Salisbury St Thomas, WiltshireEdit This Page

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England  Gotoarrow.png  WiltshireGotoarrow.png  Wiltshire Parishes


Contents

Parish History

Salisbury (or New Sarum).SALISBURY, a city,having separate civil jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Underditch, S. division of Wilts, 82 miles(S. W. by W.) from LondonFrom: 'Salisbury - Salwarpe', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 5-11. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51253  Date accessed: 01 April 2013. Parish and mun. border, city, and co. town of Wiltshire, on the Upper Avon, at confluence of the Bourne and the Nadder and Wiley, 28 miles W. of Winchester and 83 SW. of London by rail.[1]The city comprises the parish of St. Edmund, containing 4461 inhabitants; part of St. Martin's, 3051;and theparish of St. Thomas, 2515; also theextraparochial district of the Cathedral Close, with 596 inhabitants. The living of St. Edmund's is a perpetualcuracy; net income, £176; patron, the Bishop. Thechurch was formerly collegiate, and is a fine structurein the later English style, with a tower which, havingfallen down in 1653, was rebuilt in an appropriate manner; the chancel has been modernised, and contains abeautiful painted window of the Ascension, by Eginton,the gift of the late Samuel Whitchurch, Esq. The livingof St. Martin's is a vicarage, valued in the king's booksat £11. 3. 1½.; net income, £188; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter. The church is a spacious building, combining different styles, with a towersurmounted by a spire. The living of St. Thomas' is aperpetual curacy; net income, £118; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter. The church is alarge handsome edifice in the later English style, with atower on the south side of the south aisle; the chanceland some other parts are specimens of considerablemerit, and among the monuments is one supposed to bethat of the Duke of Buckingham who was executedhere in the reign of Richard III. There are places ofworship for Independents, Baptists, Wesleyans, Unitarians, and Roman Catholics. The grammar From: 'Salisbury - Salwarpe', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 5-11. Date accessed: 01 April 2013.

Resources

Civil Registration

Birth, marriages and deaths were kept by the government, from July 1837 to the present day. The civil registration article tells more about these records. There are several Internet sites with name lists or indexes. A popular site is FreeBMD.

Church records

Contributor: Include here information for parish registers, Bishop’s Transcripts, non conformist and other types of church records, such as parish chest records. Add the contact information for the office holding the original records. Add links to the Family History Library Catalog showing the film numbers in their collection

Census records

Census records from 1841 to 1911 are available online. For access, see England Census Records and Indexes Online. Census records from 1841 to 1891 are also available on film through a Family History Center or at the Family History Library. The first film number is 464204.

Probate records

Records of wills, administrations, inventories, indexes, etc. were filed by the court with jurisdiction over this parish. Go to Wiltshire Probate Records to find the name of the court having primary jurisdiction. Scroll down in the article to the section Court Jurisdictions by Parish.

Maps and Gazetteers

Maps are a visual look at the locations in England. Gazetteers contain brief summaries about a place.

Web sites

References

  1. Bartholomew, John, Gazetteer of the British Isles, (1887)
 

 

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