–1854
Afternoon Collection Book 1843–1870
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/1144.


Union United Presbyterian Church

History—
This congregation originated with the minority of the congregation of Pathhead, Kirkcaldy, who joined in the Union of the two great branches of the Secession in 1820, to which the minister and the majority of the congregation were opposed. They built a place of worship for themselves at the east end of Kirkcaldy, and from the circumstances, in which the congregation originated, designated it Union Church.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details may be given in the source including ministers.

Records—
Various Minutes 1821–1928
Account Book 1821–1914
Communion Rolls 1852–1927
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/197.


Free Presbyterian Churches

Dunnikier Free Church

History—
The congregation represents the Anti-burgher section of the Linktown congregation of Seceders from which a large minority seceded at the union of the Anti-burgher and Burgher synods in 1820. It joined the Free Church in 1852. The church had been built in 1763. The manse was in Townsend Place. A new manse was acquired at Old Dunnikier House, Pathhead.
Membership: 1859–241; 1900, 415.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including ministers.

Records—
Deacon’s Court Minutes 1852–1873
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/1143.

Note: For records of Kirkcaldy, Pathhead Anti-burgher Church, which joined the Free Church as Dunnikier Free Church in 1852, see CH3/1144 above.


Invertiel Free Church

History—
The minister of this Church Extension charge with a considerable congregation adhered to the Free Church in 1843. They were not deprived of the building until 1856.
Membership: 1848, 330; 1900, 355.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D.2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details may be given in the source.

Records—
Minutes 1843–1982
Other post-1855 records
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/1455.


Pathhead Free Church

History—
The minister of this Church Extension charge with his congregation adhered to the Free Church in 1843. After about nine months they were deprived of the building and were afforded the use of the Secession church until their own was opened in May 1844. The manse was built in 1849. The church walls were heightened, and the galleries put in, in 1856. A church hall was added in 1873. The manse was sold in 1897 and a new one purchased on Lougborough Road.
Membership: 1848, 415; 1900, 565.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D. 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including ministers.

Records—
Minutes 1840–1911 “Church of Scotland” 1840–1843
Deacon’s Court Minutes 1844–1909
Communion Rolls 1842–1898
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/873.


St. Brycedale Free Church

History—
The minister of the parish and a large congregation came out in 1843. The Secession congregation of Cowan Street or Port Brae, which joined the Church of Scotland in 1839 also came out and joined with this congregation. They worshiped in Port Brae quoad sacra church until November 1844 when the Tolbooth Church was opened. The first manse was built in 1851. A new manse was erected in 1873. A new church was built in 1881 on a site gifted by Provost Swan, of St. Brycedale House; hence it was called St. Brycedale. The development of Kirkcaldy in manufactures and commerce brought a great increase of population.
Membership: 1848, 570; 1900, 893.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D.2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details may be given in the source.

Records—
The extent of pre-1855 records is unknown.

Other Nonconformist Churches

Cowan Street Chapel, later West End and Pathhead Congregational Church

History—
In 1798 a few individuals of various religious bodies in Kirkcaldy who had become dissatisfied with their own denominations united together in worship after the Congregational teachings they had heard preached at the Circus in Edinburgh. There was no formal constitution of the church, but it became known in the district as the Tow Kirk. In 1803 they built a chapel on Cowan Street which became known as the Tabernacle. The present church building in High Street was opened for public worship in April 1874, and in 1896 when the Congregational Union and the Evangelical Union amalgamated, the name became the West End Congregational Church. A second church was formed in 1867 in Pathhead by friends of the Evangelical Union. The church joined that body in 1871. A Church building was erected in Commercial Street in 1870.
Source: A History of Scottish Congregationalism, by Harry Escott, pub. 1960. FHL book 941 K2es. Source includes a list of ministers.

Records—
The extent of pre-1855 records is unknown. For more information write to:
The United Reformed Church, Scottish Synod Office
PO Box 189
240 Cathedral Street
Glasgow G1 2BX, Scotland

 

Baptist Churches

History—
The first Baptist meeting in Kirkcaldy owed its origin, about 1786, to the testimony and influence of a Baptist mole catcher who had come to work on the Raith Estate. Though the number was never large, they maintained a weekly meeting. In 1798 the church was set in order. They leased a place of worship. The first minister, served for 40 years.
In 1852, twenty four members including an elder and three deacons withdrew from the Kirkcaldy congregation and formed Whytescauseway Baptist Church, and built a church in 1854.
Source: History of the Baptists in Scotland, by Rev. Geo. Yuille, pub. 1926. FHL book 941 K2hi. Names of ministers are included

Records—
The extent of pre-1855 records is unknown. Write to:
Baptist Union of Scotland
12 Aytoun Road
Glasgow G41 5RT
Scotland


St. Peters Scottish Episcopal Church

History—
The church was established about 1813 and the chapel was built that year.

Records—
Births and Baptisms 1812–1858
Marriages 1813–1852 (with gaps)
Manager’s Minutes 1839–1858
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH12/8.

  
Our Lady of Perpetual Succour Roman Catholic Church

History—
The church was organized in 1846 and the chapel consecrated in 1865.

Records—                                                                               Family History Library Book Number
Marriage 1847-1855 (159 entries)                                                       941.33 B4f, No. 22

Births and Baptisms 1840-1854 This volume has more in it               941.33 B4f, No. 23
RH21/84/1

These volumes can be purchased through the Fife Family History Society.

Note: Try online for a fee, but could be incomplete at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk,


Kirkcaldy Branch, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter–Day Saints

History—  Unavailable.

Records—                                   FHL Film Number
Record of members 1842–1849      0104154 item 6


[Return to Kirkcaldy parish page.]


 

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  • This page was last modified on 30 May 2013, at 19:21.
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