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Stirling Pre-1855 Nonconformist Churches and Their Records

Stirling Associate Session Church Burgher-Erskine Church

History—
The congregation originated in 1733 when the minister, Rev. Ebenezer Erskine, one of the four founders of the Secession Church, seceded from the Established church, followed by eleven elders and many parishioners. Other seceders from neighboring parishes joined them. They continued to meet in the parish church until they were forcefully ejected in 1740. They built themselves a church shortly after, and a new church was built in 1826. At the Breach in 1747, Rev. Erskine and the majority of the congregation adhered to the Associate Burgher Synod. The congregation became United Secession in 1820 and United Presbyterian in 1847. The church was called the First Congregation of Stirling until 1869 when it took the name of John Street church. In 1862 it became Erskine Church, John Street. This was always a large congregation.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—                     FHL Film Number
Baptisms 1739–1795       0889487 item 6
Other:
Minutes 1745–1776, 1796–1865
Accounts 1789–1794
Baptisms 1796–1827
Minutes of Prayer Meetings 1772–1847
Missionary Society Minutes 1835–1865
Seat Rent Accounts 1832–1841
Communion Roll1835
NOTE: Available at the Stirling Council Archives, Stirling, Scotland, records, CH3/559.


Viewfield Associate Session, Anti-Burgher

History—
This congregation, long known as the Second Congregation, or Back-of-Town Church, originated with the minority of the First congregation who adhered to the General Associate Anti-burgher Synod at the Breach in 1747. The congregation became United Secession in 1820 and United Presbyterian in 1847. A first church was built in 1752. A new church opened for public worship in 1860.
Source: Annals and Statistics of the United Presbyterian Church, by Rev. William MacKelvie, D.D., pub. 1873. Film #477618. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—                       FHL Film Number
Baptisms 1749–1775          0889487 item 2
Other:
Minutes 1749–1753
Minutes, Records of Discipline 1753–1756
Note: Available at the Stirling Council Archives, Stirling, Scotland, records, CH3/552.


Stirling Old Light Burgher Church

History—
An Old Light Burgher church existed in Stirling for a time. It likely was formed by those who broke from the Erskine Burgher Church mentioned previously. The Old Light (Original Associate) Burgher Synod was formed in 1805 after a controversy that arose in the Secession churches over the role of secular authorities. The Old Lights believed it was the duty of secular authorities to uphold true religion; while the New Lights, who were in the majority, believed that secular authorities had no power in matters of religion. Most Old Light congregations rejoined the Established Church in 1839, as did this one. Its church building, which was in Spittal Square, was later sold to the South Free Church.
Sources: Various, including those mentioned elsewhere and the New Statistical Account of Scotland for Stirling for 1841. Also, D.J. Steel’s Sources for Scottish Genealogy and Family History for the historical background on the Old Light Burgher Synod.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown. They may have been incorporated into the records of the parish church after 1839.


Stirling Reformed Presbyterian, later Free Church

History—
Cameronian dissenters were to be found in Stirling and its neighborhood from very early times. An accession to their number was made in 1776 when several people left the Erskine Burgher congregation because of dissatisfaction with the settlement of a new minister. This afforded enough strength of numbers for a Stirling congregation to be formed in 1777 when the Northern Scotland congregation was divided. The church was built in 1783. This congregation joined the Free Church in 1876, as did most Reformed Church congregations.
Membership: 1877, 89; 1900, 109.
Sources: The Reformed Presbyterian Church in Scotland, by W.J. Couper, pub. 1925. FHL book 941 K2c. also, Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details are given in the sources including ministers.

Records—
Congregational Minutes - Deacons’ Court 1848–1908
Seat Letting Book 1785–1791, 2 vols.
Treasurer’s Accounts 1843–1870
Baptismal Register 1849–1907
Proclamations 1849–1851
Communion Roll 1849–1908
Note: Available at the Stirling Council Archives, Stirling, Scotland, record CH3/785.


Stirling North Free Church

History—
Dr. Beith, minister of the North Church, and a large congregation “came out” in 1843. They worshiped for a time in the Corn Exchange. The church was built in 1843–1844. A new church was erected in 1853. A manse was subsequently purchased.
Membership: 1848, 600; 1900, 796.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
Scroll Deacons’ Court Minutes 1851–1914
Treasurer’s Accounts 1843–1908
Minutes 1843–1895
Note: Available at the Stirling Council Archives, Stirling, Scotland, record CH3/786.


Stirling South Free Church

History—
The minister of the third charge of Stirling practically “came out” before the Disruption. He formed his congregation in Spittal Square Church, which had been bought from the Old Light Burgher congregation.
Membership: 1848, 301; 1900, 325.
Source: Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843–1900, ed. Rev. William Ewing, D.D., 2 vols. pub. 1914. Film #918572. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
Deacons’ Court Minutes 1843–1856
Note: Available at the Stirling Council Archives, Stirling, Scotland, record CH3/537.


Stirling Independent Church

History—
A church was formed in August 1804 by eleven persons who had been meeting together in fellowship and prayer and had adopted Congregational principles. Membership in 1807 was forty and a pastor was settled. They met in various locations until they acquired a church building in Murray Place in 1842. This church closed in 1923.
Source: A History of Scottish Congregationalism, by Harry Escott, pub. 1960. FHL book 941 K2es. More details may be given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown. For information write to:
The United Reformed Church, Scottish Synod Office
PO Box 189
240 Cathedral Street
Glasgow G1 2BX, Scotland


Stirling Baptist Church

History—
The first Baptist church in Stirling was of the old Scotch Baptist type, founded in 1805. It ceased about 1844. The existing church was an offshoot from the Scotch church about 1810. No records of this church exist before 1825. They met on Port Street until 1842 then removed to Spittal Street where they met until the present (1926) church was built in 1854.
Source: History of the Baptists in Scotland, by Rev. George Yuille, pub. 1926; FHL book 941 K2hi. More details are given in the source including a list of ministers.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown. For information write to:
The Baptist Union of Scotland
12 Aytoun Road
Glasgow G41 5RT
Scotland


Stirling Methodist Church

History—
The first chapel was opened in 1844 and it was still in use a hundred years later.

Records—
The extent of records is unknown. For information contact:
Stirling Methodist Church
Stirling FK9 5PP
Scotland


Roman Catholic Church

History—
The congregation was formed about 1831 and the church was consecrated to St. Mary in 1838.

Records—
Baptisms 1831–1855
Marriages 1831–1855
Note: Available online for a fee, at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk, Edinburgh, record RH21/82.


Stirling Branch,The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter–Day Saints

Records—                                      FHL Film Number
Record of Members, 1842–1849         0104155 item 15
 

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  • This page was last modified on 26 October 2010, at 19:38.
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