British Columbia, Crown Land Pre-emption Registers (FamilySearch Historical Records)

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== Record Description  ==
 
== Record Description  ==
  
This collection contains registers of pre-emptions which is purchased land that has not been fully surveyed. The registers summarize the information from the pre-emption certificates. The pre-emptions are listed in numerical order, with an alphabetical index at the back of each volume.  
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These records include registers of pre-emptions which is purchased land that has not been fully surveyed. The registers summarize the information from the pre-emption certificates. The pre-emptions are listed in numerical order, with an alphabetical index at the back of each volume.  
  
 
Many people in [[Canada]] owned land and thus a very high percentage of the population is named in land records. The availability of land attracted many immigrants to Canada and encouraged westward expansion.  
 
Many people in [[Canada]] owned land and thus a very high percentage of the population is named in land records. The availability of land attracted many immigrants to Canada and encouraged westward expansion.  
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Image:British Columbia Crown Land Pre-emption Registers DGS 7206612 219.jpg
 
Image:British Columbia Crown Land Pre-emption Registers DGS 7206612 219.jpg
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These land records may contain the following information&nbsp;:  
 
These land records may contain the following information&nbsp;:  

Revision as of 17:00, 10 June 2013

FamilySearch Record Search This article describes a collection of historical records scheduled to become available at FamilySearch.org.

Contents

Record Description

These records include registers of pre-emptions which is purchased land that has not been fully surveyed. The registers summarize the information from the pre-emption certificates. The pre-emptions are listed in numerical order, with an alphabetical index at the back of each volume.

Many people in Canada owned land and thus a very high percentage of the population is named in land records. The availability of land attracted many immigrants to Canada and encouraged westward expansion.

Land ownership was generally recorded in an area as soon as settlers began to arrive. These were often the first records available in an area.

In eastern Canada, most land records begin in the late 1700s. They include land petitions, fiats and warrants, land grants and patents, and deeds. The federal homestead era in the Prairie Provinces lasted almost 60 years (1872 to 1930). Homestead record files cover all those years.

The British Columbia Archives has a research guide about the pre-emption process used in Canada.

Citation for This Collection

The following citation refers to the original source of the information published in FamilySearch.org Historical Record collections. Sources include the author, custodian, publisher and archive for the original records.

"British Columbia, Crown Land Pre-emption Registers, 1860-1971". Images. FamilySearch.org http://Familysearch.org accessed : 2013. Citing British Columbia Information Management Services. British Columbia Archives, Victoria.

Suggested citation format for a record in this collection.

Record Content

These land records may contain the following information :

  • Name and age of landowner
  • Name of spouse
  • Names of children, heirs, relatives, and neighbors.
  • Place where landowner lived previously.
  • Occupation.

How to Use the Record

To begin your search for land records, it would be helpful if you knew the following information:

  • Name of ancestor
  • Place of residence

Search The Collection

To search the collection image by image, select "Browse through images" on the initial collection page:
⇒Select the appropriate "District"
⇒Select the appropriate "Register Number, Volume Number and Years" category which will take you to the images.

Look at each image comparing the information with what you already know about your ancestors to determine which one is your ancestor. You may need to compare the information about more than one person to make this determination.

Unable to Find Your Ancestor?

  • Search the Canadian Census to locate your ancestor’s residence.
  • Search for the name of the spouse instead of your deceased ancestor.

Related Websites

Related Wiki Articles

Contributions to This Article

We welcome user additions to FamilySearch Historical Records wiki articles. Guidelines are available to help you make changes. Thank you for any contributions you may provide. If you would like to get more involved join the WikiProject FamilySearch Records.

Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections

When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you searched for in the records.

A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections.

Citation Example for a Record Found in This Collection

“Argentina, Buenos Aires, Catholic Church Records, 1635-1981,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed 28 February, 2012), La Plata > San Ponciano > Matrimonios 1884-1886 > image 71 of 389 images, Artemio Avendano and Clementina Peralta, 1884; citing Parroquia de San Ponciano en la Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Matrimonios. San Ponciano, La Plata, Buenos Aires.