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Three Arch Rocks National Wildlife Refuge - Oregon
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Most archives, historical societies, and genealogical societies have special collections and indexes of genealogical value. Usually these must be searched in person.

A notable genealogical collection is the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Collection. This collection consists of transcripts of Bible, cemetery, church, marriage, death, obituary, and will records. It was microfilmed in 1971 at the DAR Library in Washington, D.C., and is available on 33 reels FHL Collection for the DAR - Oregon. The volumes are arranged by county, and many volumes have individual indexes.

Many of the current genealogical societies in Oregon can be identified by an internet search with one of the many search engines using terms such as Oregon Genealogy.

Searchable sites

A wiki article describing an online collection is found at:

Oregon, Columbia County Records (FamilySearch Histoical Records)

Early Oregonians Database

EARLY OREGONIANS DATABASE ADDED TO STATE ARCHIVES WEBSITE

As a legacy to commemorate the sesquicentennial of Oregon’s statehood, the Oregon State Archives announces the launch of the Early
Oregonians Database on its website

This resource uses data from census, death, probate, and other records to help researchers find information and documents about people who lived in Oregon prior to statehood. Volunteers at the Archives have worked on this project for more than five years. The database currently contains over 105,500 entries for individuals who lived in Oregon prior to statehood. Because of limits on available records and documentation, the project can be defined to include people living in Oregon from 1800 to 1860.

The foundation of information in the database is based on data extracted from the 1850 and 1860 censuses for Oregon. Volunteers have created profiles of individuals that capture information about their parents, spouses, and birth and death information. When possible additional information from records in the Archives holdings and other published sources have been used to provide more complete or accurate information.

Various records from the Oregon State Archives such as probate records, death certificates, and marriage records were searched to identify individuals who appeared to meet the criteria. As additional features of the database become functional, researchers will be able to view a list of records associated with a particular individual that are part of the Oregon State Archives holdings and request copies.

Despite the fact that large populations of Native Americans lived in the Oregon Country prior to 1840, documentation of those individuals is scant and not readily available. Because of this, Native Americans presented a special challenge. Currently the database includes close to 3,500 individuals of Native American descent. Information on Native Americans that lived into the twentieth century can be problematic as well. Project volunteers are beginning to work on the Indian censuses compiled for the various reservations between 1885 and 1940 with the goal of incorporating more information and individuals in the project over time.

Further review and editing will result in additional entries when evidence supports inclusion in the database. If you have documentation you would like to contribute to the Early Oregonians Database, contact the Archives staff at Early.Oregonians@state.or.us A more detailed description of the project and an FAQ are available at http://arcweb.sos.state.or.us/eo_overview.html and http://arcweb.sos.state.or.us/eo_faqs.html

Writing and Sharing Your Family History

Sharing your own family history is valuable for several reasons:

  • It helps you see gaps in your own research and raises opportunities to find new information.
  • It helps other researchers progress in researching ancestors you share in common.
  • It draws other researchers to you who already have information about your family that you do not yet possess.
  • It draws together researchers with common interests, sparking collaboration opportunities. For instance, researchers in various localities might choose to do lookups for each other in remote repositories. Your readers may also share photos of your ancestors that you have never seen before.
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  • This page was last modified on 18 July 2014, at 23:42.
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