User:National Institute sandbox 14G

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{{Infobox NIFGS|June 2012|{{Methodology, parts 1-6}}|Louise St Denis, Brenda Dougall Merriman and Dr. Penelope Christensen}} 
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{{Infobox NIFGS|June 2012|{{Methodology, parts 1-6}}|Louise St Denis, Brenda Dougall Merriman and Dr. Penelope Christensen}}
  
 
=== Relationships  ===
 
=== Relationships  ===
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'''Relationship Chart'''  
 
'''Relationship Chart'''  
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{| width="600" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="1" border="1"
 
|-
 
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| 6c 3r<br>
 
| 6c 3r<br>
 
|}
 
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<br>
 
  
 
==== Notes on using the Relationship Chart  ====
 
==== Notes on using the Relationship Chart  ====
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*You can extend this to your grandfather’s brother and his descendants, working to the right and downwards as before.<br>
 
*You can extend this to your grandfather’s brother and his descendants, working to the right and downwards as before.<br>
  
<br> '''2. Those of previous generations (above the Main Cousin Line)'''<br> This is a little harder as we are not so used to it.<br>  
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'''2. Those of previous generations (above the Main Cousin Line)'''<br> This is a little harder as we are not so used to it.<br>  
  
 
*The terms 3c 2r etc. are used slightly differently above the Main Cousin Line.  
 
*The terms 3c 2r etc. are used slightly differently above the Main Cousin Line.  
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| All<br>All<br>
 
| All<br>All<br>
 
|}
 
|}
 
<br>
 
  
 
==== Ancestral Places  ====
 
==== Ancestral Places  ====
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<br>  
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<br>A variation on the Ancestral Surnames chart is the ''Tiny Tafel'' (Tafel means table in German) which is shown in the chart below. This gives RIN (Record Identification Number) as well as Soundex code, which can be obtained from the [http://resources.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/soundexconverter RootsWeb’s Soundex Converter] is useful when using many indexes.  
 
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A variation on the Ancestral Surnames chart is the ''Tiny Tafel'' (Tafel means table in German) which is shown in the chart below. This gives RIN (Record Identification Number) as well as Soundex code, which can be obtained from the [http://resources.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/soundexconverter RootsWeb’s Soundex Converter] is useful when using many indexes.  
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+
<br>
+
  
 
==== Tiny Tafel  ====
 
==== Tiny Tafel  ====
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If you have an exact age in years, months and days at death you may apply the ''8870 Formula'' devised by the Hawkins County Genealogical and Historical Society, Rogersville, Tennessee. Such details may be found on tombstones and in burial registers, especially Scandinavian ones. Say the person died on 6 May 1889 aged 71 years, 7 months and 9 days. Use the following calculation:  
 
If you have an exact age in years, months and days at death you may apply the ''8870 Formula'' devised by the Hawkins County Genealogical and Historical Society, Rogersville, Tennessee. Such details may be found on tombstones and in burial registers, especially Scandinavian ones. Say the person died on 6 May 1889 aged 71 years, 7 months and 9 days. Use the following calculation:  
  
[[Image:Exact Birth Calculation Table-14G.jpg|left|Exact Birth Calculation Table-14G.jpg]]<br>
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[[Image:Exact Birth Calculation Table-14G.jpg|left|Exact Birth Calculation Table-14G.jpg]]
  
________________________________________<br>  
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<br> ________________________________________<br>  
  
 
<br>Information in this Wiki page is excerpted from the online courses {{Methodology, parts 1-6}} offered by [http://www.genealogicalstudies.com The National Institute for Genealogical Studies]. To learn more about these courses or other courses available from the Institute, see our website. We can be contacted at [mailto:wiki@genealogicalstudies.com wiki@genealogicalstudies.com] <br>  
 
<br>Information in this Wiki page is excerpted from the online courses {{Methodology, parts 1-6}} offered by [http://www.genealogicalstudies.com The National Institute for Genealogical Studies]. To learn more about these courses or other courses available from the Institute, see our website. We can be contacted at [mailto:wiki@genealogicalstudies.com wiki@genealogicalstudies.com] <br>  

Revision as of 20:15, 21 October 2013

 
National Institute for Genealogical StudiesNational Institute for Genealogical Studies.gif

The original content for this article was contributed by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies in June 2012. It is an excerpt from their course Methodology - Part 1: Getting Started, Methodology - Part 2: Organizing and Skillbuilding, Methodology - Part 3: More Strategies, Methodology - Part 4: Effective Searching and Recording, Methodology - Part 5: How To Prove It, and Methodology - Part 6: Professional Preparation and Practice  by Louise St Denis, Brenda Dougall Merriman and Dr. Penelope Christensen. The Institute offers over 200 comprehensive genealogy courses for a fee ($).

Contents

Relationships

Now that you are the family historian you will be expected to be able to tell members of your family the degree of relationship they have to another member, for example to the lady who just emailed you from Australia, or the ‘cousin-of-some-sort’ who has the family bible.

There is a simple way to calculate in your head the relationship between any two people who share a common ancestor. First decide what relation the common ancestor is to each of you. Then count the ‘G’s’ i.e., the number of greats and grand and that number is your cousinship. For example: If you share a 3rd Great Grandfather this makes 4 ‘Gs’ (great, great, great grand) and thus you are 4th cousins. If the number is different, say it is your 3rd GG and her 4th GG, then take the lower number for the cousinship and add ‘once removed’, since you are one generation ‘out-of-kilter.’ In this case you would be 4th cousins once removed. Simple ain’t it! This works for most situations that you are likely to run into with living people. For the more obscure situations there is a standard chart which is reproduced here.

Relationship Chart

4GG father
--------
--------
--------
--------
--------
--------
4GG uncle
3GG father
--------
--------
--------
--------
--------
3GG uncle
1c 5r
2GG father
--------
--------
--------
--------
2GG uncle
1c 4r
2c 4r
GG father
--------
--------
--------
GG uncle
1c 3r
2c 3r
3c 3r
G father
--------
-------
G uncle
1c 2r
2c 2r
3c 2r
4c 2r
Father
-------
Uncle
1c 1r
2c 1r
3c 1r
4c 1r
5c 1r
Yourself
Brother
1st cousin
2nd cousin
3rd cousin
4th cousin
5th cousin
6th cousin
Son
Nephew
1c 1r
2c 1r
3c 1r
4c 1r
5c 1r
6c 1r
G Son
G Nephew
1c 2r
2c 2r
3c 2r
4c 2r
5c 2r
6c 2r
GG Son
GG Nephew
1c 3r
2c 3r
3c 3r
4c 3r
5c 3r
6c 3r

Notes on using the Relationship Chart

  • The relationships all refer to Yourself on the chart.
  • Male gender has been used although both are implied.
  • Those joined by horizontal lines (----) are siblings.
  • Those in one vertical column are in a direct lineal descent (father-son- grandson etc.)
  • Those in same horizontal row are of the same generation.
  • 1c 2r = First cousin once removed etc. The term ‘removed’ just means ‘of a different generation’. ‘Once removed’ being one generation removed from yourself.
  • To your 2GG father you are his 2GG son, likewise to your 4GG uncle you are his 4GG Nephew.
  • 1st cousins share the same grandparents, 2nd cousins the same GG parents and so on.

Instructions

1. Those of your generation and their descendants

  • Your generation includes your brother, and all 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th etc. cousins who form the Main Cousin Line across the Chart.
  • Starting with Yourself your brother is to the right. His son is your nephew, his grandson your grand (or great) nephew etc.
  • Your father’s brother is your uncle. His son is your 1st cousin, his grandson your 1st cousin once removed, and his GG son is still your first cousin but twice removed because he is two generations different from yourself.
  • You can extend this to your grandfather’s brother and his descendants, working to the right and downwards as before.

2. Those of previous generations (above the Main Cousin Line)
This is a little harder as we are not so used to it.

  • The terms 3c 2r etc. are used slightly differently above the Main Cousin Line.
  • The easiest one is 1c 1r. Your father’s first cousin is of the same generation as him, and thus ‘once removed’ from you, but he is still a 1st cousin.
  • Following this progression vertically, (you will actually be moving NE on your chart), your grandfather’s 1st cousin is your 1c 2r, and your GG father’s 1st cousin is your 1c 3r. The amount of removal changes because they are of different generations.
  • Following it horizontally from 1c 1r (with whom you share descent from your GG father), your 2c1r shares descent from your 2GG father, and your 3c 1r from your 3GG father. The cousinship changes because they share less and less common heritage.

Lists of Ancestral Names and Places

Keeping an up-to-date list of your Ancestral Surnames and Ancestral Places in your briefcase is incredibly useful in focussing your endeavours and saving time when browsing book indexes or lists of films in at your FSC, or when contacting possible cousins. The list was typed once onto the computer and then sorted two ways and given appropriate headings, and it is thus quickly updated as research proceeds. When you join a FHS you will be asked to provide at least the first list of Ancestral Surnames for publication in their journal to assist in contacting other researchers.

Ancestral Surnames

ANCESTRAL SURNAMES
ONE-NAME STUDES: I collect all references, anywhere to:
BRICKETT, CHOWEN/CHOWINGS, DARTNALL/DURTNELL/DUTNAIL, DASHWOOD, JUPP
NAME PARISH COUNTY COUNTRY DATES
BATEY, Samuel

Greenwich, Chatham
Any

Kent
Canada
England
Canada
Post 1850
Post 1916
BAWCUTT All Kent England Post 1819
BISSET(T) SMiF Westminster, Whitechapel,
St. Geo. East
Middlesex England Pre-1858
BORCKHARDT Westminster Middlesex England Pre-1782
DODLER East London Middlesex England Post 1867
EVES

Greenwich, Deptford, Lewisham
Surbiton, Long/Thames Ditton

Kent
Surrey
England
England
Pre-1944
Pre-1885
GARD(E/I)NER Crayford
Stratford, West Ham
Wandsworth, Sydenham
Kent
Essex
Surrey
England
England
England
Post 1882
Pre-1865
Pre-1882
HAMMANT Crayford Kent England All
LOVE Westminster Westminster England Post 1863
MATTERFACE John and Johanna in London
and Australia
London
All
England
Australia
Post 1874
Post 1874
NELSON Lambeth
Strand, Bethnal Green
Surrey
Middlesex
England
England
Post 1800
Post 1800
REMNANT Chislehurst Kent England Pre-1780
THOM Rotherhithe
Cruden, Peterhead
Surrey
Aberdeenshire
England
Scotland
Post 1800
All
TOPPING London
London
Middlesex
Surrey
England
England
All
All

Ancestral Places

ANCESTRAL PLACES
ONE-NAME STUDIES: I collect all references, anywhere to:
BRICKETT, CHOWEN/CHOWINGS, DARTNALL/DURTNELL/DUTNAIL, DASHWOOD, JUPP
COUNTRY
COUNTY
PARISH
NAME
DATES
Australia
Any
Any
MATTERFACE (m. Dashwood)
Post 1874
England
Beds
Battlesden
BARBER
Pre-1606
England
Beds
Battlesden
JOHNS/JONES
Pre-1631
England
Beds
Billington
LAKE
Pre-1706
England
Beds
Chalgrave
FILPOT
Pre-1788
England
Beds
Chalgrave
PHILPOT
Pre-1788
England
Beds
Chalgrave
HILLIARD
Pre-1833
Scotland
Aberdeen
Cruden
JOHNSTON
1800-26
Scotland
Aberdeen
Cruden
THOM
All
Scotland
Aberdeen
Old Deer
PRESLAY/ PRESLEY
Pre-1780
Scotland
Aberdeen
Old Deer
THOM
Pre-1880
Scotland
Aberdeen
Old Machar
THOM
Pre-1880
Scotland
Aberdeen
Peterhead area?
MOSS
Pre-1812
Scotland
Aberdeen
Peterhead
THOM
All


A variation on the Ancestral Surnames chart is the Tiny Tafel (Tafel means table in German) which is shown in the chart below. This gives RIN (Record Identification Number) as well as Soundex code, which can be obtained from the RootsWeb’s Soundex Converter is useful when using many indexes.

Tiny Tafel

Soundex
code

Birth
Earliest
Ancestor
Death
Latest
Ancestor

Surname\Birthplace 1st ancestor/
Place of death last ancestor (RIN #)
A450
1799
1867
ALLEN\ Byfleet, Surrey/ Byfleet, Surrey (26)
B623
1565
1938
BRICKETT\ Dunstable, Beds/ Crayford, Kent (130)
B650
1727
1854
BROWN\ Chichester, Sussex/ Hunston, Sussex (520)
B650
1731
1904
BROWN\ Tonbridge, Kent/ Crayford, Kent (249)
 C520
1658
1916
CHOWINS\ Coryton, Devon/ Greenwich, Kent
C462
1799
1861
CLARK\ Dereham, Norfolk/ Marylebone, Middlesex (185)
D635
1733
1927
DARTNELL\ Hadlow, Kent/ Crayford, Kent (187)
D230
1572
1921
DASHWOOD\ Tarrant Monkton, Dorset/ Reigate, Surrey (6)
D100
1697
1851
DAVEY\ Cuckfield1572, Sussex/ Hurstpierpoint, Sussex (211)
J100
1647
1976
JUPP\ West Grinstead, Sussex/ Crayford, Kent (128)

Calculating An Exact Birth Date

If you have an exact age in years, months and days at death you may apply the 8870 Formula devised by the Hawkins County Genealogical and Historical Society, Rogersville, Tennessee. Such details may be found on tombstones and in burial registers, especially Scandinavian ones. Say the person died on 6 May 1889 aged 71 years, 7 months and 9 days. Use the following calculation:

Exact Birth Calculation Table-14G.jpg


________________________________________


Information in this Wiki page is excerpted from the online courses Methodology - Part 1: Getting Started, Methodology - Part 2: Organizing and Skillbuilding, Methodology - Part 3: More Strategies, Methodology - Part 4: Effective Searching and Recording, Methodology - Part 5: How To Prove It, and Methodology - Part 6: Professional Preparation and Practice offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. To learn more about these courses or other courses available from the Institute, see our website. We can be contacted at wiki@genealogicalstudies.com

We welcome updates and additions to this Wiki page.