Michigan County Births (FamilySearch Historical Records)Edit This Page

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FamilySearch Record Search This article describes a collection of historical records scheduled to become available at FamilySearch.org.

Contents

Record Description

The records are for the years 1867 to 1910.

The collection consists of images of county birth records from 53 of the 83 county courthouses in Michigan. Some of the records are "delayed births" which were recorded years after the actual birth. The time period varies by county.

Clerks of each County Court recorded births that were reported by parents, doctors and midwives beginning in 1867. This information was then sent to the secretary of the state. From 1867 to 1879, about 15% to 20% of the births were recorded; from 1880-1902, coverage increased to about 60% to 70%. The state required counties to begin recording births to document the occurrence of a birth and to track public health issues.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints sponsored the indexing of this collection to help individuals find information about their ancestors.

Information on birth records is generally reliable, though there is always the chance of misinformation or transcription errors.

Citation for This Collection

The following citation refers to the original source of the data and images published on FamilySearch.org. It may include the author, custodian, publisher and archive for the original records.

County Courthouses. County Births, 1867-1910. Various County Clerks in Michigan.

Suggested citation format for a record in this collection.

Record Content

The key genealogical facts found in birth or christening index entries may include:

  • Name of the child
  • Gender
  • Names of the parents
  • Birth date
  • Birthplace
  • Race
  • Christening date (if the source is a church record)
  • Family History Library Microfilm and item numbers for the source materials

How to Use the Record

To search the collection, select "Browse through images" on the initial collection page ⇒ Select the “County” ⇒ Select the “Record Type, Date Range and Volume” which takes you to the images.

Look at the images one by one comparing the information with what you already know about your ancestors to determine which one is your ancestor. You may need to compare the information about more than one person to make this determination.

To begin your search it is helpful to know the following:

  • Name of the child
  • Approximate birth date and place
  • Parents names

Search the Collection

To search the collection you will need to follow this series of links:
⇒Select the "Browse" link in the initial search page
⇒Select the "County"
⇒Select the "Record Type, Date Range and Volume" which will take you to the images.

Look at the images one by one comparing the information with what you already know about your ancestors to determine which one is your ancestor. You may need to compare the information about more than one person to make this determination.

Using the Information

When you have located your ancestor’s birth record, carefully evaluate each piece of information about them. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors. For example:

  • Use the birth date along with the place of birth to find the family in census records.
  • Use the residence and names of the parents to locate church and land records.
  • The father’s occupation can lead you to employment records or other types of records such as military records.
  • The parent’s birth places can tell you former residences and can help to establish a migration pattern for the family.

It is often helpful to extract the information on all children with the same parents. If the surname is unusual, you may want to compile birth entries for every person of the same surname and sort them into families based on the names of the parents. Continue to search the birth records to identify siblings, parents, and other relatives in the same or other generations who were born in the same county or nearby.

Tips to Keep in Mind

  • The information in birth records is usually reliable, but depends upon the reliability of the informant.
  • Earlier records may not contain as much information as the records created after the late 1800s.
  • There is also some variation in the information given from record to record.
  • If you are unable to find your ancestor check for variant spellings of the surnames.

Related Websites

Related Wiki Articles

Michigan Vital Records

Contributions to This Article

We welcome user additions to FamilySearch Historical Records wiki articles. Guidelines are available to help you make changes. Thank you for any contributions you may provide. If you would like to get more involved join the WikiProject FamilySearch Records.

Citation Example for a Record Found in This Collection

"Michigan, County Births, 1867-1953," images, FamilySearch (https://ds.familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-25517-5687-61?cc=1923472&wc=MMMD-Q1J:2115057657 : accessed 7 August 2012), St Clair > Births 1890-1895 vol 6 > image 1 of 119, Ada R. Thomson, born June 23, 1893; citing County Courthouses. County Births, 1867-1910. Various County Clerks in Michigan.


 

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  • This page was last modified on 20 August 2014, at 21:00.
  • This page has been accessed 772 times.