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Contents

1st through 38th

  • 12th Battalion, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Organized with four companies during May, 1862. Because the companies did not always serve together, the history of each is given under its own designation. They are: Company A (1st) - Brooke's Battery; Company A (2nd) - Sturdivant's Battery; Company B - Martin's Battery; Company C - Eubank's-Taylor's Battery; and Company D - Harrington Light Artillery (assigned to the 13th North Carolina Artillery Battalion in November, 1863.)
    Associated unit:
    Martin's Battery was organized in April, 1862, with men from North Carolina and Virginia. For a time it was attached to the 12th Battalion Virginia Artillery. Later the men from North Carolina were transferred to the 13th North Carolina Artillery Battalion.
  • 13th Battalion, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Was formed late in 1863 with three companies. Because the companies did not always served together, the history of each is given under its own designation. They are: Company A - Otey's-Walker's Battery; Company B - Ringgold Light Artillery; and Company C - Davidson's-Chamberlyne's Battery.
    Associated units:
    Ringgold Light Artillery was organized in February, 1862. It was attached to the 13th Battalion Virginia Artillery but for some time operated as an independent command. The battery was then attached to W.H. Gibbes’ Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia, participated in the defense of Petersburg, and ended the war at Appomattox as infantry.
    Davidson's-Chamberlayne's Battery was assembled in April, 1862, with men from Southwestern Virginia, Tennessee, and Kentucky. It was attached to the 13th Battalion Virginia Artillery, but served as an independent command.
    It disbanded early in 1865.
  • 18th Battalion, Virginia Heavy Artillery (Confederate)
    Was organized in June, 1862, with men from Norfolk and Alexandria, and Southampton, Isle of Wight, and York counties. In April, 1865, the unit was assigned to Barton's Brigade as infantry.
    It surrendered with 2 officers and 23 men.
    Predecessor unit:
    Alexandria Light Artillery was organized in March, 1861, and mustered into Confederate service in April. Was assigned to C.E. Lightfoot's Battalion in the Department of Richmond.
    In January, 1864, the company was dismounted and merged into the 18th Battalion Virginia Heavy Artillery.
  • 38th Battalion, Virginia Light Artillery (Read's) (Confederate)
    38th Artillery Battalion contained four companies and was organized in June, 1863. The unit did not serve as one command but did participate in many campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia. Its companies were the Fauquier Light Artillery, the Richmond Fayette Light Artillery, the Hampden Light Artillery, and Latham's-Blount's Battery. See history of each unit for details.
    Associated units:
    Hampden Light Artillery:
    Hampden Light Artillery was organized at Richmond, Virginia, in May, 1861 , with men from Richmond. After serving in Jackson's Valley Campaign,it was assigned to R.S. Andrews', J.Dearing's, H.P. Jones', J.P.W. Read's (38th Battalion), and R.M. Stribling's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia. Participated in the defense of Petersburg,
    Ended the war at Appomattox.

Latham's-Blount's Battery:

Latham's-Blount's Battery completed its organization at Lynchburg, Virginia, in April, 1861. After taking an active part in the Battle of First Manassas, the unit was assigned to J. Dearing's, H.P. Jones', J.P.W. Read's (38th Battalion), and R.M. Stribling's Battalion of Artillery.

It surrendered at Appomattox with only 3 men. Captains Joseph G. Blount, James Dearing, James W. Dickerson, and J.Grey Latham were in command.

Fauquier Light Artillery:

Fauquier Light Artillery was organized as infantry in June, 1861, and assigned to the 49th Regiment Virginia Infantry as Company G (1st). In September or October it transferred to the artillery. Attached to the Army of Northern Virginia the unit served in J. Dearing's, J.P.W. Read's (38th Battalion), and R.M. Stribling's Battalion of Artillery.

Sustained 9 casualties at Kelly’s Ford, and surrendered with only 3 men.

A through G

  • Amherst Artillery, see Kirkpatrick's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Amherst Artillery)(Confederate)
  • Associated unit: (Confederate)
    Giles Light Artillery [also called Pearisburg Reserves] was organized in June, 1861, with men raised in Giles County.
    The company took part in the Appomattox Campaign and surrendered with no officers and 66 men.
  • Barr's Company, Virginia Light Artillery Levi's Battery (Confederate)
    [also called Louisiana Tigers] was organized in October, 1862, as part of Thomas' North Carolina Legion. It contained men from Louisiana, Tennessee, North Carolina, and the disbanded troops of the Virginian State Line.
    In March, 1865, it rejoined Thomas' Legion in the District of Western North Carolina and surrendered in May.
  • Carpenter's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Alleghany Rough Artillery) (Confederate) Alleghany Light Artillery was organized at Covington, Virginia, in April, 1861, with 83 officers and men. It was also called Alleghany Roughs, and later Carpenter's Battery. Joined the Army of Northern Virginia. Here it served in R.S. Andrews', J.W. Latimer's, and C.M. Braxton's Battalion of Artillery.
    Many were captured at Five Forks, and only 1 man surrendered on April 9, 1865.
  • Clutter's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Johnson's-Clutter's Battery [also called Jackson's Flying Artillery] was organized at Richmond, Virginia, during March, 1862, with men from Richmond.
    The battery had 96 men at Gettysburg and surrendered with 1 officer and 55 men.
  • Courtney Artillery, Virginia (Henrico Artillery) (Confederate)
    Courtney Light Artillery, recruited in Henrico County, was organized during June, 1861. After participating in Jackson's Valley Campaign it was assigned to A.R. Courtney's, H.P. Jones', and W.E. Cutshaw's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    It disbanded early in 1865.
  • Dance's Company, Virginia Artillery (Powhatan Artillery) (Confederate)
    Powhatan Light Artillery was organized in July, 1861, with men raised in Powhatan County. The unit served in the Army of Northern Virginia assigned to J.T. Brown's and R.A. Hardaway's Battalion of Artillery.
    Many were captured at Sayler's Creek on April 6, 1865. Only 1 man surrendered with the army.
  • Donald's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Rockbridge Light Artillery No. 2 was organized as infantry served in the 52nd Regiment. All the officers and men were raised in Rockbridge County. In September, 1861, the company transferred to the artillery.
    At Gettysburg, it surrendered 1 officer and 27 men.
  • Drewry's Company, Virginia Artillery (Southside Artillery) (Confederate)
    Southside Light Artillery was organized in January, 1862, with men from Chesterfield County. It was assigned to the 2nd Regiment Virginia Artillery and when that unit disbanded, it became an independent command.
    Converted to infantry, the company ended the war at Appomattox where 1 officer and 67 men surrendered.
  • Fleet's Company, Virginia Artillery (Middlesex Artillery) (Confederate)
    Middlesex Light Artillery was organized as an infantry company in May, 1861. It served as Company K (1st) in the 47th Regiment, then became Company B of the 55th Regiment. During February, 1862, it was transferred to the artillery.
    The unit served with the Army of Northern Virginia until after the Maryland Campaign, then in October disbanded. The men transferred to the Ashland Light Artillery and Jackson's Flying Artillery.
  • Fry's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Orange Artillery) (Confederate)
    Orange Light Artillery was formed at Richmond, Virginia, in May, 1861. After serving in the Department of the Peninsula, it was assigned to H.P. Jones', T.H. Carter's, R.C.M. Page's , and W.E. Cutshaw's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    Ended the war at Appomattox and surrendered with 20 men.
  • Grandy's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Norfolk Light Artillery Blues) (Confederate)
    Norfolk Blues Light Artillery was formed in 1828 and placed on active duty in April, 1861, as Company H (1st), 16th Regiment Virginia Infantry. During March, 1862, it was transferred to the artillery. The unit was assigned to J.J. Garnett's and C. Richardson's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    This battery took 106 effectives into the fight at Gettysburg and surrendered on April 9, 1865, with 1 Warrant-Officer and 13 men.
  • Griffin's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Salem Flying Artillery) (Confederate)
    Salem Flying Artillery was organized as an infantry company and served with the 9th Regiment. In May, 1862, it was transferred to the artillery. All of its members were recruited to Roanoke County. The unit was assigned to J.T. Brown's and R.A. Hardaway's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered 1 officer and 97 men.

H through P

  • Hankins' Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Surry Light Artillery) (Confederate)
    Surry Light Artillery was organized as infantry and assigned to the 3rd Regiment Virginia Infantry. During April, 1862, it was transferred to the artillery. The unit was assigned to the Richmond defenses and later to C.E. Lightfoot's Battalion, Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia.
    It ended the war at Appomattox with 19 men.
  • Jackson's Battalion, Light Artillery, Virginia State Line (Confederate)
    Jackson Light Artillery was organized at Winchester, Virginia, during March, 1862. It was active in Jackson's Valley Campaign, then served with the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days' Battles to Sharpsburg.
    In September the unit was mustered out of service and the men joined in the Alleghany Light Artillery.
  • Jackson's Company, Virginia Horse Artillery (2nd Organization 1863-65) (Confederate)
    Jackson's Battery [also called Charlottesville Horse Battery] was organized in May, 1863, with men from John P. Hale's Battery which was broken up by its capture at Fort Donelson in February, 1862, and recruits and transfers principally from the 8th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. It was assigned to Jenkins' Cavalry Brigade, Lomax's Horse Artillery Battalion, and in 1865, M. Johnson's Battalion. This unit took 54 men to Gettysburg, then served in southwest Virginia and in Early's Shenandoah Valley operations. In March, 1865, it moved to North Carolina.
  • J.R. Johnson's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Bowyer's-Johnson's Battery, recruited in Bedford County, was organized in May, 1861, as an infantry company. Assigned to the 28th Regiment, it was transferred to the artillery in August.
    On October 4, 1862, it disbanded and its 52 men were equally distributed to the Purcell and Fauquier Light Artillery Companies.
  • Kevill's Company, Virginia Artillery (United Artillery) (Confederate)
    United Light Artillery was organized as infantry and attached to the 41st Regiment. All of its members were recruited in Norfolk County. During April, 1862, it was transferred to the artillery and assigned to the 19th Battalion Virginia Artillery. In June it was detached and placed in the Richmond defenses.
    Ended the war at Appomattox with 1 officer and 29 men.
  • L.F. Jones' Company, Virginia Artillery (2nd Company, Richmond Howitzers) (Confederate)
    Richmond Howitzers 2nd Company was organized in May, 1861, and for a time served in the 1st Regiment Virginia Artillery. After becoming an independent command, it was assigned to J.T. Brown's, R.A. Hardaway's, and W.E. Cutshaw's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    It took 64 effectives to Gettysburg and surrendered with 1 officer and 45 men.
  • Montgomery's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Morris Light Artillery [also called Louisa Battery] was organized during August, 1861. The unit was assigned to W. Nelson's, H.P. Jones', T.H. Carter's, R.C.M. Page's, and W.E. Cutshaw's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    It surrendered 31 men on April 9, 1865.
  • Moore's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Huger's-Moore's Battery was organized in June, 1861, with men from Norfolk, Virginia. After serving in the Department of Norfolk, the unit was assigned to J.J. Garnett's and C. Richardson's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    This battery took 77 men to Gettysburg but surrendered only 3.
  • Parker's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Parker's Battery completed its organization at Richmond, Virginia, in March, 1862. It served in S.D. Lee's, E.P. Alexander's, and J.C. Huger's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    The company was included in the surrender on April 9, 1865, but only 3 members were present. Captains J.T. Brown, Jr. and William W. Parker were its commanders.
  • Pegram's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Branch Field Artillery)Branch's (Confederate)
    Pegram's Battery was organized in May, 1861, with men from Petersburg, Virginia. It first served as infantry with the 16th Regiment, then was transferred to the artillery in March, 1862. The company was assigned to J.R. Branch's and J.C. Coit's Battalion of Artillery.
    Almost every member was captured in the battle of Sayler's Creek. Captains James R. Branch and Richard G. Pegram were in command
  • Penick's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Lewis' Battery [also called Pittsylvania Artillery] was organized during April, 1862. For a time, part of this company served with the 59th Virginia Regiment. It was assigned to J.J. Garnett's, C.Richardson's, and W.T. Poague's Battalion of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia.
    In April, 1865, it surrendered 2 officers and 68 men. The battery was commanded by Captains John W. Lewis and Nathan Penick.
  • Price's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Danville Artillery) (Confederate)
    Danville Light Artillery was organized at Danville, Virginia, during April, 1861, with men from Pittsylvania County. It participated in Lee's Cheat Mountain Campaign and Jackson's Valley operations, then served in L.M. Shumaker's and D.G. McIntosh's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered 4 officers and 79 men. Captains Berryman Z. Price, R. Sidney Rice, Lindsay M. Shumaker, and George W. Wooding were its commanders.

R through Z

  • Richardson's Company, Virginia Artillery (James City Artillery) (Confederate)
    James City Light Artillery was organized as infantry during the summer of 1861 and became Company H of the 32nd Virginia Infantry. Later it was transferred to the 1st Regiment Virginia Artillery as Company B.
    Early in 1865 the battery ceased to exist, but 2 of its members surrendered at Appomattox. Captains Alex Hankins and Lucien W. Richardson were in command.
  • Rives' Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Nelson Light Artillery)(Confederate)
    Nelson Light Artillery No. 2 was organized during August, 1861, with men from Nelson County. This battery was assigned to A.W. Stark's, J.M. Maury's, and C.E. Lightfoot's Battalion, Department of Richmond.
    In July, 1862, it contained 2 officers and 69 men, but only 2 were present at the surrender. Captain J. Henry Rives was in command.
  • Rogers' Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Loudoun Artillery) (Confederate)
    Loudon Light Artillery was organized in 1859 as part of the Virginia militia and entered Confederate service in July, 1861.
    In October the company was ordered to disband, and 61 men were transferred to the Morris Light Artillery and 28 to the Orange Battery. Captains Patrick H. Clark and Abram Wimbish were in command.
  • Shoemaker's Company, Virginia Horse Artillery (Beauregard Rifles) (Confederate)
    (Lynchburg Beauregards)Moorman's-Shoemaker's Battery [also called Lynchburg Horse Artillery or Bearegard's Rifles] was organized at Lynchburg, Virginia, in April, 1861. The unit was assigne to J.S. Saunder's, J. Pelham's, R.F. Beckham's, and J. Breathed's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia.
    Disbanded at Lynchburg on April 9, 1865. Its commanders were Captains Macellus N. Moorman and John J. Shoemaker.
  • Sturdivant's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Sturdivant's Battery [also called Albemarle Artillery] was organized in March, 1862. This unit served as an independent command, but for a time in 1864 was part of the 12th Battalion Virginia Artillery.
    Surrendered 3 officers and 45 men at Appomattox. Captain Nathaniel A. Sturdivant was in command.
  • Taylor's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Eubank's-Taylor's Battery [also called Bath Artillery] was organized in March, 1862. It was assigned to the 12th Battalion Virginia Artillery, but became an independent company in August, 1862.
    On April 9, 1865, it was included in the surrender. Captains John L. Eubank and Osmond B. Taylor were in command.
  • Turner's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    Turner Light Artillery was organized in August, 1861, with men from Goochland County.
    During October it was ordered to disband. Its 48 men were transferred to the King William Light Artillery. Captain Walter D. Leake was its commander.
  • Utterback's Company, Virginia Light ArtilleryBrook’s Battery (Confederate)
    [also called Warrenton Light Artillery] was organized in April, 1862. The company was assigned to the 12th Battalion Virginia Artillery, then in August became an independent command.
    On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 3 officers and 37 men. Captains James V. Brooke and Addison W. Utterback were in command.
  • W.P. Carter's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Confederate)
    King William Light Artillery was formed in the spring of 1861 with men raised in King William County. The battery served in T.H. Carter's, R.C.M. Page's, and W.E. Cutshaw's Battalion of Artillery.
    It surrendered with 1 officer and 22 men. Captains Thomas H. Carter and William P. Carter were its commanders.
  • Wimbish's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Long Island Light Artillery) (Confederate)
    Long Island Light Artillery, recruited in Campbell County, was organized in March, 1862. It was attached to H.P. Jones' Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia,
    In October the company was ordered to disband, and 61 men were transferred to the Morris Light Artillery and 28 to the Orange Battery. Captains Patrick H. Clark and Abram Wimbish were in command.
  • Young's Company, Virginia Artillery (Halifax Light Artillery) (Confederate)
    Young's Battery [also called Halifax Artillery] was formed during the early spring of 1861 with men from Halifax County. It served as infantry with the 14th Regiment until May, 1862, when it transferred to the 1st Battalion, then the 1st Regiment Virginia Artillery.
    Surrendered on April 9, 1865, attached to J.G. Blount's Battalion. Captain Edward R. Young was in command.

References

  1. Confederate Regimental Information, Virginia, Artillery, Cavalry, Infantry Regimental Histories, 3rd Artillery Regiment, (accessed 26 September 2012).

 

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  • This page was last modified on 30 October 2012, at 20:31.
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