Italy - Marriage - 1520-1808

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Not all of the Italian civil registry records have been microfilmed, and the beginning date of these records varies from place to place.
 
Not all of the Italian civil registry records have been microfilmed, and the beginning date of these records varies from place to place.
  
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Revision as of 04:54, 9 September 2008

Marriage Record: Church records

The Italian Renaissance flourished during the first half of this period, and churches began keeping birth, marriage, and death records. Spain ruled most of Italy from 1559 until 1713, when the Treaty of Utrecht established the Austrian Hapsburgs as Italy's dominant power. Napoleon Bonaparte, emperor of France, drove the Austrian rulers from northern Italy in 1796, and by 1804, he ruled most of Italy, with one of the exceptions being Sicily. Parish records were not affected by this political turmoil, although the language of the records sometimes was. In 1806, Napoleon required that all communities and provinces under his rule to keep civil registration.

What you are looking for

Most couples were married when they were in their twenties and thirties. Second and third marriages may have occurred anytime after that.

Why go to the next record

Not all of the Italian church marriage records have been microfilmed, and the beginning date of these records varies from place to place.

Marriage Banns: Church records

Beginning about 1520, churches required their clergy to keep marriage records. Marriage banns were also kept. Information found in a marriage bann depends on how detailed the minister made his record. Usually it gives the names of the bride and groom and their parents. It may also give their ages or dates of birth.

What you are looking for

When marriage records do not exist, marriage banns are the best source for determining when a person was born. Marriage banns may not give a birth or baptism date, but they give the age of the bride and groom, making it possible to determine their approximate birth years.

Why go to the next record

Not all of the Italian church marriage banns have been microfilmed, and the beginning date of these records varies from place to place.

Baptism: Church records

Beginning about 1500, churches required their clergy to keep christening (or baptism) records. The records give the names of the parents and the child and include birth dates. Information found in a christening depends on how detailed the minister made his record.

What you are looking for

Civil registers were the best source for determining when a person was born.

Why go to the next record

Not all of the Italian civil registry records have been microfilmed, and the beginning date of these records varies from place to place.