Pocatello Stake, Idaho LDS Church Wards and BranchesEdit This Page

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Idaho Church Records go to Power County Church Records and Bannock County Church Recordsgo to Pocatello Stake, Idaho LDS Church Wards and Branches

This page includes the boundaries of wards and branches as of about 1930, a timeline history, and how to obtain the records.

Source used for this page: Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p.667.

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Contents

Pocatello Stake, 1930

Stake boundaries as of about 1930
See Encyclopedic History..., p. 667.[1]

  • Area of the County: Bannock and Power Counties, Idaho.
  • Boundaries of stake:

Pocatello Stake of Zion consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in Bannock and Power counties, Idaho



History Timeline up to about 1930

  • Aug. 7, 1898, the saints who resided in and near Pocatello and in Marsh Valley were organized as the Pocatello Stake of Zion. At the time of its organization the stake comprised nine wards, of which seven, namely, Pocatello, McCammon, Garden Creek, Marsh Center, Woodland, Dempsey and Cambridge, were taken from the Oneida Stake, and two, namely, Rockland and Neeleyville, from the Malad Stake.
  • Aug. 14, 1915, the Pocatello Stake was divided and the south part of the same organized as a new stake, named Portneuf Stake, to consist of the following wards, which had hitherto belonged to the Pocatello Stake: McCammon, Garden Creek, Marsh Center, Woodland, Dempsey, Cambridge and Grant. This left the following wards in the Pocatello Stake: American Falls, Crystal (Branch), Inkom, Meadow, Neeley, Pocatello 1st, Pocatello 2nd, Rockland and Tyhee.

This timeline (arranged by year) includes events that affected records, record-keeping, and movements of Mormons in this area.



Other History Resources
Many wards or branches appointed members to compile a history. Copies may be in the ward library or in homes of members. Some contain biographical sketches of members of the ward at the time of compilation.

Obtain the Records

Wards and Branches

American Falls, Crystal, Inkom, Meadow, North Pocatello, Pocatello 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th and Rockland.


American Falls Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 19.[2]

Boundaries:


American Falls Ward, Pocatello Stake, Power County, Idaho, consists of Latter-day Saints residing in and near the city of American Falls, which is an important station on the Oregon Short Line Railroad, 20 miles southwest of Pocatello, and 195 miles northwest of Salt Lake City, Utah.

History timeline

  • 1907 - Organized into a bishop’s ward Dec. 22.



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Crystal Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 165.[3]

Boundaries:

Crystal Ward, Pocatello Stake, Power Co., Idaho, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in that part of the county which irrigates from a number of small creeks rising in springs near the base of that range of mountains which separate Portneuf Valley from Bannock and Crystal valleys on the west.

History timeline


Obtain the records

Inkom Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 363.[4]

Boundaries:

Inkom Ward, Pocatello Stake, Bannock Co., Idaho, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in a scattered condition in Portneuf Canyon, or along the Portneuf River, between Pocatello and McCammon.

History timeline

  • 1904 - Organized as a branch of the Church named Inkom April 17.


Obtain the records

Meadow Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 485.[5]

Boundaries:

Meadow Ward, Pocatello Stake, Power Co., Idaho, consisted of Latter day Saints residing in a part of Bannock Valley.

History timeline

  • 1911 - On June 11, the north part of the Arbon Ward was organized by the Malad Stake presidency into a separate ward named Meadow.
  • 1913 - On June 14, the ward was transferred from the Malad to the Pocatello Stake.
  • 1929 - In 1929, the Meadow Ward was disorganized and the remaining saints in it transferred to the Arbon Ward of the Curlew Stake.


Obtain the records nsign Stake


North Pocatello Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 590.[6]

Boundaries:

North Pocatello Ward, Pocatello Stake, Bannock Co., Idaho, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in a farming district lying north of Pocatello.

History timeline

  • 1914 - At a special meeting held at Tyhee April 19, the ward was named Tyhee, an Indian name which signifies chief, but afterwards changed to North Pocatello Ward.


Obtain the records

Pocatello Wards

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 668-669.[7]

Boundaries:

  • Pocatello 1st Ward

Pocatello 1st Ward, Pocatello Stake, Bannock Co., Idaho, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in that part of Pocatello which is bounded on the north by Hayden St., (which separates it from the Pocatello 3rd Ward), east by the O. S. L. Railroad tracks, south by the limits of the city, and west by the mountains.

  • Pocatello 2nd Ward

Pocatello 2nd Ward, Pocatello Stake, Bannock Co., Ida., consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in that part of the city of Pocatello which is bounded on the north by Fremont St., on the east by the foothills of the mountains, on the south by Benton St., and on the west by 1st Avenue.

  • Pocatello 3rd Ward

Pocatello 3rd Ward, Pocatello Stake, Bannock Co., Idaho, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in that part of the city of Pocatello which is bounded on the north by the city corporation limits, on the east by the Oregon Short Line Railroad tracks, on the south by Hayden St., and on the west by the mountains.

  • Pocatello 4th Ward

Pocatello 4th Ward, Pocatello Stake, Bannock Co., Idaho, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in that part of the city of Pocatello which extends north to the North Pocatello Ward, east to the foothills of the mountains, south to Fremont St., and west to 1st Avenue.

  • Pocatello 5th Ward

Pocatello 5th Ward, Pocatello Stake, Bannock Co., Idaho, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in that part of the country known as Alameda. Northward the ward extends to the Chubbuck road, or to North Pocatello, east to Washington Avenue, south to the limits of the city of Pocatello, and west to the mountains.

  • Pocatello 6th Ward

Pocatello 6th Ward, Pocatello Stake, Bannock Co., Idaho, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in that part of the city of Pocatello which is bounded on the north by Benton St., on the east by the foothills of the mountains, on the south by the north boundary of the Inkom Ward, and the west by 1st Avenue.

History timeline

  • 1908 - Until Dec. 13, all the Latter-day Saints in Pocatello consisted of only one ward, but on the day mentioned the Pocatello Ward was divided into two wards, named respectively the Pocatello 1st Ward and the Pocatello 2nd Ward.
  • 1915 - At a special meeting held in the Pocatello 1st Ward Dec. 5, the Pocatello 1st Ward was divided, and the north part of the same organized as the Pocatello 3rd Ward.
  • 1921 - At a special meeting held in Pocatello Feb. 27, the Pocatello 2nd Ward was divided, and the north part of the same organized as the Pocatello 4th Ward.
  • 1921 - At a meeting held Feb. 27, the Pocatello 3rd Ward was divided and all that part of the same lying north of the city limits and west of Washington Avenue was organized as the Pocatello 5th Ward.
  • 1921 - At a special meeting held at Pocatello Feb. 27, the Pocatello 2nd Ward was divided and two new wards created from parts of the same, named respectively the Pocatello 4th and the Pocatello 6th wards, only a part of the Pocatello 2nd Ward being retained under that name.


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Rockland Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 716 .[8]

Boundaries:

Rockland Ward, Pocatello Stake, Power Co., Idaho, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in the town of Rockland and vicinity.

History timeline:

  • 1884 - On Sept 3, the saints on Rock Creek into a ward. In 1885 a post office was established in the Rock Creek Valley under the name of Rockland. Prior to this the settlement had been known as Rock Creek.


Obtain the records


References

  1. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 166-167.
  2. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 19.
  3. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 165.
  4. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 363.
  5. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 485.
  6. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 590.
  7. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 668-669.
  8. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 716 .

 

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  • This page was last modified on 14 April 2013, at 14:47.
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