25th Regiment, Arkansas Infantry (Confederate)Edit This Page

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Brief History

25th Infantry Regiment [also called 30th Regiment] completed its organization at Little Rock, Arkansas, during the late summer of 1861 using the 11th Arkansas Battalion as its nucleus. From April to August, 1863, the 25th was consolidated with the 31st Arkansas Regiment. On April 26, 1865, it surrendered. [1]

The 25th Arkansas Infantry was organized in August, 1861 as the 30th Arkansas by the election of Colonel Charles J. Turnbull, of Little Rock, Lt.Col. Henry Remington (who resigned and was replaced by Lt. Col. Eli Hufstedler), and Major James J. Franklin. They were consolidated with other decimated regiments 9Apr1865 at Smithfield, NC and became the 1st Mounted Rifle Regiment Consolidated. [2]

© 2001 by EDWARD G. GERDES all rights reserved. This information may be used by libraries and genealogical societies, however, commercial use of this information is strictly prohibited without prior permission. If copied, this copyright notice must appear with the information.

The Peyton Rifles. This volunteer company was organized at Little Rock, Arkansas, in early 1861, composed mostly of men from Pulaski County. In April 1861, the Peyton Rifles was one of four Little Rock volunteer companies selected to form Colonel Solon Borland’s composite militia battalion. Solon’s battalion traveled up the Arkansas River to Fort Smith, where it forced the surrender of the United States Army post in a bloodless show of force. The “Fort Smith Expedition” lasted from April 20 to 30, 1861. Upon its return to Little Rock, the Peyton Rifles seems to have disbanded. Its members subsequently enlisted in regular Confederate units. In March 1862, the Peyton Rifles apparently reorganized. A company led by Capt. James J. Franklin, calling itself the Peyton Rifles, and containing a handful of the original members of the company, enlisted in Confederate service at Little Rock. Initially assigned as (old) Company B, 8th Battalion Arkansas Infantry, it was transferred to the 25th Regiment Arkansas Infantry as Company F in May 1862.[3]

2001-copyright-The above information may be used for non-commercial historical and genealogical purposes only and with the consent of the page owner may be copied for the same purposes so long as this notice remains a part of the copied material.

Companies in this Regiment with the Counties of Origin

Men often enlisted in a company recruited in the counties where they lived though not always. After many battles, companies might be combined because so many men were killed or wounded. However if you are unsure which company your ancestor was in, try the company recruited in his county first.

  • Men from Greene County served in this regiment.


The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors database lists 1,326 men on its roster for this unit. Roster.

Other Sources

  • Beginning United States Civil War Research gives steps for finding information about a Civil War soldier or sailor. It covers the major records that should be used. Additional records are described in 'Arkansas in the Civil War' and 'United States Civil War, 1861 to 1865' (see below).
  • National Park Service, The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System, is searchable by soldier's name and state. It contains basic facts about soldiers on both sides of the Civil War, a list of regiments, descriptions of significant battles, sources of the information, and suggestions for where to find additional information.
  • Arkansas in the Civil War describes many Confederate and Union sources, specifically for Tennessee, and how to find them.. These include compiled service records, pension records, rosters, cemetery records, Internet databases, published books, etc.
  • United States Civil War, 1861 to 1865 describes and explains United States and Confederate States records, rather than state records, and how to find them. These include veterans’ censuses, compiled service records, pension records, rosters, cemetery records, Internet databases, published books, etc.

References

  1. National Park Service, The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System (accessed 4 January 2011).
  2. EDWARD G. GERDES, Arkansas Civil War Regiments, Rosters and Muster Rolls, http://www.couchgenweb.com/civilwar/25thfs&o.htm, 11/8/2010.
  3. EDWARD G. GERDES, Arkansas Civil War Regiments, Rosters and Muster Rolls, http://www.couchgenweb.com/civilwar/25thfs&o.htm, 11/8/2010.

 

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  • This page was last modified on 5 February 2015, at 20:36.
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