African-American Resources for Michigan

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''[[United States]]  [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[Michigan]]  [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[African-American_Resources_for_Michigan|African Americans]]''  
 
''[[United States]]  [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[Michigan]]  [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  [[African-American_Resources_for_Michigan|African Americans]]''  
  
In the 1796 Detroit census both slaves and free African Americans are listed. The abolitionist movement was strong and the part of the "underground railroad" ran through Michigan. In 1855 the state passed a "personal liberty law" blocking the recovery of fugitive slaves. The automobile industry attracted African Americans to Detroit in the 1900s.<ref>Alice Eichholz, ed., ''Red book : American state, county and town sources'' (Provo, Utah: Ancestry, 2004), 343. ({{FHL|973 D27rb}}). [http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/55947869 WorldCat entry].</ref>  
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In the 1796 Detroit census both slaves and free African Americans are listed. The abolitionist movement was strong and the part of a "underground railroad" ran through Michigan. In 1855 the state passed a "personal liberty law" blocking the recovery of fugitive slaves. The automobile industry attracted African Americans to Detroit in the 1900s.<ref>Alice Eichholz, ed., ''Red book : American state, county and town sources'' (Provo, Utah: Ancestry, 2004), 343. ({{FHL|973 D27rb}}). [http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/55947869 WorldCat entry].</ref>  
  
 
The Burton Historical Collection has African American records. For further reading, see:  
 
The Burton Historical Collection has African American records. For further reading, see:  

Revision as of 17:16, 14 September 2010

United States  Gotoarrow.png  Michigan  Gotoarrow.png  African Americans

In the 1796 Detroit census both slaves and free African Americans are listed. The abolitionist movement was strong and the part of a "underground railroad" ran through Michigan. In 1855 the state passed a "personal liberty law" blocking the recovery of fugitive slaves. The automobile industry attracted African Americans to Detroit in the 1900s.[1]

The Burton Historical Collection has African American records. For further reading, see:

  • Melvin E. Banner, Black Pioneer in Michigan (Midland, Mich.: Pendall Publ., 1973. WorldCat entry.
  • Reginald Larrie, Black Experiences in Michigan History. Lansing, Mich.: MI History Div., 1975. WorldCat entry.
  • State Archives of Michigan, Circular No. 29, African-Americans. Lansing, Mich.: SAM, 2002.

Sources

  1. Alice Eichholz, ed., Red book : American state, county and town sources (Provo, Utah: Ancestry, 2004), 343. (FHL 973 D27rb). WorldCat entry.