Alaska Land and Property

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The first Organic Act, passed in 1884, extended the laws of Oregon to Alaska. Alaska became a public domain state, in which unclaimed land was surveyed and sold by the federal government. The first general land office was established at Sitka, Alaska in 1885.
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''[[United States|United States]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[United States Land and Property|U.S. Land and Property]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Alaska|Alaska]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Alaska Land and Property|Land and Property]]''
  
The National Archives has land-entry case files and a card index to 1908 containing only 56 cash entries and 133 homestead patents for the entire state. Patents, tract books, and township plats are at:
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== History  ==
  
'''Bureau of Land Management'''<br>222 W. 7th Avenue #13 <br>Anchorage AK 99513-7599<br>Telephone 907-271-5555 <br>Fax 907-272-3430<br>Internet: http://www.blm.gov/ak/st/en.html<br>
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The first Organic Act, passed in 1884, extended the laws of Oregon to Alaska. [[Alaska|Alaska]] became a public domain state, in which unclaimed land was surveyed and sold by the federal government. The first general land office was established at Sitka, Alaska in 1885.  
  
The National Archives—Pacific Alaska Region (Seattle) at http://www.archives.gov/pacific-alaska/seattle/ has copies of the tract books, township plats, and other records of the general land offices. The Alaska State Archives has descriptions and maps of mining claims.
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== Availability  ==
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The National Archives has land-entry case files and a card index to 1908 containing only 56 cash entries and 133 homestead patents for the entire state. Patents, tract books, and township plats are at:
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:'''Bureau of Land Management'''<br>
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:222 W. 7th Avenue #13 <br>
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:Anchorage AK 99513-7599<br>
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:Telephone 907-271-5555 <br>
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:Fax 907-272-3430<br>
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:[http://www.blm.gov/ak/st/en.html Website]
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The [http://www.archives.gov/pacific-alaska/seattle/ National Archives—Pacific Alaska Region] (Seattle) has copies of the tract books, township plats, and other records of the general land offices. The [http://www.archives.state.ak.us/ Alaska State Archives] has descriptions and maps of mining claims.  
  
 
Land that had been transferred by sale or grant to private ownership could be sold again, inherited, lost by foreclosure of a mortgage, or distributed through a divorce. Records of these subsequent transactions, including deeds, mortgages, and other property records, are filed at the office of the district recorder in each judicial district. The Family History Library has not acquired copies of the land records available in Alaska.
 
Land that had been transferred by sale or grant to private ownership could be sold again, inherited, lost by foreclosure of a mortgage, or distributed through a divorce. Records of these subsequent transactions, including deeds, mortgages, and other property records, are filed at the office of the district recorder in each judicial district. The Family History Library has not acquired copies of the land records available in Alaska.
  
[[Category:Alaska]]
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== References  ==
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{{Alaska|Alaska}} {{U.S. Land and Property}}
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[[Category:Alaska|Land]]

Revision as of 20:43, 26 April 2012

United States Gotoarrow.png U.S. Land and Property Gotoarrow.png Alaska Gotoarrow.png Land and Property

History

The first Organic Act, passed in 1884, extended the laws of Oregon to Alaska. Alaska became a public domain state, in which unclaimed land was surveyed and sold by the federal government. The first general land office was established at Sitka, Alaska in 1885.

Availability

The National Archives has land-entry case files and a card index to 1908 containing only 56 cash entries and 133 homestead patents for the entire state. Patents, tract books, and township plats are at:

Bureau of Land Management
222 W. 7th Avenue #13
Anchorage AK 99513-7599
Telephone 907-271-5555
Fax 907-272-3430
Website

The National Archives—Pacific Alaska Region (Seattle) has copies of the tract books, township plats, and other records of the general land offices. The Alaska State Archives has descriptions and maps of mining claims.

Land that had been transferred by sale or grant to private ownership could be sold again, inherited, lost by foreclosure of a mortgage, or distributed through a divorce. Records of these subsequent transactions, including deeds, mortgages, and other property records, are filed at the office of the district recorder in each judicial district. The Family History Library has not acquired copies of the land records available in Alaska.

References