Danelaw Wapentake

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A '''wapentake''' is a geographic division formerly used in [[England]] in those counties in the Danelaw for administrative, judicial and military purposes similar to the Anglo-Saxon [[Hundred (division)|hundred]]. Finally abolished by the 1974 reorganization of local government they had survived into the early modern period as taxation districts and for mobilizing the militia in the Napoleonic wars.<ref>"wapentake" in David Hey (ed.) ''The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History'' (2nd ed., 2008, Oxford University Press; ISBN-13: 9780199532988) published to Oxford Reference Online 2009-2012; eISBN: 9780191735042; accessed 20 Jul 2013.</ref>  
 
A '''wapentake''' is a geographic division formerly used in [[England]] in those counties in the Danelaw for administrative, judicial and military purposes similar to the Anglo-Saxon [[Hundred (division)|hundred]]. Finally abolished by the 1974 reorganization of local government they had survived into the early modern period as taxation districts and for mobilizing the militia in the Napoleonic wars.<ref>"wapentake" in David Hey (ed.) ''The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History'' (2nd ed., 2008, Oxford University Press; ISBN-13: 9780199532988) published to Oxford Reference Online 2009-2012; eISBN: 9780191735042; accessed 20 Jul 2013.</ref>  
  
[[wikipedia|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hundred_%28county_subdivision%29#wapentake|The Hundred and the Wapentake}}
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{{wikipedia|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hundred_%28county_subdivision%29#wapentake|The Hundred and the Wapentake}}  
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== References  ==
 
== References  ==
  

Revision as of 17:16, 20 July 2013

A wapentake is a geographic division formerly used in England in those counties in the Danelaw for administrative, judicial and military purposes similar to the Anglo-Saxon hundred. Finally abolished by the 1974 reorganization of local government they had survived into the early modern period as taxation districts and for mobilizing the militia in the Napoleonic wars.[1]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject: The Hundred and the Wapentake


References

  1. "wapentake" in David Hey (ed.) The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History (2nd ed., 2008, Oxford University Press; ISBN-13: 9780199532988) published to Oxford Reference Online 2009-2012; eISBN: 9780191735042; accessed 20 Jul 2013.