Duchesne Stake, Utah LDS Church Wards and BranchesEdit This Page

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Utah Church Records go to Duchesne County Church Records go to Duchesne Stake, Utah LDS Church Wards and Branches

This page includes the boundaries of wards and branches around 1930's, a timeline history, and how to obtain the records.

Source for this page: Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941).

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Contents

Duchesne Stake

Stake boundaries as of about 1930
See Encyclopedic History..., p. 199-200.[1]

  • Area of the County: West
  • Headquarters in: Mount Emmons
  • Boundaries of stake: Duchesne Stake of Zion consists of Latter-day Saints residing in the west part of Duchesne County, Utah, extending north to the summit of the Uintah Mountains, east to the Roosevelt Stake, south to the so-called Bad Land Cliffs, and west to the boundary line between Duchesne and Wasatch counties.


History Timeline up to about 1930

  • 1905 - Most of the country now included in the Duchesne Stake constituted a part of the Uintah Indian Reservation until 1905.
  • 1910 - The stake conference held at Vernal, Sept. 14, 1910, the Uintah Stake was divided and the west part, or the Indian Reservation, was organized as the Duchesne Stake.
  • 1910 - At the time of its organization the Duchesne Stake consisted of the following bishop’s wards and branches: Boneta, Hayden, Roosevelt, Tabiona and Theodore.
  • 1920 - At a stake conference held June 27, 1920, the Duchesne Stake of Zion was divided and the eastern part of the same, containing Alterra, Bennett, Cedar View, Hayden, Ioka, Myton, Neola, Randlett and Roosevelt, were organized as the Roosevelt Stake of Zion.
  • 1920 - The wards of Altonah, Arcadia, Bluebell, Boneta, Duchesne, Midview, Mount Emmons, Mountain Home, Redcliff, Strawberry, Tabiona, Talmage, Upalco and Utahn were retained in the Duchesne Stake.
  • 1920 - In the organization of the new stake the northern, western, and southern stake lines remained the same as before, but the east line running north and south separating the Duchesne Stake from the Roosevelt Stake was established at the so-called Dry Gulch, about five miles east of Bluebell Ward, part of the way running southeast toward Lake Fork River. In the south part of the stake the east boundary line follows the course of Lake Fork River until the point where that river empties into the Duchesne River, thence the boundary line runs due south until it connects with the southern line running east and west.

This timeline (arranged by year) includes events that affected records, record-keeping, and movements of Mormons in this area.


Other History Resources
Many wards or branches appointed members to compile a history. Copies may be in the ward library or in homes of members. Some contain biographical sketches of members of the ward at the time of compilation.

Obtain the Records


Wards and Branches

Altonah, Arcadia, Bluebell, Boneta, Duchesne, Midview, Mount Emmons, Mountain Home, Redcliff, Strawberry, Tabiona, Talmage and Upalco.

Altonah Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 18.[2]

Boundaries:

Altonah Ward, Duchesne Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of Latter-day Saints residing in the upper part of what is generally called the Bluebell country, lying east of Lake Fork Creek. The center of the ward, or the townsite of Altonah, is situated at an elevation of 6,700 feet above sea level, six miles east (across Lake Fork) of Mountain Home, three miles east of Lake Fork, 32 miles northeast of Fort Duchesne, 24 miles northwest of Roosevelt and Myton, and 24 miles northeast of Duchesne City.

History timeline

  • 1906 - Settlements commenced in 1906 on Uintah Indian Reservation.
  • 1907 - Other settlers followed in 1907 and 1908.
  • 1912 - Jan. 28, 1912, a branch of the Bluebell Ward was organized named Altonah.
  • 1915 - April 23, 1915, the Altonah and West Bluebell branches were organized into a ward named Altonah.
  • 1916 - Altonah Ward was divided Sept. 10, 1916, and the south part of the same organized as the Mount Emmons Ward.


Obtain the Records


Arcadia Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 27.[3]

Boundaries:

Arcadia Ward, Duchesne Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of Latter-day Saints residing in a farming district, being a part of an extensive country lying between Lake Fork on the east and Blue Bench on the west. The center of the ward, or the surveyed townsite, containing 40 acres surveyed into 9 four-acre blocks, is six miles northwest of Midview, four miles by nearest road south of Upalco, 10 miles northwest of Myton, 14 miles northeast of Duchesne, and 10 miles southeast of Mount Emmons.

History timeline

  • 1907 - Settlers settled into a new part of Uintah Basin. Other settlers arrived in 1908 and 1909.
  • 1910 - These early settlers of Arcadia became identified with the Midview Branch which was organized July 10, 1910.
  • 1914 - When the Midview Branch was organized as a ward, Feb. 15, 1914, the north end of the same was organized as a branch of the Church called North Midview.

1917 - On Sept. 14, 1917, the North Midview Branch was organized as a ward.

  • 1917 - A post office had been established in this part of the Uintah Reservation called Redcap Postoffice, but which was changed to Arcadia when the ward was organized.


Obtain the Records


Bluebell Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 73.[4]

Boundaries:
Bluebell Ward, of Duchesne Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in a tract of country lying east of Lake Fork and west of Dry Gulch Creek. The center of the ward, or the townsite of Bluebell, is situated in a beautiful locality surrounded by cedar-covered ridges, four miles east of Mt. Emmons, 16 miles northeast of Roosevelt, and 23 miles northeast of Duchesne City; it is only four miles south of the foothills of the Uintah Range.


History timeline

  • 1907 - Bluebell was first settled, named after the Bluebell flowers.
  • 1910 - A townsite was selected in 1910, which was surveyed two years later.
  • 1911 - On Feb. 12, 1911, the saints in the Bluebell country were organized as a branch of the Boneta Ward.
  • 1911 - This branch was organized into a regular bishop’s ward Dec. 3, 1911.

Obtain the Records


Boneta Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 77-78.[5]

Boundaries:

BONETA WARD, Duchesne Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in a farming district lying west of Lake Fork. The center of the ward is the Boneta townsite, which is 15 miles northeast of Duchesne City, 1 1/2 miles west of Lake Fork, five miles southeast of Mountain Home, and four miles west of Mount Emmons.

History timeline

  • 1905 - The Uintah Indian Reservation was thrown open for settlement in August, 1905, a number of whites, most of them Latter-day Saints, filed on land (homesteads) in that tract of country now known as Boneta.
  • 1906 - The settlement was founded in 1906.
  • 1907 - A post office was established in 1907 named Boneta.
  • 1910 - Up to that time the whole section of country including the later Boneta, Talmage, Mountain Home, Altera, Bluebell, Mount Emmons and Upalco wards was called Lake Fork. On Dec. 2, 1910.
  • 1910 - The saints residing on and near Lake Fork, north of the rim of the Blue Bench, were organized as a ward called Boneta, which means “pretty” in Spanish.

Obtain the Records


Duchesne Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 200.[6]

Boundaries:

DUCHESNE WARD, Duchesne Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of Latter-day Saints residing in and near the city of Duchesne, the seat of Duchesne County, situated at the junction of Strawberry Creek with the Duchesne River, 25 miles southwest of Roosevelt, 50 miles southwest of Vernal, Uintah Co., and 60 miles southeast of Heber City.

History timeline

  • 1905 - The first branch of the Church on the Uintah Indian Reservation was called the Duchesne Branch of the Wasatch Stake. It was organized Nov. 30, 1905.
  • 1906 - June 6, 1906, and the Duchesne Branch was made part of the Uintah Stake.
  • 1906 - On Sept. 3, 1906, the Duchesne Branch was organized as a ward. In 1906 the saints at Theodore were organized as a branch of the Duchesne Ward.
  • 1907 - Aug. 27, 1907, the Duchesne Ward, which hitherto had contained all the saints in Duchesne County, or in that part of the country which had recently constituted the Uintah Indian Reservation, was divided, and a part of the same (the Theodore Branch) was organized as the Theodore Ward.
  • 1907 - Soon after the above statement, (no date given) the east part of Duchesne Ward temporarily continued as the Duchesne Ward, Soon afterwards the Duchesne Ward was named Roosevelt and the Theodore Ward named Duchesne Ward.


Obtain the Records


Midview Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 499-500.[7]

Boundaries:

Midview Ward, Duchesne Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in a farming district known as Midview, thus named because of being located about midway between Lake Fork and the Duchesne River. The center of the ward, or the townsite of Midview, is situated one mile north of the Duchesne River and three miles south of Lake Fork, about six miles in a straight line or eight miles by road west of Myton, and 15 miles northeast of Duchesne.


History timeline

  • 1905 - That part of the country now included in Midview was settled in 1905 soon after the Uintah Indian Reservation was opened for settlement.
  • 1906 - A Sunday school was organized at Midview in 1906.
  • 1910 - The Midview district were organized July 20, 1910, as a branch of the Church.
  • 1913 - The Midview Branch was organized as a ward, Sept. 21, 1913.


Obtain the Records


Mount Emmons Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 544-545.[8]

Boundaries:
Mount Emmons Ward, Duchesne Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in a farming district known by the local name of Mount Emmons, thus named after one of the highest peaks in the Uintah Range of Mountains, which mountain peak stands forth in bold view about 30 miles due north of the Mt. Emmons townsite. Mount Emmons is six miles south of Altonah, six miles east of Boneta, 20 miles northwest of Roosevelt, and 20 miles northeast of Duchesne city. It is also two miles east of Lake Fork and about 12 miles south of the foot of the Uintah Mountains. The townsite is located on an extensive flat known as the Altonah Bench, which extends north and south, east of the Lake Fork, for about 16 miles.

History timeline

  • 1906 - Mt. Emmons, formerly known as West Bluebell, was first settled in 1906.
  • 1913 - The saints in that locality were organized as a branch of the Bluebell Ward April 27, 1913.
  • 1916 - The West Bluebell Branch was organized as a ward Sept. 17, 1916. When the Altonah Ward was organized, West Bluebell became a branch of that ward.

Obtain the Records


Mountain Home Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 552.[9]

Boundaries:

MOUNTAIN HOME WARD, Duchesne Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing on a tract of farming country lying near the base of the Uintah Mountains. The center of the ward, or the townsite of Mountain Home, is two miles west of Lake Fork, five miles northwest of Boneta, five miles west of Altonah, 20 miles northwest of Roosevelt, and 20 miles north of Duchesne.

History timeline

  • 1908 - Settlers began settling in that parto of the country. They lived in tents and wagons while a land surgey was in process.
  • 1913 - The first saints in Mountain Home belonged to the Boneta Ward, which ward was divided Sept. 21, 1913.
  • 1913 - The north part of the same Bonita Ward was organized as the Mountain Home Ward, Sept. 21, 1913.


Obtain the Records


Redcliff Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 693-694.[10]

Boundaries:

Redcliff Ward, Duchesne Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in a fine little valley lying along the Duchesne River, about three miles long from northwest to southeast. The red sand cliffs in the south end of the valley suggested the name of the settlement, though the post office name is Hanna, thus named after William P. Hanna, one of the first non-Mormon settlers in that part of the country.

The Redcliff Ward meeting house is nine miles by nearest road northwest of Tabiona, 38 miles northwest of Duchesne, and 35 miles southeast of Kamas (across the mountains) in Summit County, Utah.

History timeline

  • 1905 - The first settlers belonged to the Tabiona Branch.
  • 1907 - First crop raised.
  • 1911 - First School house built.
  • 1918 - June 30, 1918, was when the Stockmore Branch was organized as the Redcliff Ward.

Obtain the Records


Strawberry Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 840.[11]

Boundaries:

STRAWBERRY WARD, Duchesne Stake, Duchesne County, Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints living scattered along Strawberry Creek, including a little settlement situated in the open valley at the foot of Tabby Mountain. The Strawberry Ward extends up and down Strawberry Creek many miles, partly at a place known as Fruitland. The Strawberry school house, which may be considered the center of the ward, stands on Strawberry Creek, five miles southwest of Duchesne, on the road leading from Duchesne to Heber City.


History timeline

  • 1905 - Homesteaders arrived and claimed land under the Homestead Law.
  • 1908 - A Sunday school was organized Aug. 12, 1908.
  • 1914 - On Nov. 8, 1914, the saints who had settled on Strawberry Creek and vicinity were organized as the Strawberry Branch of the Duchesne Ward.
  • 1918 - June 30, 1918, the Strawberry Branch was organized as the Strawberry Ward.

Obtain the Records


Tabiona Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 860.[12]

Boundaries:

TABIONA WARD, Duchesne Stake, Duchesne Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing on the upper Duchesne River, mostly in a little valley (one of the most beautiful in the Uintah Basin) extending from southwest to northeast along the river.

The valley is about ten miles long, with an average width of two miles. The Tabiona townsite is situated on the east side of the river, ten miles southeast of Redcliff, 27 miles northwest of Duchesne, and 45 miles by mountain road southeast of Kamas, Summit Co., Utah. About one-half of the people reside on the Tabiona townsite, and the other half live scattered on their respective farms, strung out on the east side of the river.

History timeline

  • 1905 - Settlers arrived and immediately built cabins in that part of the country now included in Tabiona Ward.
  • 1906 - The actual settlement of Tabiona took place in the spring of 1906.
  • 1906 - A townsite was surveyed on lands which had formerly been owned by the Indian Chief Tabby, and in his honor the place was named Tabbyville, afterwards changed to Tabiona.
  • 1910 - A branch of the Church was organized at Tabbyville July 24, 1910.
  • 1911 - This branch was organized as a regular bishop’s ward Dec. 10, 1911.


Obtain the Records


Talmage Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 861.[13]

Boundaries:

History timeline

Obtain the Records


Upalco Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 901.[14]

Boundaries:

History timeline

Obtain the Records

References

  1. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 199-200.
  2. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 18.
  3. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 27.
  4. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 73.
  5. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 77-78.
  6. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 200.
  7. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 499-500.
  8. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 544-545.
  9. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 552.
  10. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 693-694.
  11. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 840.
  12. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 860.
  13. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 861.
  14. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 901.

 

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