Alexandria, Virginia

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==== Newspapers  ====
 
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Indexed images of the [http://research.history.org/DigitalLibrary/BrowseVG.cfm Virginia
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Gazette ](1736-1780) are available online through the [http://www.colonialwilliamsburg.org/ Colonial Williamsburg ]website. In addition,
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Professor Tom Costa and The Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia have created a database of all runaway advertisements for slaves, indentured servants, transported convicts, and ship deserters listed in this source and other Virginia newspapers (1736-1803), see: [http://www2.vcdh.virginia.edu/gos/ The Geography of Slavery in Virginia]. These newspapers are valuable resources for all regions of Virginia.
  
 
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==== Probate  ====

Revision as of 16:08, 26 January 2010

United States  > Virginia > Alexandria (Independent City)

Contents

Courthouse

History

  • First settlement established in 1695. Named for Capt. Philip Alexander. Alexandria was not incorporated until 1779.
  • In 1755, General Edward Braddock organized his fatal expediation against Fort Duquesne (near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) at Carlyle House.
  • April 1755, the governors of Virginia, and the Provinces of Maryland, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and New York met to determine concerted action against the French in America.
  • 1791, Alexandria was included in an area chosen by George Washington to become the District of Columbia. Alexandria along with Arlington County were retroceded back to Virginia in 1846.
  • City of Alexandria was re-chartered in 1852.
  • 1828-1836, Alexandria was home to the Franklin and Armfield slave market.
  • During the Civil War, the slave pen owned by Price, Birch & Co. became a jail under Union occupation.
  • Alexandria was occupied by the Federal troops at the start of the Civil War and remained occupied until the end of the war.
  • 1863 (when West Virginia was divided from Virginia) until end of the Civil War, Alexandria was the seat of the Restored Government of Virginia.
  • 1870, the City of Alexandria became independent of Alexandria County. The rest of Alexandria County became Arlington County in 1920, ending years of confusion.

Parent County

1847--Alexandria was created 13 March 1847 from Fairfax County. [1]

Boundary Changes

Record Loss

Places/Localities

Populated Places

Arlandria . Del Rey . Hume. The Landmark . Mount Ida . North Ridge . Old Town . Saint Elmo . Seminary Hill . Seminary West . Town of Potomac (1930) . The Berg . West End . West of Quaker

Neighboring Counties

Arlington | Fairfax | District of Columbia

Resources

Cemeteries

For a more detailed list, including addresses, phone numbers, and external links, see Alexandria, Virginia Cemeteries.

The following is a list of cemeteries in Alexandria:[2]

  • Alexandria National Cemetery
  • Ivy Hill Cemetery
  • Saint Mary's Cemetery
  • Shuters Hill Cemetery

Church

Court

Indexes and images to Alexandria City, Virginia Chancery Records 1859-1925 are available online through Virginia Memory: Chancery Records Index. These records, which were often concerned with inheritance disputes, contain a wealth of genealogical detail.

Land

Local Histories

Maps

Military

Newspapers

Indexed images of the [http://research.history.org/DigitalLibrary/BrowseVG.cfm Virginia Gazette ](1736-1780) are available online through the Colonial Williamsburg website. In addition, Professor Tom Costa and The Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia have created a database of all runaway advertisements for slaves, indentured servants, transported convicts, and ship deserters listed in this source and other Virginia newspapers (1736-1803), see: The Geography of Slavery in Virginia. These newspapers are valuable resources for all regions of Virginia.

Probate

Taxation

Vital Records

Societies and Libraries

Websites

  • USGenWeb project. May have maps, name indexes, history or other information for this county. Select the state, then the county.
  • Family History Library Catalog

References

  1. The Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America,10th ed. (Draper, UT:Everton Publishers, 2002).
  2. USGS Map, Topozone.com