Avery's Trace

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''[[United States|United States ]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[United States Migration Internal|Migration ]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[US Migration Trails and Roads|Trails and Roads ]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[Avery's_Trace|Avery's Trace]]''  
 
''[[United States|United States ]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[United States Migration Internal|Migration ]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[US Migration Trails and Roads|Trails and Roads ]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[Avery's_Trace|Avery's Trace]]''  
  
'''Avery's Trace''', also called the Nashville Road, was authorized in 1787 to connect Knoxville to Nashville, Tennessee.  
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'''Avery's Trace''', also called the Nashville Road, was authorized in 1787 to connect Knoxville to Nashville, Tennessee.<ref name="DollarM">William Dollarhide, ''[http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/38096564 Map Guide to American Migration Routes 1735-1815]'' (Bountiful, Utah: Heritage Quest, 1997)[[{{DollarhideMigration}}]], 22.</ref><ref name="WikiAvery">Wikipedia contributors, "Avery’s Trace," in ''Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia'' at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avery%27s_Trace (accessed 27 July 2010).</ref>
  
 
=== Historical Background  ===
 
=== Historical Background  ===

Revision as of 15:25, 27 July 2010

United States  Gotoarrow.png  Migration  Gotoarrow.png  Trails and Roads  Gotoarrow.png  Avery's Trace

Avery's Trace, also called the Nashville Road, was authorized in 1787 to connect Knoxville to Nashville, Tennessee.[1][2]

Contents

Historical Background

In 1787 the North Carolina legislature considered Tennessee part of its territory and authorized the blazing of a settlers' trail by Peter Avery, along with 300 soldiers to protect that road. The trail connected East Tennessee (Knoxville) with Middle Tennessee (French Lick, or Nashville).

Route

  • Fort Southwest Point, Kingston, Roane, Tennessee (South end of Clinch Mountain)
  • Fort Blount, Jackson, Tennessee
  • Bledsoe’s Fort, Castalian Springs, Sumner, Tennessee
  • Mansker’s Fort, Goodlettsville, Davidson, Tennessee
  • Fort Nashborough, Nashville, Davidson, Tennessee

Settlers and Records

For partial list of settlers who used the Avery's Trace, see .

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject: Avery's Trace

Internet Sites

Sources

  1. William Dollarhide, Map Guide to American Migration Routes 1735-1815 (Bountiful, Utah: Heritage Quest, 1997)[FHL Ref Book 973 E3d], 22.
  2. Wikipedia contributors, "Avery’s Trace," in Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avery%27s_Trace (accessed 27 July 2010).