Chambly Canal

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''[[Canada]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Quebec]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Chambly_Canal|Chambly Canal]]''  
 
''[[Canada]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Quebec]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Chambly_Canal|Chambly Canal]]''  
  
[[Image:{{CanCha}}]]The [[Chambly_Canal|Chambly Canal]] along the lower part of the Richelieu River helps connect the St. Lawrence River in [[Quebec]] to Lake Champlain in [[Vermont]] and [[New York]]. The canal and its locks allowed boats to bypassed Richelieu River rapids at Chambly and Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. Work began on this canal in 1831 and was completed in 1843. The canal is 12 miles (19 km) long.
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[[Image:{{CanCha}}]]The [[Chambly_Canal|Chambly Canal]] along the lower part of the Richelieu River helps connect the St. Lawrence River in [[Quebec]] to Lake Champlain in [[Vermont]] and [[New York]]. The canal and its locks allowed boats to bypass the Richelieu River rapids at Chambly and Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. Work began on this canal in 1831 and was completed in 1843. The canal is 12 miles (19 km) long.  
  
The Richelieu River in [[Quebec]] flows north from Lake Champlain about 106 miles (171 km) to Sorel-Tracy where it joins the St. Lawrence River.
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The Richelieu River in [[Quebec]] flows north from Lake Champlain about 106 miles (171 km) to Sorel-Tracy where it joins the St. Lawrence River.  
  
 
The Chambly Canal was part of a network of canals, lakes and rivers connecting New York City to the St. Lawrence River. Freight such as lumber and coal could be shipped from the St. Lawrence River, up the Richelieu River and Chambly Canal to Lake Champlain, down the [[Champlain Canal]] to the Hudson River to New York City. This route was opened during a period of increasing Canadian-American trade. After World War I commercial traffic declined, but has partially been replaced since with tourist pleasure cruises.<br>  
 
The Chambly Canal was part of a network of canals, lakes and rivers connecting New York City to the St. Lawrence River. Freight such as lumber and coal could be shipped from the St. Lawrence River, up the Richelieu River and Chambly Canal to Lake Champlain, down the [[Champlain Canal]] to the Hudson River to New York City. This route was opened during a period of increasing Canadian-American trade. After World War I commercial traffic declined, but has partially been replaced since with tourist pleasure cruises.<br>  

Revision as of 22:24, 7 June 2011

Canada Gotoarrow.png Quebec Gotoarrow.png Chambly Canal

Chambly Canal at Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec helps to link the St. Lawrence River to Lake Champlain, thence to New York City.
The Chambly Canal along the lower part of the Richelieu River helps connect the St. Lawrence River in Quebec to Lake Champlain in Vermont and New York. The canal and its locks allowed boats to bypass the Richelieu River rapids at Chambly and Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. Work began on this canal in 1831 and was completed in 1843. The canal is 12 miles (19 km) long.

The Richelieu River in Quebec flows north from Lake Champlain about 106 miles (171 km) to Sorel-Tracy where it joins the St. Lawrence River.

The Chambly Canal was part of a network of canals, lakes and rivers connecting New York City to the St. Lawrence River. Freight such as lumber and coal could be shipped from the St. Lawrence River, up the Richelieu River and Chambly Canal to Lake Champlain, down the Champlain Canal to the Hudson River to New York City. This route was opened during a period of increasing Canadian-American trade. After World War I commercial traffic declined, but has partially been replaced since with tourist pleasure cruises.

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