Denver and Rio Grande Railroad

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Settlers were attracted to nearby communities because the railroads provided access to markets. Railroads encouraged settlement along their routes to help increase the need for their service. If an ancestor settled near a railroad, you may be able to trace their place of origin back to another place along the tracks. For the D and RGW, this list also shows communities that had important mines.<br>  
 
Settlers were attracted to nearby communities because the railroads provided access to markets. Railroads encouraged settlement along their routes to help increase the need for their service. If an ancestor settled near a railroad, you may be able to trace their place of origin back to another place along the tracks. For the D and RGW, this list also shows communities that had important mines.<br>  
  
=== Depots and Stations (Partial List)  ===
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=== Depots and Stations (Partial List) <ref>Wikipedia contributors, "List of Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad lines" in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Denver_and_Rio_Grande_Western_Railroad_lines(accessed 11 February 2014).</ref> ===
 
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===== '''Colorado'''  =====
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== Record Locations  ==
 
== Record Locations  ==
  

Revision as of 05:34, 16 February 2014

United States  Gotoarrow-kelly.png  Migration  Gotoarrow-kelly.png  Railroads  Gotoarrow-kelly.png  Denver and Rio Grande Railroad

File:Denver and Rio Grande RR in Royal Gorge.jpg
The Denver and Rio Grande Railroad operated from 1870 to 1988 and was principally a transcontinental bridge between Denver and Salt Lake City, and also extended into New Mexico. The rail line carried much of the coal and minerals of the region. In 1988 as part of a purchase, it merged with the Southern Pacific. Today, most former D and RGW main lines are owned and operated by the Union Pacific Railroad.



File:Denver and Rio Grande Western System Map.PNG

Route map for the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad

Contents

Settlers and Stations

Settlers were attracted to nearby communities because the railroads provided access to markets. Railroads encouraged settlement along their routes to help increase the need for their service. If an ancestor settled near a railroad, you may be able to trace their place of origin back to another place along the tracks. For the D and RGW, this list also shows communities that had important mines.

Depots and Stations (Partial List) [1]

Colorado

Denver
Alamo
Alamosa
Anthracite
Antonito
Aspen
Baldwin
Blende
Bond
Boncarbo
Calumet
Canon City
Capers
Carbon Junction
Castle Rock
Castleton
Coal Creek
Colorado Springs
Craig
Creede
Crested Butte
Cuchara Junction
Delta
Dotsero
Douglas
Durango
Engleville
Englewood
Energy
Florence
Fort Logan
Gato
Glenwood Springs
Grand Junction
Gunnison
Hathaway
Hitchens
Ibex
Kubler
La Veta
Lake City
Leadville
Lehigh
Mayne
Mesa Verde
Minnequa
Monson
Montrose
Mustang
Newcomb
Oak Creek
Ojo
Oliver
Orestod
Orient
Ouray
Manitou
Pagosa Springs
Pandora
Parkdale
Parlin
Pictou
Pueblo
Quartz
Rouse
Salida
Sapinero
Silverton
Somerset
Tropic
Vasquez
Villa Grove
Walsenburg
Winter Park

New Mexico

Santa Fe
Chama
Farmington
Gallinas
La Madera
Lumberton
Taos Junction
Tierra Amarilla


Utah

Salt Lake City
Ogden
Soldier Summit


Record Locations

The principal repository for the records of the D and RGW is History Colorado, formerly called the Colorado Historical Society. Other repositories that have some records about this rail line are the Utah State Historical Society, the Pikes Peak library, Colorado College, and Fort Lewis College.

Colorado Historical Records

History Colorado’s holdings for the D and RGW include a manuscript collection, a photography collection, artifacts, and maps.

Manuscripts

The manuscript collection, MSS 513, is probably the most substantial at about 195 linear feet in size. The finding aid for this collection is available on their website at http://www.historycolorado.org/researchers/manuscript-finding-aids. This finding aid describes the contents of the collection folder by folder. The majority of the collection is financial and legal records, but it also includes some personnel information, promotion, and other types of materials. The personnel records do not include records for each year, and several of the rosters will only list agents, bosses, and supervisors rather than a full roster of all employees.

Photographs

The inventory for their photography collection is available online at http://www.historycolorado.org/researchers/drg-photographs. The photographs themselves are available to view in person at the History Colorado library; the photographs have not yet been digitized.

History Colorado has some plat maps attributed to the railroad, but this is not comprehensive collection of settlements near D and RG depots. To find these maps, search the library catalog, online at http://www.historycolorado.org/researchers/library-catalog. To cut right to the D and RG maps, try a Subject search for the term "Denver and Rio Grande Railway Company--Maps." There may also be maps included within the manuscript collection, and those will be noted on the manuscript finding aid.

Maps

History Colorado has some plat maps attributed to the railroad, but this is not a comprehensive collection of settlements near D and RG depots. To find these maps, search the library catalog, online at http://www.historycolorado.org/researchers/library-catalog. To go directly to the D and RG maps, try a Subject search for the term "Denver and Rio Grande Railway Company--Maps." There may also be maps included within the manuscript collection, and those will be noted on the manuscript finding aid.


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