New Monkland with Airdrie, Lanarkshire, Scotland GenealogyEdit This Page

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New Monkland with Airdrie (#651)


This is a guide to the history and major genealogical records of Scotland as they pertain to the parish of New Monkland. To learn more about how to use these records to search for your ancestors, go to the Scotland: Research Strategies.

 

Contents

History  

MONKLAND, NEW or EAST, a parish, in the Middle ward of the county of Lanark, 11 miles (E. by N.) from Glasgow containing the market-town of Airdrie, the late quoad sacra parish of Clarkston, and the villages of Arden, Ballochney, Greengairs, Riggend, and Wattstown. The church, situated on an eminence in the western district of the parish, was built in 1777, and substantially repaired in 1817, and is a neat plain structure containing 1200 sittings. Several additional churches have been erected in the burgh of Airdrie and at Clarkston; and to all of them quoad sacra districts were till lately annexed by act of the General Assembly. The members of the Free Church have places of worship; and there are some for members of the United Secession, a Relief congregation, Cameronians, Independents, Baptists, and Wesleyans, and a Roman Catholic chapel.[1]

The New Statistical Account of Scotland (pub. 1834-45) offers uniquely rich and detailed parish reports for the whole of Scotland, covering a vast range of topics including history, agriculture, education, trades, religion and social customs. The reports, written by the parish ministers, are available online at http://edina.ac.uk/stat-acc-scot/ . Click on ‘Browse scanned pages’ then search the parish reports for New Monkland with Airdrie.  Also available at the Family History Library.

Census Records

A census is a count and description of the population, taken by the government, arranged by locality and by household. Read more about Scotland Census Records.

Click here for a list of the Family History Library microfilm numbers for the census records of New Monkland.

Below is information for any known surname indexes:

 

Years Surname Index             
1841
1851 CD-ROM no. 1850
1861 6205867
1871
1881 6086616 ( 41 fiche)
1891

The 1901 census of Scotland is indexed on www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk.  To use it, you must register and pay a small access fee. All available censuses, 1841-1901, are indexed on this website. It may be easier for you to pay to use the website rather than access indexes through the library.

 

Church Records

The Established Church of Scotland was Presbyterian. Read more about Scotland Church Records.

Here are the pre-1855 records that exist for this parish.

Established Church—Kirk Session Records

Years Covered FHL Film Number
Births: 1693-1819 1066599 items 3-4
1819-1842 1066600
1842-1855 1066601
1820-1854 - index 1066601
1838-1851 - neglected entries 1066601
Marriages: 1703-1752 1066599 items 3-4
1732-1820 - financial accounts 1066600
1820-1854 - financial accounts 1066601
Deaths: 1732-1820 - financial accounts 1066600
1820-1854 - financial accounts 1066601


Condition of Original Registers—

Indexed: For an index to these records, see the Scottish Church Records Index on computer at the Family History Library and family history centeres.  Some records may be indexed in the International Genealogical Index. 
Births: Six irregular entries for 1728–1747 are found after January 28, 1694. There are no entries May 1708–June 1709. After August 3, 1802 there are three pages containing irregular entries for 1799–1800. The record is tabulated for 1745–1803.
Marriages: There are no entries December 1703–September 1708, November 1717–July 1719, except for one 1742, March 1737–November 1743. The record after August 1752 is one of proclamations, with occasional entries relating to irregular marriages, intermixed with other matters.
Deaths: Mortcloth Dues.
Source:Key to the Parochial Registers of Scotland, by V. Ben Bloxham, pub. 1970. British Book 941 K23b.



Established Church—Kirk Session Records

The Kirk session was the court of the parish. The session was made up of the minister and the land owners and business men of the parish, chosen to serve on the session. The Kirk session dealt with moral issues, minor criminal cases, matters of the poor and education, matters of discipline, and the general concerns of the parish. Kirk session records may also mention births, marriages, and deaths.

Here is a list of the surviving Kirk session records for this parish:

Minutes 1692–1726, 1737, 1744–1963
Poors’ Accounts 1692–1733
Accounts 1799–1861
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH2/685.


Nonconformist Church Records

A nonconformist church is any church that is not the Established church. Read more about nonconformity in Scotland in the article on the Scotland Church Records Union Lists.


Well Wynd United Presbyterian Church

History—
In 1733, several parishioners who were dissatisfied with the new parish minister and the way, in which he was forced upon them, withdrew from the Established Church and cast in their lot with the seceders. Supply of sermon was irregular so these seceders connected themselves with the congregations at Cumbernauld and Cambusnethan. As the coal and iron works grew in Airdrie, so did the number of seceders in the area. Eventually a congregation was formed in Airdrie in connection with the Associate Burgher Synod, and a place of worship was erected in 1792. Another was built in 1847.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. FHL Film #477618. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
Various Minutes 1814–1937
Baptismal Register 1824–1860, 1863–1869
Communion Roll 1841 (and earlier) to 1897
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH2/992.


South Bridge Street, formerly Relief United Presbyterian Church

History—
The minister of the congregation in Newarthill wished to remove his place of worship to Airdrie where a considerable number of the people connected with it resided. At his own expense he erected a church and a manse in 1833. The congregation paid him rent. The members living in Airdrie attended church here while those in Newarthill remained there. When the minister resigned and went to America in 1841, this congregation withdrew from the United Associate Synod and connected themselves with the Relief Synod. They acceded to the United Presbyterian Church at the Union in 1847. A new church was built in 1846.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. FHL Film #477618. More details are given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
There are no pre–1855 records.


Broomknoll Free Church

History—
This congregation, formerly Burgher, Associate Synod, joined the Church of Scotland in 1839 and adhered to the Free Church in 1843. The church was built in 1806 and the manse in 1826. The deed conveying the property to the Established Church was on the point of completion when the Disruption took place. The transaction was not concluded and the congregation retained the buildings. A new manse was erected in 1875 and a new church in 1889.
Membership: 1848, 300; 1900, 508.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. FHL Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown.


Graham Street, formerly Reformed Free Church

History—
The Reformed Presbyterian corresponding societies in and around Airdrie were formed into a congregation in 1807. However, a minister was not settled until 1824, many having declined the call. A church was built in 1833. This congregation and its minister joined the minority Synod at the church–wide division in 1863. A new church was built in 1867. In 1870 some members left to form a congregation at Coatbridge, which the Airdrie congregation fostered. When in 1873 the minister resigned to join the Church of Scotland, at least 250 members of the congregation followed him to set up the “quoad sacra” parish church of Flowerhill. The Airdrie congregation remained without a minister until it joined the Free Church in 1876.
Membership: 1847, 180; 1868, 240; 1877, 78; 1900, 182.
Sources: The Reformed Presbyterian Church in Scotland, by W.J. Couper, pub. 1925; FHL Book 941 K2c; and Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, pub. 1914. FHL Film #918572. More details may be given in the sources including a list of ministers.

Records—
There are no pre–1855 records.


High Free Church

History—
The congregation of the parish church adhered to the Free Church in 1843. No steps were taken to deprive the congregation of the use of the church on which there was a considerable debt. It was built in 1838. In 1853 the Established Presbytery surrendered their right of property in the building, a stated fund being paid to them.
Membership: 1848, 400; 1900, 441.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. FHL Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
Various Minutes 1843–1917
Note: Available at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, record CH2/895.


West Free Church

History—
The minister of the West parish “came out” in 1843 with many of his congregation. A church was built in 1844 and a vestry added in 1845. A schoolhouse was erected in 1848 afterwards it was used as a hall and church officer’s house. Airdrie was a great center of the coal trade. Later engineering and iron works, a cotton mill and tube works employed a large population.
Membership: 1848, 300; 1900, 374.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. FHL Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown.


Airdrie Congregational Churches

History—
A small missionary church was formed in Airdrie in 1807. Robert Haldane built a mansion nearby and he had adopted Baptist views. From 1809 the church appears to have had Baptist sentiments. (For continuation, see the Baptist Churches below.) In 1836 a few men and women, both Secessionists and Baptists, formed a church in accordance with Congregational principles, which was designated as Ebenezer Church. They built a church in 1839 on Broomknoll Street, which was rebuilt in 1882. In 1842 the minister resigned and with a large part of the congregation formed the Baptist Church in Airdrie. In 1845 another contingent of members left and formed the Evangelical Union Church on Graham Street (see Park Church). But with a new minister Ebenezer Church continued to grow. This church left the Congregational Union in 1993. The Park Church joined the Evangelical Union in 1846. A church was built in 1851. A new church was built in Park Place, Kirkness Street, in 1906. This Congregation still exists.
Source: A History of Scottish Congregationalism by Harry Escott, pub. 1960. FHL Book 941 K2es. This book includes a list of ministers.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown. For information, write to:
The United Reformed Church, Scottish Synod Office
PO Box 189
240 Cathedral Street
Glasgow G1 2BX
Scotland


Airdrie Baptist Churches

History—
The first Independent church in Airdrie became Baptist about 1809. Services were held in Baillie’s Lane. This cause seems to have dwindled with time, though the first Sunday school in the district was opened in Baillie’s Lane in 1840.
A new Baptist church was formed in 1842 when the minister of the Ebenezer Congregational Church resigned and with a large part of his congregation formed the Baptist Church in Airdrie.
These were joined by the remnant of the previous church. A church was built at New Town Cross in 1843. The congregation struggled, with frequent changes of ministers, until a full–time pastor was appointed in 1869. Membership at that time stood at 61, and the church began to grow. A new building was erected on Graham Street in 1890. This congregation fostered a church at Coatbridge, which began about 1870.
Source: History of the Baptists in Scotland, by Rev. George Yuille, pub. 1926. FHL Book 941 K2hi. This book includes a list of ministers.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown. For information write to:
The Baptist Union of Scotland
12 Aytoun Road
Glasgow G41 5RT, Scotland


Airdrie Roman Catholic Church

History—
The area was served from Glasgow from 1831. A church was dedicated to St. Margaret in 1839. Another church was founded at Chapelhall in 1859 and has separate records from that date.
Source: Catholic Missions and Registers, 1700–1880: Vol. 6 Scotland, by Michael Gandy, pub. 1993. FHL Ref. Book 942 K24gm Vol. 6.

Records—
Baptisms 1839–1867 - originals continue
Marriages 1842–1857 - originals continue
Note: Available online for a fee, at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk, record RH21/1.


Airdrie Branch, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter–Day Saints

Records— 
                                                    FHL Film Number
Record of Members   1842–1947      0104149 item 2

Civil Registration Records


Government or civil registration of births, marriages, and deaths (also called statutory records) began on January 1, 1855 in Scotland. Each parish has a registrar's office and large cities have several. The records are created by the registrars and copies are sent to the General Register Office in Edinburgh. Annual indexes are then created for the records for the whole country.

See the article on Scotland Civil Registration for more information and to access the records.


Directories

Courtesy of the National Library of Scotland:

Probate Records

New Monkland was under the probate jurisdiction of the Commissary Court of Hamilton and Campsie  until 1823, and since then has been under the Sheriff's Court of Glasgow. Probate records for 1513- 1901 are indexed online at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk.  You must register on the website but use of the index to probate records, called 'Wills & Testaments,' is free. You may then purchase a copy of the document or, if the document is before 1823, it will be on microfilm at the Family History Library. To find the microfilm numbers, search in the library catalog  for the 'Place-names' of Lanark and the subject of 'Probate records.' Then click on the link to the records of the Commissariat of Hamilton and Campsie.
The library also has some post-1823 probate records for Lanark.  Look in the library catalog for the 'Place-names' of Lanark and the subjects of 'Probate Records' and 'Probate Records - Indexes.'


Read more about Scotland Probate Records.

References

  1. Lewis, Samuel A., A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (1846), pp. 255-272. Adapted. Date accessed: 28 February 2014.

Return to theLanarkshire parish list.


 

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  • This page was last modified on 4 February 2015, at 18:46.
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