Dutch Reformed Church in the United States

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The Dutch Reformed Church started in the United States in 1628. The first meeting was in New Amsterdam, New Netherlands (now known as New York City, New York).  In 1819, it was known as the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church. It's current name is Reformed Church in America.  
 
The Dutch Reformed Church started in the United States in 1628. The first meeting was in New Amsterdam, New Netherlands (now known as New York City, New York).  In 1819, it was known as the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church. It's current name is Reformed Church in America.  
  
Services were held in Dutch until 1764, although in the mid 19th century there was a revival of using Dutch only as more Netherland immigrants came to the U.S.
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Services were held in Dutch until 1764, although in the mid 19th century there was a revival of using Dutch instead of English as more Netherland immigrants came to the U.S.  
  
For more on the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reformed_Church_in_America history of the Dutch Reformed Church.]
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For more on the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reformed_Church_in_America history of the Dutch Reformed Church.]  
  
 
For a list of [http://images.rca.org/docs/archives/chronocongregations.pdf known congregations of the Dutch Reformed Church from 1628 to 2000.]
 
For a list of [http://images.rca.org/docs/archives/chronocongregations.pdf known congregations of the Dutch Reformed Church from 1628 to 2000.]
  
 
=== Dutch Reformed Records  ===
 
=== Dutch Reformed Records  ===

Revision as of 21:42, 15 September 2010

History in the United States

The Dutch Reformed Church started in the United States in 1628. The first meeting was in New Amsterdam, New Netherlands (now known as New York City, New York).  In 1819, it was known as the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church. It's current name is Reformed Church in America.

Services were held in Dutch until 1764, although in the mid 19th century there was a revival of using Dutch instead of English as more Netherland immigrants came to the U.S.

For more on the history of the Dutch Reformed Church.

For a list of known congregations of the Dutch Reformed Church from 1628 to 2000.

Dutch Reformed Records