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POPULATION REGISTERS

for individual residents of the city of Vienna, Austria. The cards include name, birth date and place, marital status, old and new places of residence, dates of arrival and departure. Occasionally the name of spouse and children are listed. Most records range from 1890 to 1925. The beginning surname on each microfilm is shown. The same name may also appear on the preceding microfilm. All male (männliche) names are filed first, followed by all female (weibliche) names in a separate sequence.

HOUSEHOLD REGISTRATION CARDS

for families living in the city of Vienna, Austria. The cards contain the name of the head of the household, spouse and children and include birth dates and places, occupation, religion, dates and places of former and current residences. The records were compiled from 1940 1948, but contain genealogical data often from earlier years. The beginning surname on each microfilm is shown. The same name may also appear on the preceding microfilm.

PHONETIC FILING ORDER OF NAMES:

An unusually complex system was used for filing surnames. This system files letters of the alphabet in a different sequence than usual. The following instructions are recommended to help locate the surname you are seeking in these files. Here are described the values of the letters of the alphabet, and their unusual filing orders.

THE ALPHABET:

(A), (Au), (E, Ä, Ö), (Ei, Eu, Ej, Ey, Ai, Aj, Ay), (I, Ie, J, Ü, Y), (O, Ou), (U), (B, P), (C, G, K, Q, X, Ch, Ck, Cs, Cz, Ks), (D, T, Th), (F, V, W), (H), (L), (M), (N, Nck, Ng, Nk), (R), (S, Sch, Sz, , Cz, Tsch, Tz, Z).

Note that all vowels are filed before the consonants, rather than in their normal alphabetic sequence. Letters or combinations of letters within the same parenthesis are used interchangeably and thus not regarded as different in filing. Each of the letters or combination of letters occupy one space in the filing sequence.

SPECIAL FILING RULES FOR SPECIFIC LETTERS:

Double letters with one sound are filed as one (Ott). Double letters with two sounds are filed separately (Ollerieth).  and Cz are filed as C when it is at the first of the word (Czermak).  and Cz are filed as S when not at the first of the word (Baczek). E is disregarded in filing when it is not voiced (-el, -er, ie). E is filed as E when it is voiced (Noel). H is filed as H when it is the first letter of the word (Hermann). H is filed as C within a word if it is voiced (Neuhofer). H is disregarded in filing when it is not voiced (ah, eh, ih, oh, uh, ch, gh, ph, th) (Rohrer).

Names beginning with vowels are filed by the first vowel sound, and then by the next vowel sound if present, and then by the first consonant sound. They are then filed by the second consonant sound grouped in order first by the vowels preceding the second consonant. Names with no vowels preceding the second consonant are filed following those that have vowels between the first and second consonants. This pattern continues until the end of the word, filing by each consonant, first running through all the vowels preceding that consonant.

Names beginning with consonants are filed together with their sound alike group. After the first consonant sound, names are filed by the second consonant sound grouped in order first by all of the vowels preceding the second consonant. Names with no vowel preceding the second consonant are filed following those that have vowels between the consonants. This pattern continues for the entire name.

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. First convert the spelling of the surname you want to find by writing it according to the phonetic letters outlined below.

2. Then substitute the first letter of the phonetic group for the other letters in the same group.

3. Then find the surname in the library catalog list according to the special filing rules outlined, and note the film number associated with it.

4. Check to make sure you have the right selection by converting the catalog listed surnames to their phonetic spellings also.

EXAMPLE SPELLINGS:

Name Phonetic Spelling

Pelzer Belsr Prajka Breica Gröpel Crebl Kruppner Crubnr Tryzubsky Drisubski Dwornik Dfornic Waldhauser Faldcausr Florimund Florimund Viertelbock Firdlboc Holzmüller Holsmilr Lomatschenko Lomasenco Muckenschnabel Mucnsnabl Neubinger Neibingr Röntgentaler Rendcndalr Scheichel Seicl Schäfer Sefr Staininger Sdeiningr

Slutzko Slusco Zweyacker Sfeiacr Zöhner Senr

EXAMPLE FILING SEQUENCES:

Name Phonetic Spelling

Kahovec Cacofec Gager Cacr Keck Cec Cechota Cecoda Gegner Cecnr Geiger Ceicr Kiegler Ciclr Koch Coc Couquelet Couceld Kukel Cucl Kugler Cuclr Kuhecz Cucs Kadlec Cadlec Chader Cadr Kautor Caudr Cautillon Caudilon Czettel Cedl Geider Ceidr Kittler Cidlr Gottfried Codfrid Gottlieb Codlib Koutroumbopoulos Coudroumboboulos Gutt Cud Gutleber Cudlebr Czudnowski Cudnofsci Kafka Cafca Gavrilovic Cafrilofic Kaufmann Caufman Giovanetti Ciofanedi Kovacs Cofac Kovarik Cofaric Cufer Cufr Gföhler Cfelr Cwitl Cfidl Gall Cal Chalupa Caluba Kalch Calc Ruzicka Rusica Sabata Sabada Schauperl Saubrl Seeber Sebr Schey Sei Seiber Seibr Seibert Seibrd Schippani Sibani Schop Sob Sobolew Sobolef Schober Sobr Schuh Su Schubert Subrt Spang Sbang Spaek Sbasec Spendal Sbendal Sperling Sberling Spielbichler Sbilbiclr Spirk Sbirc Spitzner Sbisnr Sporer Sborr Springer Sbringr Sax Sac Sacher Sacr Szekely Seceli Scheichl Seicl Siegfried Sicfrid Siegl Sicl Siegmund Sicmund Sykora Sicora Soukup Soucub Szobol Socol Sukalavopulos Sucalafobulos Suchentrunk Sucendrung Skala Scala Skaral Scaral Scocic Scocic Skutezky Scudeski Skleta Scleda Sadlo Sadlo Schatra Sadra Sedlnitzky Sedlniski Sedlarik Sedlaric Sedlaczek Sedlasec


A wiki article describing tis collection is found at:

Austria Vienna Population Cards (FamilySearch Historical Records)


 

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