Ayr Nonconformist Church RecordsEdit This Page

From FamilySearch Wiki

Here is a list of the known pre-1855 nonconformist churches and their records for the parish of Ayr.

Contents

First United Presbyterian, Original Secession Church of Ayr 

History—
The first secession congregation in Ayr had a common origin with that of Auchinleck. The first supply of sermon was afforded to the seceders in Ayr in 1755, at which time it was difficult for them to obtain a piece of ground on which to erect a tent, and it was not until 15 years afterwards that they were disjoined from Kilmaurs, 14 miles off, and formed into a separate congregation. The first church built in 1770, the second was built in 1799.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details may be given in the source, including a list of ministers.

Records—
There are no known pre–1855 records.


Darlington Place United Presbyterian Church

History—
This congregation, formerly known as Wallacetown, originated with members of the secession congregation of Tarbolton, resident in and about Ayr, who, on account of distance from their accustomed place of worship, petitioned the Associate Burgher Presbytery of Kilmarnock to be disjoined and formed into a separate congregation, which was granted in 1797. A church was built in 1799. A new church was opened in 1860.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details may be given in the source, including a list of ministers.

Records—                                    FHL Microfilm Number
Baptismal Register 1850–1865        0889482 item 2      X
Note: The X means the records have been extracted.


Other:
Session Minutes 1824–1933
Managers Minutes 1798–1815
Account Book 1799–1848
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/435.


Cathcart Street Relief, later United Presbyterian Church

History—
Many who lived in Ayr and St. Quivox parishes used to attend the ministry of Dr. Peebles of Newton, who was evangelical and decidedly popular. However, when they wanted baptism for their children, they had to seek permission from the minister of Ayr, a moderate, to allow Dr. Peebles to dispense this ordinance for them. The parish of Ochiltree, 12 miles east of Ayr, had the ministrations of Rev. Mr. Thomson, a Relief Church minister. Many earnest people used to go there on sacramental occasions. Feeling the hardships that pressed them, it is said that they consulted Mr. Thomson as to the course they should follow, and his advice was to apply to the Relief Presbytery of Glasgow for a dispensation of ordinances. This counsel, so agreeable to their own inclinations, was speedily followed. A meeting of all friendly to the movement was held on the 26th of October 1814, and a petition drawn up accordingly.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
Minutes 1817–1929
Manager’s Minutes 1830–1929
Baptisms 1832–1935
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH3/753.


Martyrs Free Presbyterian Church

History—
This congregation, originally Reformed Presbyterian, joined the Free Church in 1876. They had been formed as a Reformed congregation in 1830, having been separated off from the Kilmarnock congregation. Their church, at the junction of George Street and John Street, Wallacetown, was built in 1832. Before the 1876 union the fortunes of the congregation were very low. In 1850 the membership stood at only ninty and by the union it had fallen to forty. About 1880 new industries were opened in the town, bringing the opportunity, which was eagerly embraced, of work as a mission church. From that time the membership gradually improved. In 1900 the number on the Roll was one hundred ninety.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1943–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown.


Wallacetown Free Church

History—
William Grant, minister of Wallacetown quoad sacra church, and the bulk of his congregation, "came out" in 1843. At first they were called the Ayr and Wallacetown congregation. About two months after the Disruption they were deprived of their church and for a time they worshiped in a timber yard in the morning and in the Reformed Presbyterian Church in the afternoon and evening. In1844, Mr. Grant and his congregation were transferred to Ayr. Services were held here under the Newton congregation, until in 1854 the charge was sanctioned. They worshiped in the "Wooden Kirk" until 1860, when their new church on John Street was opened. A house for a manse was purchased near the church.
Membership:  In 1859 it was 233 and in 1900 it was 302.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland,1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown.



West Free Church

History—
Neither of the ministers of Ayr "came out" in 1843. Charge of this parish and that of St. Quivex was entrusted to William Grant, minister of Wallacetown, and James Stevenson, minister of Newton. On being deprived of the church at Wallacetown, Mr. Grant and his congregation were transferred to Ayr. A wooden building was erected and opened in October 1843. Here the congregation worshiped till November 1845, when the new church was opened. Subsequently a house was purchased for a manse. A hall for mission purposes was built in 1880. Removal of the population from the centre of the town to the outskirts, accounts for decline in membership.
Membership: 1848, 600; 1900, 459.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. This source includes a list of ministers.

Records—
The extent of pre–1855 records is unknown.


Ayr Congregational Churches

History—
A church was formed in Ayr in 1804, by converts of Richard Penman who apparently became the first minister in that year. The church seems to have been a struggling one from the first, and had a chequered history until its dissolution in 1878. The Wallace Street church was formed in 1844. It was admitted to the Evangelical Union in the following year. The Wallace Street building was opened in 1865. A split in the membership in 1897 resulted in the formation of Morison Church. In 1898 the minister and many of the members of the Wallace Street church joined the United Presbyterian Church. The minority began to meet again in 1900 and was admitted into the Congregational Union as Wallace Street Church in 1905. In 1901 the Morison Church obtained the Original Secession Church building on George Street where it still meets.
Source: A History of Scottish Congregationalism, by Harry Escott, pub. 1960. FHL British book 941 K2es.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown. For more information write to:
The United Reformed Church, Scottish Synod Office
PO Box 189
240 Cathedral Street
Glasgow G1 2BX
Scotland



Ayr Roman Catholic Church

History—
According to an 1834 report from the priest in Ayr, there were 5000–6000 Catholics in the county and 200 Catholic families within the city of Ayr. The church of St. Margaret opened in 1822. No further history is available.

Records—
Baptisms 1822–1857
Marriages 1822–1857
Note: Available online for a fee, at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk, Edinburgh, record RH21/51.


For later records write to the parish priest at:

St. Margaret’s
27 John Street
Ayr KA8 0BS, Scotland


Ayr Moravian Church

History—
Moravian preaching in Scotland really began with James Caldwell’s mission to Ayr in 1765. A small society of 42 members was formed. Caldwell left in 1767 and four years later members of the society applied for congregational status. Services continued in Ayr until 1916. A school for girls was founded in 1816.
Source:  Sources for Scottish Genealogy and Family History, by Don J. Steel, pub. 1970. FHL British Ref. book 942 V26ste vol. 12.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown.


Ayr Episcopalian Church

History—
A congregation was established in 1832, but there was an earlier congregation for which no history is available. In the early 1790s there were little more than 50 members.

Records—
Baptisms 1776–1780, 1787–1800, 1826–1839
Marriages 1777–1779, 1788–138
Note: Available at National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH12/26.


Ayr Wesleyan Methodist Church

A Wesleyan Methodist Church is known to have existed in Ayr, but its history and The extent of records is unknown.

For information write to:
The Reverend Rector
12 Barns Terrace
Ayr KA7 2DB, Scotland.

You may also write to:
The Methodist Church Archives
c/o The John Rylands University Library of Manchester
150 Deansgate
Manchester M3 3EH
England

 

[Return to main Ayr page.]


 

Need additional research help? Contact our research help specialists.

Need wiki, indexing, or website help? Contact our product teams.


Did you find this article helpful?

You're invited to explain your rating on the discussion page (you must be signed in).

  • This page was last modified on 19 October 2009, at 19:33.
  • This page has been accessed 1,108 times.