Dominican Republic Civil Registration (FamilySearch Historical Records)

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== Title in the Language of the Records  ==
 
== Title in the Language of the Records  ==
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For a list of records by date or locality currently published in this collection, select the [https://familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/collection/1475794/waypoints Browse] link from the collection landing page  
 
For a list of records by date or locality currently published in this collection, select the [https://familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/collection/1475794/waypoints Browse] link from the collection landing page  
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With the adoption of the Napoleonic civil code of 1804, the Dominican Republic began the practice of civil registration, creating the offices of the civil state (oficialías del estado civil) in charge of registering the events of birth, marriage, and death in the life of its citizens. However, only some civil registration books dating back to 1823 have been found in the Bayaguana Civil Registry (Oficialía del Estado Civil de Bayaguana). Before that time, the Dominican Republic was under Haitian dominion. It wasn’t until June of 1944 that the National Congress created civil registration law 659, which provided new regulations for the functionality of the civil registration institution. One of the regulations was the creation of the Central Office of the Civil State (Oficina Central del Estado Civil), with civil registration headquarters in the capital city and one or more offices in each municipality. The registration of civil records was to be made in duplicate, and one of the original registers was to be sent annually to the Central Office for preservation. The civil records in this collection cover several municipalities (municipios) throughout the country and may include approximately 370,000 names. The birth of a child must be registered within 30 days of the birth. After that, it is considered a late registration and has penalties. However, to avoid the penalties, many children were not registered.
  
 
=== Citation for This Collection  ===
 
=== Citation for This Collection  ===
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The registration of birth, marriage, and death are a great source for extracting important genealogical information such as: dates, places, given names and surnames, residence of the parents, and sometimes the residences of the grandparents. Witnesses often were relatives of the parents. In order to find a record, it is necessary to know the name and year of the event of an ancestor. It is recommended to first search for the name in the corresponding register’s index.  
 
The registration of birth, marriage, and death are a great source for extracting important genealogical information such as: dates, places, given names and surnames, residence of the parents, and sometimes the residences of the grandparents. Witnesses often were relatives of the parents. In order to find a record, it is necessary to know the name and year of the event of an ancestor. It is recommended to first search for the name in the corresponding register’s index.  
 
== Record History  ==
 
 
With the adoption of the Napoleonic civil code of 1804, the Dominican Republic began the practice of civil registration, creating the offices of the civil state (oficialías del estado civil) in charge of registering the events of birth, marriage, and death in the life of its citizens. However, only some civil registration books dating back to 1823 have been found in the Bayaguana Civil Registry (Oficialía del Estado Civil de Bayaguana). Before that time, the Dominican Republic was under Haitian dominion. It wasn’t until June of 1944 that the National Congress created civil registration law 659, which provided new regulations for the functionality of the civil registration institution. One of the regulations was the creation of the Central Office of the Civil State (Oficina Central del Estado Civil), with civil registration headquarters in the capital city and one or more offices in each municipality. The registration of civil records was to be made in duplicate, and one of the original registers was to be sent annually to the Central Office for preservation. The civil records in this collection cover several municipalities (municipios) throughout the country and may include approximately 370,000 names. The birth of a child must be registered within 30 days of the birth. After that, it is considered a late registration and has penalties. However, to avoid the penalties, many children were not registered.
 
  
 
=== Why the Record Was Created  ===
 
=== Why the Record Was Created  ===

Revision as of 19:07, 30 April 2012

FamilySearch Record Search This article describes a collection of historical records available at FamilySearch.org.

Contents

Title in the Language of the Records

Registro Civil de la República Dominicana

Collection Time Period

This collection of the civil registration from the Dominican Republic covers the years 1801 to 2006.

Record Description

The records are written both in narrative style and in formatted records. Some records appear damaged; however, genealogical information may still be extracted.

For a list of records by date or locality currently published in this collection, select the Browse link from the collection landing page

With the adoption of the Napoleonic civil code of 1804, the Dominican Republic began the practice of civil registration, creating the offices of the civil state (oficialías del estado civil) in charge of registering the events of birth, marriage, and death in the life of its citizens. However, only some civil registration books dating back to 1823 have been found in the Bayaguana Civil Registry (Oficialía del Estado Civil de Bayaguana). Before that time, the Dominican Republic was under Haitian dominion. It wasn’t until June of 1944 that the National Congress created civil registration law 659, which provided new regulations for the functionality of the civil registration institution. One of the regulations was the creation of the Central Office of the Civil State (Oficina Central del Estado Civil), with civil registration headquarters in the capital city and one or more offices in each municipality. The registration of civil records was to be made in duplicate, and one of the original registers was to be sent annually to the Central Office for preservation. The civil records in this collection cover several municipalities (municipios) throughout the country and may include approximately 370,000 names. The birth of a child must be registered within 30 days of the birth. After that, it is considered a late registration and has penalties. However, to avoid the penalties, many children were not registered.

Citation for This Collection

The following citation refers to the original source of the data and images published on FamilySearch.org Historical Records. It may include the author, custodian, publisher and archive for the original records.

Genealogical Society of Utah. "Dominican Republic Civil Registration." National Archive, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. FHL microfilms. Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Information about creating source citations for FamilySearch Historical Collections is listed in the wiki article Help:How to Create Source Citations For FamilySearch Historical Records Collections.

Record Content

The key genealogical facts found in most birth records are:

  • Date and time of registration
  • Place of registration
  • Witnesses’ names
  • Name of the registrant
  • Date and time of birth
  • Name of the child
  • Child’s legitimacy
  • Parents’ names
  • Parents’ occupations and residence
  • Sometimes the names of the grandparents

The key genealogical facts found in most marriage records are:

  • Place and date of registration
  • Registrant names (in this case the couple)
  • Groom’s age, marital status, and occupation
  • Groom’s legitimacy and parents' names
  • Bride’s age and marital status
  • Bride’s legitimacy and parents' names
  • Residence of parents
  • Witnesses’ names
  • Witnesses’ age, marital status, and occupation
  • Date of the betrothal promise
  • Marriage date

The key genealogical facts found in most death records are:

  • Place of registration
  • Date of registration
  • Time of registration
  • Registrant name
  • Registrant’s age, marital status, occupation, origin, and residence
  • Date, time, and place of death
  • Deceased name
  • Deceased age, marital status, and legitimacy
  • Deceased parents
  • Parents' origin and residence
  • Cause of death
  • Witnesses' names

How to Use the Records

The registration of birth, marriage, and death are a great source for extracting important genealogical information such as: dates, places, given names and surnames, residence of the parents, and sometimes the residences of the grandparents. Witnesses often were relatives of the parents. In order to find a record, it is necessary to know the name and year of the event of an ancestor. It is recommended to first search for the name in the corresponding register’s index.

Why the Record Was Created

Each civil registrar (Oficial del Estado Civil) is required to keep a duplicate registry of the original records of birth, marriage, divorce, and death. At the end of each year, the original registry, together with its corresponding index book, is sent to the Central Office of the Civil State. These civil registrations allow people to be identified as citizens and therefore able to receive governmental benefits in the future.

Record Reliability

The civil registration in the Dominican Republic is considered a great and reliable source for genealogical research.

Known Issues with This Collection

Important.png Problems with this collection?
See a list of known issues, workarounds, tips, restrictions, future fixes, news and other helpful information.

For a full list of all known issues associated with this collection see the attached Wiki article. If you encounter additional problems, please email them to support@familysearch.org. Please include the full path to the link and a description of the problem in your e-mail. Your assistance will help ensure that future reworks will be considered.

Related Websites

Dominican Republic Genealogy GenWeb Project

Related Wiki Articles

Dominican Republic

Contributions to This Article

We welcome user additions to FamilySearch Historical Records wiki articles. Guidelines are available to help you make changes. Thank you for any contributions you may provide. If you would like to get more involved join the WikiProject FamilySearch Records.

Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections

When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.

Citation Examples for Records Found in FamilySearch Historical Collections

The following are examples of records found in different collections. Please help us by replacing these examples with a citation for a record you have found in this collection.'

Example for an indexed Collection:

“Delaware Marriage Records,” database and digital images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/: accessed 4 March 2011), William Anderson and Elizabeth Baynard Henry, 1890; citing Delaware, State Marriage Records, no. 859, Delaware Bureau of Archives and Records Management, Dover.

Example for a Browsed Collection:

“Argentina, Buenos Aires, Catholic Church Records, 1635-1981,” digital images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed 28 February 2012), La Plata > San Ponciano > Matrimonios 1884-1886 > image 71 of 389, Artemio Avendano and Clementina Peralta, 1884; citing Parroquia de San Ponciano en la Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Matrimonios. San Ponciano, La Plata.

When the citation has been replaced with a citation specific to the collection described, please change the heading to "Example of a Source Citation for a Record Found in This Collection".

A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections.