New York, New York, Index to Passenger Lists (FamilySearch Historical Records)Edit This Page

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|CID=CID1919703
 
|CID=CID1919703
 
|title=New York, New York, Index to Passenger Lists, 1820-1846
 
|title=New York, New York, Index to Passenger Lists, 1820-1846
|location=United States}} <br>  
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|location=New York}} <br>  
  
 
== Record Description  ==
 
== Record Description  ==
  
This Collection will include records from 1820 to 1846.<br>
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The collection consists of Card file Index to early New York passenger lists. Corresponds to NARA publication M261: Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York for the years 1820 to 1846.
  
The content of earlier lists, known generally as “customs manifests,” was not regulated. Formats varied widely and a specific place of origin was not always listed. In 1883, the federal government mandated the creation of ship manifests, which included columns for an exact birthplace or last residence. This information was also kept on passenger arrival lists of later periods.
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{{Collection_Browse_Link
 
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|CID=CID1919703
The lists consist of large sheets of paper divided into columns and rows. Earlier lists are handwritten, while most after 1917 are typewritten. Lists after 1906 usually occupy two pages.
+
|title=New York, New York, Index to Passenger Lists, 1820-1846
 
+
}}
These collections also include a card index to passengers arriving in New York City from 1820 through 1846.
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Passenger arrival lists known as customs manifests date back to 1820. However, the first official emigration station for New York was Castle Garden, located at the tip of lower Manhattan. Congressional action in 1891 resulted in federal immigration officials recording the immigrants’ arrival. After January 1892, passengers arriving in New York debarked at Ellis Island, located east of Manhattan in the New York Harbor.&nbsp;From 1892 to 1924, almost all immigrants entered the United States through the port of New York.&nbsp;
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For an alphabetical list of names currently published in this collection, select the [https://familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/collection/1919703/waypoints Browse].
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The passenger arrival list was used by legal inspectors at Ellis Island to cross-examine each immigrant during a legal inspection prior to the person being allowed to live in America. Only two percent of the prospective immigrants were denied entry.
+
 
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The information was supplied by the immigrant or a traveling companion (usually a family member). Incorrect information was occasionally given, or mistakes may have been made when the clerk guessed at the spelling of foreign names.
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=== Citation for This Collection  ===
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The following citation refers to the original source of the information published in FamilySearch.org Historical Records collections. Sources include the author, custodian, publisher, and archive for the original records.<br>
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{{Collection citation| text=<!--bibdescbegin-->United States Immigration and Naturalization Service. New York, New York, index to passenger lists. National Archives, Washington D.C.<!--bibdescend-->}}  
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Digital images of originals housed at various municipal archives throughout New York.
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[[New York, New York, Index to Passenger Lists (FamilySearch Historical Records)#Citation_Example_for_a_Record_Found_in_This_Collection|Suggested citation format for a record in this collection.]]
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== Record Content  ==
 
== Record Content  ==
  
[[Image:New York Index to Passenger Lists (11-0390) DGS 4786591 89.jpg|thumb|right]]
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<gallery>
 +
Image:New York Index to Passenger Lists (11-0390) DGS 4786591 89.jpg|Card Index
 +
</gallery>
  
The card index to passenger lists includes the following information:  
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The card '''index to passenger lists''' includes the following information:  
  
 
*Full name of immigrant  
 
*Full name of immigrant  
Line 47: Line 30:
 
*Name of ship
 
*Name of ship
  
[[Image:Ellis Island Passenger List.jpg|thumb|right]]
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<gallery>
 
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Image:Ellis Island Passenger List.jpg|  
Passenger lists, particularly later lists, include the following genealogical information:  
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</gallery> '''Passenger lists, particularly later lists''', include the following information:  
  
 
*Name of ship and port of departure  
 
*Name of ship and port of departure  
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*Last place of residence in that country  
 
*Last place of residence in that country  
 
*Name of relative or friend living at last residence  
 
*Name of relative or friend living at last residence  
*Name of relative or friend to be visited in this country  
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*Name of relative or friend to be visited in this country Alphabetical Surname Range
 
*Final destination of immigrant  
 
*Final destination of immigrant  
 
*Physical description  
 
*Physical description  
Line 67: Line 50:
 
To begin your search it is helpful to know the full name of your ancestor and the approximate date of immigration. If you do not know this information, check the census records after 1900.  
 
To begin your search it is helpful to know the full name of your ancestor and the approximate date of immigration. If you do not know this information, check the census records after 1900.  
  
==== Search the Collection  ====
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=== Search the Collection  ===
  
To search the collection by name fill in your ancestor’s name in the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches.  
+
To search the collection by name fill in your ancestor’s name in the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about those in the list to what you already know about your own ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person.  
  
Compare the information about the ancestors in the list to what you already know about your ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person. You may need to compare the information about more than one person to find your ancestor.
+
If you did not find the person you were looking for, you may need to search the collection by image. <br>
 +
⇒Select "Browse through images" on the initial collection page <br>
 +
⇒Select the appropriate "Alphabetical Surname Range" category which takes you to the images.  
  
==== Using the Information  ====
+
Look at each image comparing the information with what you already know about your ancestors to determine if the image relates to them. You may need to look at several images and compare the information about the individuals listed in those images to your ancestors to make this determination.
 +
 
 +
With either search keep in mind:
 +
*There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
 +
*You may not be sure of your own ancestor’s name.
 +
*Your ancestor may have used different names or variations of their name throughout their life.
 +
 
 +
For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line article [[FamilySearch Search Tips and Tricks]].
 +
 
 +
=== Using the Information  ===
  
 
When you have located your ancestor’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors. Add this new information to your records of each family. For example, use passenger lists to:  
 
When you have located your ancestor’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors. Add this new information to your records of each family. For example, use passenger lists to:  
Line 82: Line 76:
 
*Find records in his or her country of origin such as emigrations, port records, or ship’s manifests.
 
*Find records in his or her country of origin such as emigrations, port records, or ship’s manifests.
  
==== Tips to Keep in Mind  ====
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=== Tips to Keep in Mind  ===
  
 
*If your ancestor had a common name, be sure to look at all the entries for a name before you decide which is correct.  
 
*If your ancestor had a common name, be sure to look at all the entries for a name before you decide which is correct.  
Line 91: Line 85:
 
*Please note that when you select an image to view, sometimes the manifest includes more than one page, and when you use the "click to enlarge manifest" link, the image that appears is not always the first page of the record. You may need to click on the "previous" or "next" links to view the remaining pages of the full manifest.
 
*Please note that when you select an image to view, sometimes the manifest includes more than one page, and when you use the "click to enlarge manifest" link, the image that appears is not always the first page of the record. You may need to click on the "previous" or "next" links to view the remaining pages of the full manifest.
  
==== Unable to Find Your Ancestor?  ====
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=== Unable to Find Your Ancestor?  ===
  
 
*Check for variant spellings of the name.  
 
*Check for variant spellings of the name.  
Line 97: Line 91:
 
*Search the passenger lists year by year.  
 
*Search the passenger lists year by year.  
 
*Search the indexes of other port cities.
 
*Search the indexes of other port cities.
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 +
{{Tip|Don't overlook {{FHL|New York, Emigration and Immigration|keywords|disp}} items in the FamilySearch Library Catalog. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see the wiki article [[New York Archives and Libraries]]. For additional information about this state see the wiki article [[New York]].}}
 +
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=== General Information About These Records ===
 +
 +
The content of earlier lists, known generally as “customs manifests,” was not regulated. Formats varied widely and a specific place of origin was not always listed. In 1883, the federal government mandated the creation of ship manifests, which included columns for an exact birthplace or last residence. This information was also kept on passenger arrival lists of later periods.
 +
 +
The lists consist of large sheets of paper divided into columns and rows. Earlier lists are handwritten, while most after 1917 are typewritten. Lists after 1906 usually occupy two pages.
 +
 +
These collections also include a card index to passengers arriving in New York City from 1820 through 1846.
 +
 +
Passenger arrival lists known as customs manifests date back to 1820. However, the first official emigration station for New York was Castle Garden, located at the tip of lower Manhattan. Congressional action in 1891 resulted in federal immigration officials recording the immigrants’ arrival. After January 1892, passengers arriving in New York debarked at Ellis Island, located east of Manhattan in the New York Harbor. From 1892 to 1924, almost all immigrants entered the United States through the port of New York.
 +
 +
The passenger arrival list was used by legal inspectors at Ellis Island to cross-examine each immigrant during a legal inspection prior to the person being allowed to live in America. Only two percent of the prospective immigrants were denied entry.
 +
 +
The information was supplied by the immigrant or a traveling companion (usually a family member). Incorrect information was occasionally given, or mistakes may have been made when the clerk guessed at the spelling of foreign names.
  
 
== Related Websites  ==
 
== Related Websites  ==
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{{Contributor invite}}  
 
{{Contributor invite}}  
  
== Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections  ==
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== Citations for This Collection ==
 
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When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.
+
  
A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article [[Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections]].  
+
When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information; that is, cite your sources. This will help people find the record again and evaluate the reliability of the source. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records. Citations are available for the collection as a whole and each record or image individually.
  
=== Citation Example for a Record Found in This Collection ===
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'''Collection Citation''':<br>
 +
{{Collection citation | text= "New York, New York, Index to Passenger Lists, 1820-1846." Index and Images. <i>FamilySearch</i>. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2013. Citing NARA microfilm publication M261. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.}} <br><br>
  
"New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1891," images, ''FamilySearch'' (https://familysearch.org: accessed 29 August 2012), Alphebetical Surname List&gt;Image 1600 of 5091, Joseph Bavillrede, age 18; citing Passenger Lists; United States Immigration and Naturalization Service, Washington, D.C.
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'''Record Citation''' (or citation for the index entry):<br>
 +
{{Record Citation Link
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|CID=CID1919703
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|title=New York, New York, Index to Passenger Lists, 1820-1846
  
[[Category:New_York|Immigration]]
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'''Image citation''':<br>
 +
{{Image Citation Link
 +
|CID=CID1919703
 +
|title=New York, New York, Index to Passenger Lists, 1820-1846
 +
}}

Latest revision as of 22:49, 24 November 2014

FamilySearch Record Search This article describes a collection of historical records available at FamilySearch.org.

Contents

Record Description

The collection consists of Card file Index to early New York passenger lists. Corresponds to NARA publication M261: Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York for the years 1820 to 1846.

You can browse through images in this collection by visiting the browse page for New York, New York, Index to Passenger Lists, 1820-1846.

Record Content

The card index to passenger lists includes the following information:

  • Full name of immigrant
  • Name of person accompanying immigrant
  • Age, gender, race and occupation of immigrant
  • Nationality of immigrant
  • Last permanent residence (town, country)
  • Destination
  • Port of entry and date of arrival
  • Name of ship
Passenger lists, particularly later lists, include the following information:
  • Name of ship and port of departure
  • Ship's arrival date and port of entry
  • Names of immigrants
  • Immigrants' age, gender, marital status and occupation
  • Country where immigrant holds citizenship
  • Last place of residence in that country
  • Name of relative or friend living at last residence
  • Name of relative or friend to be visited in this country Alphabetical Surname Range
  • Final destination of immigrant
  • Physical description
  • Birthplace

How to Use the Records

To begin your search it is helpful to know the full name of your ancestor and the approximate date of immigration. If you do not know this information, check the census records after 1900.

Search the Collection

To search the collection by name fill in your ancestor’s name in the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about those in the list to what you already know about your own ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person.

If you did not find the person you were looking for, you may need to search the collection by image.
⇒Select "Browse through images" on the initial collection page
⇒Select the appropriate "Alphabetical Surname Range" category which takes you to the images.

Look at each image comparing the information with what you already know about your ancestors to determine if the image relates to them. You may need to look at several images and compare the information about the individuals listed in those images to your ancestors to make this determination.

With either search keep in mind:

  • There may be more than one person in the records with the same name.
  • You may not be sure of your own ancestor’s name.
  • Your ancestor may have used different names or variations of their name throughout their life.

For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line article FamilySearch Search Tips and Tricks.

Using the Information

When you have located your ancestor’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors. Add this new information to your records of each family. For example, use passenger lists to:

  • Learn an immigrant’s place of origin
  • Confirm their date of arrival
  • Learn foreign and “Americanized” names
  • Find records in his or her country of origin such as emigrations, port records, or ship’s manifests.

Tips to Keep in Mind

  • If your ancestor had a common name, be sure to look at all the entries for a name before you decide which is correct.
  • Continue to search the passenger lists to identify siblings, parents, and other relatives in the same or other generations who may have immigrated at the same time.
  • If your ancestor has an uncommon surname, you may want to obtain the passenger list of every person who shares your ancestor’s surname if they lived in the same county or nearby. You may not know how or if they are related, but the information could lead you to more information about your own ancestors.
  • Arrival lists was used by legal authorities to gather personal information about immigrants prior to the person being allowed to live in the United States.
  • The information was supplied by the immigrant or a traveling companion (usually a family member). Incorrect information was occasionally given, or mistakes may have been made when the clerk guessed at the spelling of foreign names.
  • Please note that when you select an image to view, sometimes the manifest includes more than one page, and when you use the "click to enlarge manifest" link, the image that appears is not always the first page of the record. You may need to click on the "previous" or "next" links to view the remaining pages of the full manifest.

Unable to Find Your Ancestor?

  • Check for variant spellings of the name.
  • Look for other indexes. Records are often indexed by local historical and genealogical societies.
  • Search the passenger lists year by year.
  • Search the indexes of other port cities.

General Information About These Records

The content of earlier lists, known generally as “customs manifests,” was not regulated. Formats varied widely and a specific place of origin was not always listed. In 1883, the federal government mandated the creation of ship manifests, which included columns for an exact birthplace or last residence. This information was also kept on passenger arrival lists of later periods.

The lists consist of large sheets of paper divided into columns and rows. Earlier lists are handwritten, while most after 1917 are typewritten. Lists after 1906 usually occupy two pages.

These collections also include a card index to passengers arriving in New York City from 1820 through 1846.

Passenger arrival lists known as customs manifests date back to 1820. However, the first official emigration station for New York was Castle Garden, located at the tip of lower Manhattan. Congressional action in 1891 resulted in federal immigration officials recording the immigrants’ arrival. After January 1892, passengers arriving in New York debarked at Ellis Island, located east of Manhattan in the New York Harbor. From 1892 to 1924, almost all immigrants entered the United States through the port of New York.

The passenger arrival list was used by legal inspectors at Ellis Island to cross-examine each immigrant during a legal inspection prior to the person being allowed to live in America. Only two percent of the prospective immigrants were denied entry.

The information was supplied by the immigrant or a traveling companion (usually a family member). Incorrect information was occasionally given, or mistakes may have been made when the clerk guessed at the spelling of foreign names.

Related Websites

Related Wiki Articles

Contributions to This Article

We welcome user additions to FamilySearch Historical Records wiki articles. Guidelines are available to help you make changes. Thank you for any contributions you may provide. If you would like to get more involved join the WikiProject FamilySearch Records.

Citations for This Collection

When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information; that is, cite your sources. This will help people find the record again and evaluate the reliability of the source. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records. Citations are available for the collection as a whole and each record or image individually.

Collection Citation:

"New York, New York, Index to Passenger Lists, 1820-1846." Index and Images. FamilySearch. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2013. Citing NARA microfilm publication M261. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.

Record Citation (or citation for the index entry):
{{Record Citation Link |CID=CID1919703 |title=New York, New York, Index to Passenger Lists, 1820-1846

Image citation:

The citation for an image is available on each image in this collection by clicking Show Citation at the bottom left of the image screen. You can browse through images in this collection by visiting the browse page for New York, New York, Index to Passenger Lists, 1820-1846.

 

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  • This page was last modified on 24 November 2014, at 22:49.
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