Virginia Cohabitation Records

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== '''Virginia Cohabitation Records''' ==
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=== '''Virginia State Law''' ===
  
The Cohabitation Records, offically titled, "Register of Colored Persons, Augusta County, State of Virginia, Cohabiting Together as Husband and Wife," are a record of free African American families living in Virginia immediately after the end of the Civil War. The records were created by the Freedmen's Bureau in an effort to document the marriages of formerly enslaved men and women that were legally recognized by an act of the Virginia Assembly in February 1866.
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The Cohabitation Records, offically titled, "Register of Colored Persons, Augusta County, State of Virginia, Cohabiting Together as Husband and Wife," are a record of free African American families living in Virginia immediately after the end of the Civil War. The records were created by the Freedmen's Bureau in an effort to document the marriages of formerly enslaved men and women that were legally recognized by an act of the Virginia Assembly in February 1866. <ref name="Virginia State Law">White, Barnetta McGhee, Ph.D.,'''''Somebody Knows My Name: Marriages of Freed People in N.C. County by County.'''''(Athens, GA: Iberian Publishing Co.), 1995: xxxiv.</ref>
  
 
[http://valley.lib.virginia.edu/cohabitation Augusta County]<br>
 
[http://valley.lib.virginia.edu/cohabitation Augusta County]<br>
  
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== Sources ==
  
 
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{{reflist}}
  
 
[[Rural Records of Mid-Southern United States]]
 
[[Rural Records of Mid-Southern United States]]

Revision as of 16:05, 27 January 2010

Virginia State Law

The Cohabitation Records, offically titled, "Register of Colored Persons, Augusta County, State of Virginia, Cohabiting Together as Husband and Wife," are a record of free African American families living in Virginia immediately after the end of the Civil War. The records were created by the Freedmen's Bureau in an effort to document the marriages of formerly enslaved men and women that were legally recognized by an act of the Virginia Assembly in February 1866. [1]

Augusta County




Sources

  1. White, Barnetta McGhee, Ph.D.,Somebody Knows My Name: Marriages of Freed People in N.C. County by County.(Athens, GA: Iberian Publishing Co.), 1995: xxxiv.

Rural Records of Mid-Southern United States