Cockersand Abbey, Lancashire

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[[England]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Lancashire]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Lancashire Parishes]]  
 
[[England]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Lancashire]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Lancashire Parishes]]  
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Guide to '''Cockersand Abbey, Lancashire family history and genealogy:''' chapelry register transcripts, census records, birth records, marriage records, and death records.
  
 
[[Image:Cockersand Abbey ruins of Chapter House.jpg|thumb|right]]  
 
[[Image:Cockersand Abbey ruins of Chapter House.jpg|thumb|right]]  
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== Parish History  ==
 
== Parish History  ==
  
Cockersand Abbey is a former abbey near Cockerham in the City of Lancaster district of Lancashire, England. It was founded before 1184 as the Hospital of St Mary on the marsh belonging to Leicester Abbey. It was refounded as a Premonstratensian priory and subsequently elevated to an abbey in 1192. It also continued as a hospital.  
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COCKERSAND-ABBEY, an '''extra-parochial liberty''', in the union of Lancaster, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 7 miles (S. W. by S.) from Lancaster. It was a former abbey near Cockerham in the City of Lancaster district of Lancashire, England. It was founded before 1184 as the Hospital of St Mary on the marsh belonging to Leicester Abbey. It was refounded as a Premonstratensian priory and subsequently elevated to an abbey in 1192. It also continued as a hospital. Since Cokersand Abbey is an extra parochial place it is necessary to search [[Cockerham, Lancashire]] [[Overton, Lancashire]] records for events.<ref>Lewis, Samuel A.,[http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50887#s25 ''A Topographical Dictionary of England]'' (1848), pp. 647-654. Date accessed: 17 September 2013.w.</ref>
  
The abbey was dissolved in 1539 and acquired by a John Kitchen. The site is now adjacent to a farm house and the only significant relic is the still intact, vaulted chapter house which was built in 1230 and used as a family mausoleum by the Daltons of Thurnham Hall during the 18th and 19th centuries. There are some fragmentaryy remains of the church adjacent.  
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The abbey was dissolved in 1539 and acquired by a John Kitchen. The site is now adjacent to a farm house and the only significant relic is the still intact, vaulted chapter house which was built in 1230 and used as a family mausoleum by the Daltons of Thurnham Hall during the 18th and 19th centuries. There are some fragmentary remains of the church adjacent.  
  
The chapter house is a Grade I listed building and Scheduled Ancient Monument. In 2007 English Heritage made an £80,000 grant to the owner to help preserve the building. There is no public access to the chapter house.
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Two Roman silver statuettes were discovered on Cockersand Moss near the abbey site in 1718, possibly indicating the presence of a Romano-British shrine nearby.<br><br>  
 
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Two Roman silver statuettes were discovered on Cockersand Moss near the abbey site in 1718, possibly indicating the presence of a Romano-British shrine nearby.<br><br>
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Since Cokersand Abbey is an extra parochial place it is necessary to search&nbsp;[[Cockerham, Lancashire]] [[Overton, Lancashire]] records for events.<br>
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"COCKERSAND-ABBEY, '''an extra-parochial liberty''', in the union of Lancaster, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 7 miles southwest by south&nbsp;from Lancaster.<ref>&amp;nbsp;''[[A Topographical Dictionary of England]]'' by Samuel Lewis (1848), pp. 647-654. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50887 Date accessed: 29 June 2010.</ref>&nbsp;See an excellent 19th Century&nbsp;perspective&nbsp;on this place in the footnote below.
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== Resources  ==
 
== Resources  ==
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Birth, marriages and deaths were kept by the government, from July 1837 to the present day. The civil registration article tells more about these records. There are several Internet sites with name lists or indexes. A popular site is [http://freebmd.org.uk/ FreeBMD].  
 
Birth, marriages and deaths were kept by the government, from July 1837 to the present day. The civil registration article tells more about these records. There are several Internet sites with name lists or indexes. A popular site is [http://freebmd.org.uk/ FreeBMD].  
  
Online index of Lancashire Births, Marriages and Deaths [[Lancashire BMD]]<br>
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Online index of Lancashire Births, Marriages and Deaths [[Lancashire BMD]]<br>  
  
 
==== Lancashire Online Parish Clerks  ====
 
==== Lancashire Online Parish Clerks  ====
  
An extremely useful resource for research in Lancashire Parishes http://www.lan-opc.org.uk/<br>
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An extremely useful resource for research in Lancashire Parishes http://www.lan-opc.org.uk/<br>  
  
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<br>  
  
 
==== Church records  ====
 
==== Church records  ====
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==== Census records  ====
 
==== Census records  ====
  
{{Expand section|any unique information, such as ''the census for X year was destroyed''}}  
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{{British Census|306936}}  
  
http://www.1881pubs.com/ for details of public houses in the 1881 census
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<br>
  
==== Poor Law Unions<br> ====
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==== Poor Law Unions<br> ====
  
 
[[Lancaster Poor Law Union,Lancashire]]  
 
[[Lancaster Poor Law Union,Lancashire]]  
  
==== Probate records<br> ====
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==== Probate records<br> ====
  
 
Records of wills, administrations, inventories, indexes, etc. were filed by the court with jurisdiction over this parish. Go to [[Lancashire Probate Records|Lancashire Probate Records]] to find the name of the court having primary jurisdiction. Scroll down in the article to the section Court Jurisdictions by Parish.  
 
Records of wills, administrations, inventories, indexes, etc. were filed by the court with jurisdiction over this parish. Go to [[Lancashire Probate Records|Lancashire Probate Records]] to find the name of the court having primary jurisdiction. Scroll down in the article to the section Court Jurisdictions by Parish.  
  
==== Maps and Gazetteers<br> ====
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==== Maps and Gazetteers<br> ====
  
Maps are a visual look at the locations in England. Gazetteers contain brief summaries about a place.<br>
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Maps are a visual look at the locations in England. Gazetteers contain brief summaries about a place.<br>  
  
 
*[http://maps.familysearch.org/ England Jurisdictions 1851]  
 
*[http://maps.familysearch.org/ England Jurisdictions 1851]  
 
*[http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/index.jsp Vision of Britain]
 
*[http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/index.jsp Vision of Britain]
  
==== Bibliography<br> ====
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==== Bibliography<br> ====
  
 
*Anthony New. A Guide to the Abbeys of England And Wales, pp. 116–117. Constable.  
 
*Anthony New. A Guide to the Abbeys of England And Wales, pp. 116–117. Constable.  
 
*Houses of Premonstratensian canons: The abbey of Cockersand, A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 2 (1908), pp. 154–59. <br><br>
 
*Houses of Premonstratensian canons: The abbey of Cockersand, A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 2 (1908), pp. 154–59. <br><br>
  
== Web sites  ==
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Add any relevant sites that aren’t mentioned above.
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== References  ==
  
== Reference<br> ==
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{{Reflist}}<br>  
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== Web sites  ==
  
{{Reflist}}
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{{Lancashire}}
  
 
[[Category:Lancashire]]
 
[[Category:Lancashire]]

Revision as of 17:24, 26 September 2013

England Gotoarrow.png Lancashire Gotoarrow.png Lancashire Parishes

Guide to Cockersand Abbey, Lancashire family history and genealogy: chapelry register transcripts, census records, birth records, marriage records, and death records.

Cockersand Abbey ruins of Chapter House.jpg

Contents

Parish History

COCKERSAND-ABBEY, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Lancaster, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 7 miles (S. W. by S.) from Lancaster. It was a former abbey near Cockerham in the City of Lancaster district of Lancashire, England. It was founded before 1184 as the Hospital of St Mary on the marsh belonging to Leicester Abbey. It was refounded as a Premonstratensian priory and subsequently elevated to an abbey in 1192. It also continued as a hospital. Since Cokersand Abbey is an extra parochial place it is necessary to search Cockerham, Lancashire Overton, Lancashire records for events.[1]

The abbey was dissolved in 1539 and acquired by a John Kitchen. The site is now adjacent to a farm house and the only significant relic is the still intact, vaulted chapter house which was built in 1230 and used as a family mausoleum by the Daltons of Thurnham Hall during the 18th and 19th centuries. There are some fragmentary remains of the church adjacent.

Two Roman silver statuettes were discovered on Cockersand Moss near the abbey site in 1718, possibly indicating the presence of a Romano-British shrine nearby.

Resources

Civil Registration

Birth, marriages and deaths were kept by the government, from July 1837 to the present day. The civil registration article tells more about these records. There are several Internet sites with name lists or indexes. A popular site is FreeBMD.

Online index of Lancashire Births, Marriages and Deaths Lancashire BMD

Lancashire Online Parish Clerks

An extremely useful resource for research in Lancashire Parishes http://www.lan-opc.org.uk/


Church records

Include here information for parish registers, Bishop’s Transcripts and other types of church records, such as parish chest records. Add the contact information for the office holding the original records. Add links to the Family History Library Catalog showing the film numbers in their collection

Census records

Census records from 1841 to 1911 are available online. For access, see England Census Records and Indexes Online. Census records from 1841 to 1891 are also available on film through a Family History Center or at the Family History Library. The first film number is 306936.


Poor Law Unions

Lancaster Poor Law Union,Lancashire

Probate records

Records of wills, administrations, inventories, indexes, etc. were filed by the court with jurisdiction over this parish. Go to Lancashire Probate Records to find the name of the court having primary jurisdiction. Scroll down in the article to the section Court Jurisdictions by Parish.

Maps and Gazetteers

Maps are a visual look at the locations in England. Gazetteers contain brief summaries about a place.

Bibliography

  • Anthony New. A Guide to the Abbeys of England And Wales, pp. 116–117. Constable.
  • Houses of Premonstratensian canons: The abbey of Cockersand, A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 2 (1908), pp. 154–59.


References

  1. Lewis, Samuel A.,A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 647-654. Date accessed: 17 September 2013.w.


Web sites