Castle Dome County, Arizona

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''[[United States|United States]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Arizona|Arizona]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Castle_Dome_County,_Arizona|Castle Dome County]]''  
 
''[[United States|United States]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Arizona|Arizona]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Castle_Dome_County,_Arizona|Castle Dome County]]''  
  
'''Castle Dome County''' was a proposed county in a proposed new territory that was never approved and never existed.<ref>Thomas Edwin Farish, ''History of Arizona'' (Phoenix, Ariz., 1915), 1:324. [{{babhat}}].</ref>
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'''Castle Dome County''' was proposed in 1860 for the self-declared Arizona Territory and a territorial government was created. But the US congress rejected the idea. However if a county government was set up, some county records may have been created. Then in 1861, the Arizona Territory chose to be part of the Confederate States of America. But when Union forces took over in 1862, any county government still existing would have been shut down. The location of any county records, if they exist, has yet to be discovered.
  
In 1857 the people of [[Arizona]] (at the time the southern part of modern Arizona and [[New Mexico]]) sent Sylvester Mowry to Congress to petition for creation of a new Arizona Territory carved from part of New Mexico Territory. Mowry drew up a map with four proposed counties:  
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*5 Apr 1860 - An unofficial convention held in Tucson declared the creation of the Territory of Arizona from the southern half of New Mexico Territory below 34 degrees north latitude and proposed 4 counties for the new territory: Castle Dome, Ewell, Mesilla, and Dona Ana. They also created a provisional constitution and established a government.<ref>Early Arizona: Prehistory to Civil War, Jay J. Wagoner, The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 1975, p 370</ref> <ref>Thomas Edwin Farish, ''History of Arizona'' (Phoenix, Ariz., 1915), 1:324. [{{babhat}}].</ref> <ref>Sacks, 36, 151; Swindler, 1:244-248</ref> But the US Congress rejected the idea of Arizona becoming a territory, just as they had eight times before.<ref>Be it Enacted: The Creation of the Territory of Arizona, B. Sacks, Arizona Historical Foundation, Phoenix, 1964, pp 25-30</ref> So the proposed new territory was never officially created. However this time was different, because a government had been created for the intended Arizona Territory.
 
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*16 Mar 1861 - Another unofficial convention met in Mesilla and declared that the territory formed the previous year was part of the Confederacy. An ordinance was written stating the reasons Arizona had seceded from the United States.<ref>Be it Enacted: The Creation of the Territory of Arizona, B. Sacks, Arizona Historical Foundation, Phoenix, 1964, p 59</ref><br>
:*'''''[[Castle_Dome_County,_Arizona|Castle Dome County]]&nbsp;''''' in present-day [[Yuma County, Arizona]]
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*28 Mar 1861 - Another convention held in Tucson ratified the Mesilla secession ordinance. Some government organization was made, including sending a delegate to the Confederate Congress.<ref>Be it Enacted: The Creation of the Territory of Arizona, B. Sacks, Arizona Historical Foundation, Phoenix, 1964, p 59</ref> <ref>Early Arizona: Prehistory to Civil War, Jay J. Wagoner, The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 1975, p 446</ref><br>
:*'''''[[Ewell County, Arizona|Ewell County]]&nbsp;''''' in present-day [[Pima County, Arizona]] extended east to [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apache_Pass Apache Pass] in [[Cochise County, Arizona]]
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*1 Aug 1861 - Confederate General John Robert Baylor, fresh from his victory at the Battle of Mesilla, made a proclamation declaring Arizona to be a Confederate Territory and appointed a government.<ref>Be it Enacted: The Creation of the Territory of Arizona, B. Sacks, Arizona Historical Foundation, Phoenix, 1964, p 62</ref> <ref>Early Arizona: Prehistory to Civil War, Jay J. Wagoner, The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 1975, p 372</ref> A judicial district was formed for land around Mesilla and another one for land around Tucson.
:*'''''[[Mesilla County, Arizona|Mesilla County]]&nbsp;''''' from Apache Pass to the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rio_Grande Rio Grande] in present-day [[Cochise County, Arizona]], and [[Hidalgo County, New Mexico|Hidalgo]], [[Grant County, New Mexico|Grant]], [[Luna County, New Mexico|Luna]], [[Sierra County, New Mexico|Sierra]], and [[Dona Ana County, New Mexico|Doña Ana]] counties in New Mexico
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*13 January 1862 - The Confederate Congress passed a bill declaring Arizona to be a Territory of the Confederate States of America. President Jefferson Davis signed the bill, which then became law.<ref>Early Arizona: Prehistory to Civil War, Jay J. Wagoner, The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 1975, p 372</ref> <ref>Journal of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865 (Senate Document 234, 58 Cong., 2 Sess. Serials 4610-4616)</ref><br>
:*'''''[[Dona Ana County, Arizona|Doña Ana County]]&nbsp;''''' from the Rio Grande to [[Texas]] in parts of present-day [[Dona Ana County, New Mexico|Doña Ana]], [[Otero County, New Mexico|Otero]], [[Chaves County, New Mexico|Chaves]], [[Eddy County, New Mexico|Eddy]], and [[Lea County, New Mexico|Lea]] counties in New Mexico
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*14 February 1862 - The Confederate law creating Arizona as a Territory became effective.<ref>Journal of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865 (Senate Document 234, 58 Cong., 2 Sess. Serials 4610-4616)</ref> Note: Fifty years later to the day, Arizona became a state in the United States of America.<br>
 
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*8 June 1862 - US General Carleton proclaimed in Tucson that the Territory of Arizona had been created by the United States and was devoid of all civil government.<ref>Be it Enacted: The Creation of the Territory of Arizona, B. Sacks, Arizona Historical Foundation, Phoenix, 1964, p 68</ref> <ref>Early Arizona: Prehistory to Civil War, Jay J. Wagoner, The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 1975, p 456</ref>
The bill and these proposed counties failed passage. The only known original document mentioning these counties is the map accompanying the failed bill.  
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*8 July 1862 - The last of the Confederate troops left Arizona Territory as Union troops from California and Colorado took over control.
  
 
== References  ==
 
== References  ==

Revision as of 21:10, 4 January 2013

United States Gotoarrow.png Arizona Gotoarrow.png Castle Dome County

Castle Dome County was proposed in 1860 for the self-declared Arizona Territory and a territorial government was created. But the US congress rejected the idea. However if a county government was set up, some county records may have been created. Then in 1861, the Arizona Territory chose to be part of the Confederate States of America. But when Union forces took over in 1862, any county government still existing would have been shut down. The location of any county records, if they exist, has yet to be discovered.

  • 5 Apr 1860 - An unofficial convention held in Tucson declared the creation of the Territory of Arizona from the southern half of New Mexico Territory below 34 degrees north latitude and proposed 4 counties for the new territory: Castle Dome, Ewell, Mesilla, and Dona Ana. They also created a provisional constitution and established a government.[1] [2] [3] But the US Congress rejected the idea of Arizona becoming a territory, just as they had eight times before.[4] So the proposed new territory was never officially created. However this time was different, because a government had been created for the intended Arizona Territory.
  • 16 Mar 1861 - Another unofficial convention met in Mesilla and declared that the territory formed the previous year was part of the Confederacy. An ordinance was written stating the reasons Arizona had seceded from the United States.[5]
  • 28 Mar 1861 - Another convention held in Tucson ratified the Mesilla secession ordinance. Some government organization was made, including sending a delegate to the Confederate Congress.[6] [7]
  • 1 Aug 1861 - Confederate General John Robert Baylor, fresh from his victory at the Battle of Mesilla, made a proclamation declaring Arizona to be a Confederate Territory and appointed a government.[8] [9] A judicial district was formed for land around Mesilla and another one for land around Tucson.
  • 13 January 1862 - The Confederate Congress passed a bill declaring Arizona to be a Territory of the Confederate States of America. President Jefferson Davis signed the bill, which then became law.[10] [11]
  • 14 February 1862 - The Confederate law creating Arizona as a Territory became effective.[12] Note: Fifty years later to the day, Arizona became a state in the United States of America.
  • 8 June 1862 - US General Carleton proclaimed in Tucson that the Territory of Arizona had been created by the United States and was devoid of all civil government.[13] [14]
  • 8 July 1862 - The last of the Confederate troops left Arizona Territory as Union troops from California and Colorado took over control.

References

  1. Early Arizona: Prehistory to Civil War, Jay J. Wagoner, The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 1975, p 370
  2. Thomas Edwin Farish, History of Arizona (Phoenix, Ariz., 1915), 1:324. HathiTrust Digital Library edition.
  3. Sacks, 36, 151; Swindler, 1:244-248
  4. Be it Enacted: The Creation of the Territory of Arizona, B. Sacks, Arizona Historical Foundation, Phoenix, 1964, pp 25-30
  5. Be it Enacted: The Creation of the Territory of Arizona, B. Sacks, Arizona Historical Foundation, Phoenix, 1964, p 59
  6. Be it Enacted: The Creation of the Territory of Arizona, B. Sacks, Arizona Historical Foundation, Phoenix, 1964, p 59
  7. Early Arizona: Prehistory to Civil War, Jay J. Wagoner, The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 1975, p 446
  8. Be it Enacted: The Creation of the Territory of Arizona, B. Sacks, Arizona Historical Foundation, Phoenix, 1964, p 62
  9. Early Arizona: Prehistory to Civil War, Jay J. Wagoner, The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 1975, p 372
  10. Early Arizona: Prehistory to Civil War, Jay J. Wagoner, The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 1975, p 372
  11. Journal of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865 (Senate Document 234, 58 Cong., 2 Sess. Serials 4610-4616)
  12. Journal of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865 (Senate Document 234, 58 Cong., 2 Sess. Serials 4610-4616)
  13. Be it Enacted: The Creation of the Territory of Arizona, B. Sacks, Arizona Historical Foundation, Phoenix, 1964, p 68
  14. Early Arizona: Prehistory to Civil War, Jay J. Wagoner, The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 1975, p 456