Richland County, South Carolina Land and PropertyEdit This Page

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United States Gotoarrow.png South Carolina Gotoarrow.png Richland County Gotoarrow.png Land and Property

Because of South Carolina’s history as an agricultural state many residents owned land. For more information about types of land records see South Carolina Land and Property.

Tracing records through South Carolina county and district changes can be difficult. In general, for earliest records begin by searching the Charleston District, then your ancestor’s residential district, then neighboring districts, then the residential county, then neighboring counties. Not all districts and counties kept records. The following chart show where you may best expect to find land records for Richland County:


Tracing Land Currently in Richland County with Parent Counties and Districts [1]
Date Government Office  
1868-present Richland County (new)
1865-1868 Richland District
1800-1865 Richland District Records Destroyed **
1785-1800 Richland County(old) Records Destroyed **
1769-1785 Camden District *
1719-1769 Charleston District
1710-1719 Proprietary Land Grants
 

* Some Camden District records are included with Kershaw County records ** Substitute for lost records taken from equity suits Plats For State Land Grants 1784-1868

This series consists of recorded copies of plats for state land grants for the Charleston and the Columbia Series with their certificates of admeasurement or certification.  All personal names and geographic features on these plats are included in the repository's On-line Index to Plats for State Land Grants

The South Carolina Constitution of 1790 required the surveyor general to maintain offices in both the new capital at Columbia and in Charleston. The surveyor general began to use separate volumes for recording plats in his Columbia office in 1796. Before that, all plats were recorded in the set of volumes begun in Charleston in 1784. After 1796, most plats for land grants in the Upper Division of the state were recorded and filed in Columbia. The surveyor general chose to make the Columbia volumes a continuation of the state plat volumes begun in Charleston and gave the initial Columbia volume the number thirty-six to correspond with the number of the volume that had then been reached in the Charleston series. As a result, there are volumes numbered thirty-six through forty-three from each office, but the records in them are not duplicative.

Also included are the Plan Books containing Plats and Plans.

References

  1. Schweitzer, George K. , South Carolina Genealogical Research (Knoxville, Tennessee: s.p. 1985), 39-42, FHL book 975.7 D27s

 

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  • This page was last modified on 1 November 2012, at 14:23.
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