Dorchester, Massachusetts

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:#St. Mary's Cemetery, 1851.
 
:#St. Mary's Cemetery, 1851.
 
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== Churches  ==
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The following is a list of churches established in town in order of organization date (if known) and condition of records in the 1889 survey if listed. It is a record of churches up to 1920 only. For a list of churches of Boston in 2000, see the Emmanuel Gospel Center's [http://www.egc.org/sites/egc.org/files/churches/2000BCD_full.pdf Boston Church Directory (Millennium Edition)] or the history of churches at the [http://www.dorchesteratheneum.org/page.php?id=55&expand=1#topics Dorchester Atheneum] website.
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:#First Church (in England, 1630), reorganized / new church First Parish of Dorchester [first Congregational and then Unitarian] (now [http://www.firstparishdorchester.org/ First Parish Church in Dorchester] Unitarian Universalist), 1636, records good.<br>Note: Memorandum in the records reads "Second Church of Dorchester." The fifth building was burned in 1896.<br>First Parish Church in Dorchester Records, 1636-1981, held at the [http://www.masshist.org/findingaids/doc.cfm?fa=fa0041 Massachusetts Historical Society].<br>Church records, 1636-1845, {{FHL|277727|item|disp=FHL film 856696 Item 1}}.<br>Records of the First Church at Dorchester, in New England, 1636-1734 (Boston, 1891), xxvi, 270 pp.<br>Digital versions at [http://archive.org/details/recordsoffirstch00first Internet Archive] and [http://books.google.com/books?id=0-xzW5V-AzoC Google Books].<br>[http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/2104155 WorldCat (Other Libraries)]; {{FHL|179271|item|disp=FHL book 974.46/D1 K2r or film 833385}}.<br>
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:#Church in the South Precinct of Dorchester, 1717.<br>Note: This church became part of Stoughton when it was created as a town in 1736, see [[Stoughton, Massachusetts#Churches|Stoughton]].
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:#Second Congregational Church [split off from the First Church and sometimes called the South Meeting House] (now [http://www.secondchurchnaz.org/ Second Church in Dorchester], a Church of the Nazarene), 1808, records good.<br>Second Church, records, 1922-1987 (gaps), at the [http://www.congregationallibrary.org/sites/all/pdf/efg-dsc.pdf Congregational Library], Boston.<br>Janet L. Robertson, ''Puritan Heritage: A Brief History of Second Church in Dorchester'' (Boston, 1955), [18] pp.<br>[http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/32961595 WorldCat (Other Libraries)]; Not at FHL.
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:#Third Religious Society in Dorchester [split off from the Second Congregational Church and called the New South Meeting House or Dorchester South Church] (by 1817 Third Congregational Church of Dorchester, now Unitarian), Lower Mills, 1813, records good.<br>Note: Likely not extant today.<br>''Memorial of the Proprietors of the New South Meeting-House in Dorchester'' (Boston, 1813).<br>[http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/15452437 WorldCat (Other Libraries)]; Not at FHL.<br>William Irvin Lawrance, ''History of the Third Religious Society of Dorchester, 1813-1888'' (Boston, 1888).<br>[http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/14250855 WorldCat (Other Libraries)]; Not at FHL.
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== References  ==
 
== References  ==

Revision as of 15:00, 12 September 2012

United States Gotoarrow.png Massachusetts Gotoarrow.png Norfolk Gotoarrow.png Dorchester

Dorchester (1630-1870)

Dorchester was a town in Norfolk County before it was annexed to Boston in Suffolk County. This guide discusses the records created by this town and includes references to material of present-day Dorchester (the neighborhood of Boston) as well. Be careful of the time period you are researching here as the records you need may be in one of two counties or one of two towns.

Contents


Brief History

Members of the Dorchester Company set sail on the Mary and John and arrived at Mattapan in 1630 where all her 140 passengers settled. The place was soon renamed Dorchester. The settlement was granted several large tracts of land that would later become the towns of Milton in 1662 and Stoughton in 1726, but the concentration of the population was always near the shore. Many notable events happened here, including the first town meeting in America in 1633 and the introduction of chocolate in 1765. The town became a place for the Boston Elite to summer in the late nineteenth century and Columbia Point was still a pasture. The town became intertwined with Boston and was annexed in pieces until it was all one with Boston. The first to go was Dorchester Heights in 1804 and then renamed South Boston. The bulk of the town was annexed in 1870 and the remaining parts that became Hyde Park were annexed in 1912. This section of the city is home to the oldest house, the James Blake House in Edward Everett Square, built around 1650.

Historical Data

The basic data is from the "Historical Data" publication series[1] with additions from various sources.

Associated names

Dorchester at one time was called Mattapan, Mennens Moone, and Squantums Neck.

Village or section names include Commercial Point, Dorchester Heights, Dorchester Neck, Harrison Square, Hyde Park, Lower Mills, Meeting House Hill, Neponset, Pine Garden, Port Norfolk, and Upper Mills.

City neighborhoods include Adams Village, Annapolis, Ashmont Hill, Cedar Grove, Clam Point, Codman Hill, Codman Square, Columbia Point, Everett Square, Fields Corner, Five Streets, Four Corners, Franklin Field, Freeport, Harbor Point, Jones Hill, Lower Mills, Mattapan, Meeting House Hill, Melville Park, Mount Bowdoin, Neponset, Peabody Square, Pope's Hill, Port Norfolk, Savin Hill, and Uphams Corner.

Border changes
Dates Events
7 Sept. 1630 The name was changed from Mattapan to Dorchester [Mass. Bay Rec., 1: 75].
4 Mar. 1635 Thompson's Island granted to Dorchester.
28 Mar. 1636 Border between Dorchester and Boston established.
17 May 1638 Border between Dorchester and Dedham established.
2 June 1641 Squantums Neck and Mennens Moone annexed.
12 Nov. 1659 Granted 1000 acres of land.
7 May 1662 Part set off to create the new town of Milton.
22 Dec. 1726 Part set off to create the new town of Stoughton.
1 Aug. 1728 Land belonging to Dorchester annexed to Lunenburg.
7 June 1739 Part of Dedham annexed.
22 Feb. 1792 Part of the section called Squantum and the farms annexed to Quincy.
6 Mar. 1804 Dorchester Heights / Neck annexed to Boston and became known as South Boston.
10 Feb. 1814 Another part of the section called Squantum and the farms annexed to Quincy.
12 Feb. 1819 Part annexed to Quincy.
21 Feb. 1820 Border between Dorchester and Quincy established and another part of Squantum annexed to Quincy.
17 June 1831 Part of Dedham annexed.
25 Mar. 1834 Thompson's Island annexed to Boston.
2 May 1855 The remaining part of Squantum annexed to Quincy.
21 May 1855 Part annexed to Boston.
22 Apr. 1868 Part included in the new town of Hyde Park.
3 Jan. 1870 Dorchester annexed to Boston by act of 4 June 1869 [Mass. Acts 1869, ch. 349, sec. 1, p. 646].
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Town Histories

Works written on the town include:[[Image:
MassachusettsSuffolk CountyNorfolk CountyPlymouth CountyMiddlesex CountyEssex CountyNorfolk CountyBostonChelseaRevereWinthropNeedhamBrooklineDedhamWestwoodNorwoodCantonRandolphBraintreeWeymouthHinghamHullQuincyMiltonNewtonWatertownWalthamLexingtonWoburnWinchesterArlingtonBelmontCambridgeSomervilleMedfordStonehamMelroseMaldenEverettSaugusLynnNanhantCharlestownBrightonRoxburyWest RoxburyDorchesterHyde Park
Dorchester was annexed by Boston in 1870. This shows Dorchester in Boston on a map of Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

]]

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Vital Records

The town's vital records are available in many locations:

Original records
Published records
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City Directories

Dorchester was published in 1848 and 1850 (business only), and 1868/9.

The Library of Congress (Washington, D.C.) has one of the largest collections of city directories in the country. They are likely to own most of the years listed above. Their collection is in microfiche, microfilm, and books, but there is no online inventory of their holdings except for microfilm. See their guide online.

Other holdings:

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Cemeteries

The following is a list of cemeteries within the old borders of the town of Dorchester. For more details regarding these cemeteries, see the state guide under cemeteries for books on the subject.

  1. Cedar Grove Cemetery, 1867.
    Robert Baynard Severy is the author of several books:
    Guide to section 5 Cedar Grove Cemetery, Dorchester, Massachusetts ([Dorchester, Mass.], 2010).
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL.
    Guide to section 6 Cedar Grove Cemetery, Dorchester, Massachusetts ([Dorchester, Mass.], 2009).
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL.
    Guide to section 7 Cedar Grove Cemetery, Dorchester, Massachusetts ([Dorchester, Mass.], 2007).
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL.
    Guide to section 9 Cedar Grove Cemetery, Dorchester, Massachusetts ([Dorchester, Mass.], 2009).
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL.
    Guide to section 10 Cedar Grove Cemetery, Dorchester, Massachusetts ([Dorchester, Mass.], 2010).
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL..
    Guide to section 11 Cedar Grove Cemetery, Dorchester, Massachusetts ([Dorchester, Mass.], 2008).
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL.
    Guide to section 12 Cedar Grove Cemetery, Dorchester, Massachusetts ([Dorchester, Mass.], 2008).
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL.
    Guide to the Oak Hill Section 18 Cedar Grove Cemetery, Dorchester, Massachusetts ([Dorchester, Mass.], 2011).
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL.
    Guide to the Oak Hill Section 19 Cedar Grove Cemetery, Dorchester, Massachusetts ([Dorchester, Mass.], 2012).
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL.
    Guide to the Maple Lot section 21 Cedar Grove Cemetery, Dorchester, Massachusetts ([Dorchester, Mass.], 2007).
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL.
  2. Codman Burial Ground, 1848.
    Manuscript at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston.
    Manuscript at the NSDAR Library.
  3. Dorchester North Cemetery, 1634.
    Daniel Davenport, The Sexton's Monitor, and Dorchester Cemetery Memorial (Roxbury, Mass., 1826; rep. Boston, 1838), x, 38 pp. (for 1826) and 35, [1] pp. (for 1838). [Note: A transcript by the sexton of the inscriptions that are almost worn away together with some of curious note.]
    Digital versions of the 1826 edition at Internet Archive and the Hathi Trust.
    Harlow E. Woodward, Epitaphs from the Old Burying Ground in Dorchester, Massachusetts (Boston Highlands, Mass., 1869), 21 pp. [Note: Not complete]
    Digital versions at Internet Archive and the Hathi Trust.
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL.
    Annual Report of the Cemetery Department for the year 1904-1905 (Boston, 1905), p. 30-266, "Historical Sketch of The First Burying Place in Dorchester [Dorchester North Ground] including town records, records of all tombs, all epitaphs now in ground and of many stones now missing, and record of many of those buried in the ground with no gravestones standing."
    Digital versions at Internet Archive and Google Books.
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL.
  4. Dorchester South Cemetery / South Burying Ground, 1771.
    Manuscript at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston.
  5. St. Mary's Cemetery, 1851.
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Churches

The following is a list of churches established in town in order of organization date (if known) and condition of records in the 1889 survey if listed. It is a record of churches up to 1920 only. For a list of churches of Boston in 2000, see the Emmanuel Gospel Center's Boston Church Directory (Millennium Edition) or the history of churches at the Dorchester Atheneum website.

  1. First Church (in England, 1630), reorganized / new church First Parish of Dorchester [first Congregational and then Unitarian] (now First Parish Church in Dorchester Unitarian Universalist), 1636, records good.
    Note: Memorandum in the records reads "Second Church of Dorchester." The fifth building was burned in 1896.
    First Parish Church in Dorchester Records, 1636-1981, held at the Massachusetts Historical Society.
    Church records, 1636-1845, FHL film 856696 Item 1.
    Records of the First Church at Dorchester, in New England, 1636-1734 (Boston, 1891), xxvi, 270 pp.
    Digital versions at Internet Archive and Google Books.
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); FHL book 974.46/D1 K2r or film 833385.
  2. Church in the South Precinct of Dorchester, 1717.
    Note: This church became part of Stoughton when it was created as a town in 1736, see Stoughton.
  3. Second Congregational Church [split off from the First Church and sometimes called the South Meeting House] (now Second Church in Dorchester, a Church of the Nazarene), 1808, records good.
    Second Church, records, 1922-1987 (gaps), at the Congregational Library, Boston.
    Janet L. Robertson, Puritan Heritage: A Brief History of Second Church in Dorchester (Boston, 1955), [18] pp.
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL.
  4. Third Religious Society in Dorchester [split off from the Second Congregational Church and called the New South Meeting House or Dorchester South Church] (by 1817 Third Congregational Church of Dorchester, now Unitarian), Lower Mills, 1813, records good.
    Note: Likely not extant today.
    Memorial of the Proprietors of the New South Meeting-House in Dorchester (Boston, 1813).
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL.
    William Irvin Lawrance, History of the Third Religious Society of Dorchester, 1813-1888 (Boston, 1888).
    WorldCat (Other Libraries); Not at FHL.


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References

  1. William Francis Galvin, Historical Data Relating to Counties, Cities and Towns in Massachusetts (Boston, new ed., 1997), 40-41. WorldCat (Other Libraries); FHL book 974.4 H2h 1997

Adjacent towns: Suffolk Co.: Boston | Hyde Park | Roxbury | West Roxbury | Norfolk Co.: Milton | Quincy | Plymouth Co.: Hull