Tennessee County, Tennessee

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'''Tennessee County''' was organized in 1788 on land in the modern state of [[Tennessee]], but which at the time was part of [[North Carolina]]. It was formed from part of the old [[Davidson County, Tennessee|Davidson County]].<ref name="TNCo">"Tennessee County" in ''Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia'' at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennessee_County (accessed 25 May 2010).</ref> In 1789 when North Carolina ratified the new Constitution and entered the union, North Carolina ceded its western area, now Tennessee, to the federal government.<ref>"History of Tennessee" in ''Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia'' at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Tennessee (accessed 25 May 2010).</ref>  
 
'''Tennessee County''' was organized in 1788 on land in the modern state of [[Tennessee]], but which at the time was part of [[North Carolina]]. It was formed from part of the old [[Davidson County, Tennessee|Davidson County]].<ref name="TNCo">"Tennessee County" in ''Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia'' at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennessee_County (accessed 25 May 2010).</ref> In 1789 when North Carolina ratified the new Constitution and entered the union, North Carolina ceded its western area, now Tennessee, to the federal government.<ref>"History of Tennessee" in ''Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia'' at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Tennessee (accessed 25 May 2010).</ref>  
  
In 1796 the modern state of Tennessee was admitted to the union. That was when Tennessee County gave up its name for use by the new state.<ref name="McBride">Robert M. McBride, "Lost Counties of Tennessee," ''[http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1137265 East Tennessee Historical Society's Publications]'' 38 (1966): 6. </ref>Tennessee County was then divided into [[Montgomery County, Tennessee|Montgomery]] and [[Robertson County, Tennessee|Robertson]] counties. The land of the extinct Tennessee County now forms the modern [[Humphreys County, Tennessee|Humphreys]], Montgomery, and Robertson counties and portions of [[Stewart County, Tennessee|Stewart]], [[Dickson County, Tennessee|Dickson]], [[Cheatham County, Tennessee|Cheatham]], and [[Houston County, Tennessee|Houston]] counties.<ref name="TNCo" />  
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In 1796 the modern state of Tennessee was admitted to the union. That was when Tennessee County gave up its name for use by the new state.<ref name="McBride">Robert M. McBride, "Lost Counties of Tennessee," ''[http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1137265 East Tennessee Historical Society's Publications]'' 38 (1966): 6.</ref> Tennessee County was then divided into [[Montgomery County, Tennessee|Montgomery]] and [[Robertson County, Tennessee|Robertson]] counties. The land of the extinct Tennessee County now forms the modern [[Humphreys County, Tennessee|Humphreys]], Montgomery, and Robertson counties and portions of [[Stewart County, Tennessee|Stewart]], [[Dickson County, Tennessee|Dickson]], [[Cheatham County, Tennessee|Cheatham]], and [[Houston County, Tennessee|Houston]] counties.<ref name="TNCo" />  
  
 
The records of extinct Tennessee County are now found in [[Robertson County, Tennessee]].<ref>Alice Eichholz, ''[http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/55947869 Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources, 3rd ed.]'' (Provo, Utah: Ancestry, 2004) [[{{RedBook}}]], 639.</ref>  
 
The records of extinct Tennessee County are now found in [[Robertson County, Tennessee]].<ref>Alice Eichholz, ''[http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/55947869 Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources, 3rd ed.]'' (Provo, Utah: Ancestry, 2004) [[{{RedBook}}]], 639.</ref>  

Revision as of 02:23, 8 July 2010

United States Gotoarrow.png Tennessee Gotoarrow.png Tennessee County

Tennessee County was organized in 1788 on land in the modern state of Tennessee, but which at the time was part of North Carolina. It was formed from part of the old Davidson County.[1] In 1789 when North Carolina ratified the new Constitution and entered the union, North Carolina ceded its western area, now Tennessee, to the federal government.[2]

In 1796 the modern state of Tennessee was admitted to the union. That was when Tennessee County gave up its name for use by the new state.[3] Tennessee County was then divided into Montgomery and Robertson counties. The land of the extinct Tennessee County now forms the modern Humphreys, Montgomery, and Robertson counties and portions of Stewart, Dickson, Cheatham, and Houston counties.[1]

The records of extinct Tennessee County are now found in Robertson County, Tennessee.[4]

Census 1770-1790

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject: Tennessee County

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Tennessee County" in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennessee_County (accessed 25 May 2010).
  2. "History of Tennessee" in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Tennessee (accessed 25 May 2010).
  3. Robert M. McBride, "Lost Counties of Tennessee," East Tennessee Historical Society's Publications 38 (1966): 6.
  4. Alice Eichholz, Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources, 3rd ed. (Provo, Utah: Ancestry, 2004) [FHL Book 973 D27rb 2004], 639.