Arizona African Americans

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*[http://www.worldcat.org/title/first-100-years-a-history-of-arizona-blacks/oclc/436317469&referer=brief_results Harris, Richard E. The First 100 Years: A History of Arizona Blacks. Apache Junction, AZ: Relmo Publishers, 1983.]
  
 
== <br>Websites  ==
 
== <br>Websites  ==

Revision as of 00:17, 23 October 2013

United Statesgo toArizona go toAfrican Americans


Contents

Introduction


A Research Strategy


Archives and Libraries

Pioneer Museum (Flagstaff)

2340 N. Fort Valley Road
Flagstaff, AZ 86001
Phone: 928-774-6272
Email: AHSFlagstaff@azhs.gov
Website

Hours: Mon. – Sat. 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Sunday: Closed except during special events.

The Pioneer Museum has a few collections documenting African American pioneers. See Black Genesis for reference to Beppie Culin Papers (1850-1900) on page 64 which contain 324 bills of sale for slaves.

Vital Records

Birth Records

Marriage Records

Death Records


Biography


Census


Churches

Phoenix
Tucson

African Americans are represented mainly in five categories: Baptist, Methodist, Church of God in Christ, Church of Christ, and Apostolic.


Funeral Homes


Genealogy


History

The bibliography, Trailtones: The African-American Heritage of Arizona, compiled by Gloria L. Smith contains materials that highlight African-American heritage in Arizona.  

Probably the first person of African heritage who came to this area was a member of a Spanish expedition.  Esteban was originally from Morocco, and was a slave to a Spaniard. He first arrived in the New World in 1528.  See Esteban, a 16th Century Explorer.

Also see:


Newspapers


Military


Probate Records


School Records


Societies and Organizations


Voting Registers


Other Sources


Websites


References