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United States Gotoarrow.png American Indians Gotoarrow.png California Gotoarrow.png Indians of California Gotoarrow.png Chumash Indians

Guide to Chumash Indians ancestry, family history and genealogy: birth records, marriage records, death records, census records, and other agency records.

Chumash, Rafael Solares, a Samala Chief. Captain of soxtonoxmu Capital Village in the Santa Ynez Valley, by Leon De Cessac 19th Century..jpg
Culture area:California Linguistic Family: Hokan


Tribal Headquarters

Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians

Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 517
Santa Ynez, CA 93460

Physical Address:
100 Via Juana Lane
Santa Ynez, CA 93460

Phone: 1.805.688.7997
Fax: 1.805.686.9578




The Chumas historically occupied three northern islands of the Santa Barbara, the coast of Malibu Canyon to Estero Bay, and continued inland.

The Chumash Indians are also known as the Santa Barbara Indians. Original homeland was in Santa Barbara, California area.

Only the Chumash living on the Santa Ynez Reservation are recognized by the federal government. Some regional councils are recognized by the California Native American Heritage Commission.

Brief Timeline

1772: Catholic priest built a mission in the Santa Barbara area

1834: Released from servitude to Spain

Additional References to the History of the Tribe and/or Bands

Frederick Webb Hodge, in his Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico, gave a more complete history of the Chumash tribe, with estimations of the population of the tribe at various time periods. Additional details are given in John Swanton's The Indian Tribes of North America.


The Santa Ynez Reservation is located in Santa Barbara County, California. The reservation was established on December 27, 1901 authorized by the act of January 12, 1891.

Bands of the Chumash Tribe and Their Reservations

Subdivisions: (Swanton)

Barbareno Chumas, Cyuama Chumash, Emigdiano Chumash, Obispeno Chumash, Purisimeno Chumas, Santa Ynez Chumash, and Ventureno


The majority of records of individuals were those created by the agencies. Some records may be available to tribal members through the tribal headquarters.They were (and are) the local office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and were charged with maintaining records of the activities of those under their responsibility. Among these records are:

Web Sites

For Further Reading

  • Kroeber, Alfred L. Handbook of the Indians of California. Washington D.C.:Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 78, 1925. Reprint. New York City: Dover Publications, [ca 2006] WorldCat 255854981 Available online.

For background information to help find American Indian ancestors see For Further Reading.



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  • This page was last modified on 5 August 2015, at 15:11.
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