Austria Jewish Records

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==Jewish Records of Vienna==
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When Poland was partitioned among its neighbors in 1795, the Austrian Empire (later the Austro-Hungarian Empire) received the southeastern portion of the country heavily populated by the Jews, which it named Galicia. Since internal boundaries did not exist within the Austrian Empire, many impoverished Galician Jews migrated to the capital, Vienna. '''By the end of the 19th century, Vienna had become a major center of European Jewry. On the eve of World War II, it had the third largest Jewish population in Europe''' (after Warsaw and Budapest).
  
 
[[Category:Austria]]
 
[[Category:Austria]]

Revision as of 17:31, 27 October 2010

Back to Austria Page

For information regarding Jewish persons in Austria during the Holocaust please check Dokumentationsarchiv des Österreichischen Widerstandes .

List of People Expelled from the University of Vienna in 1938
It was reported on JewishGen that the University of Vienna has published a database of 2,700 persons, mostly Jews, who were discharged or expelled in 1938. Among these persons are professors, students and employees of the university. This database is available at http://gedenkbuch.univie.ac.at. 

http://www.iajgs.org/cemetery/austria/index.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/AustriaCzech/towns/gundframe1.html

www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/ausguide.htm

Jewish Records of Vienna

When Poland was partitioned among its neighbors in 1795, the Austrian Empire (later the Austro-Hungarian Empire) received the southeastern portion of the country heavily populated by the Jews, which it named Galicia. Since internal boundaries did not exist within the Austrian Empire, many impoverished Galician Jews migrated to the capital, Vienna. By the end of the 19th century, Vienna had become a major center of European Jewry. On the eve of World War II, it had the third largest Jewish population in Europe (after Warsaw and Budapest).