Y genealogical glossary termsEdit This Page

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Y

Year's support
  • Financial support provided from a husband's estate for the care of his widow and her children. Also called 12-months support.
Yearbook, school
  • A book compiled annually by a graduating class that serves as a record of class members and of events that occurred during the school year.
Yearbook, societies
  • A book or report published annually that details the members and activities of a society during a particular year.
Yeomanry, Great Britain
  • A volunteer cavalry force that Great Britain used in 1761 as a home defense. The yeomanry was reorganized in 1907 as part of the territorial force.
Yuit
  • Another name for Eskimos, a group of people who live in the Arctic regions of Alaska, Canada, Siberia, the Islands in the Bering Sea, and Greenland. Most scientists believe these groups originated in northeast Asia and that they crossed a land bridge into North America 10,000 years ago. Eskimo, meaning eaters of raw meat, is an Indian term for this people. They call themselves by different names, each of which means people. In Canada they call themselves Inuit. In Alaska they call themselves Inupiat or Yuipic. In Siberia and the St. Lawrence Island of western Alaska, they call themselves Yuit.
Yupic
  • Another name for Eskimos, a group of people who live in the Arctic regions of Alaska, Canada, Siberia, the Islands in the Bering Sea, and Greenland. Most scientists believe these groups originated in northeast Asia and that they crossed a land bridge into North America 10,000 years ago. Eskimo, meaning eaters of raw meat, is an Indian term for this people. They call themselves by different names, each of which means people. In Canada they call themselves Inuit. In Alaska they call themselves Inupiat or Yuipic. In Siberia and the St. Lawrence Island of western Alaska, they call themselves Yuit.

 

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  • This page was last modified on 3 April 2009, at 02:14.
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