Emery Stake, Utah LDS Church Wards and Branches

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Huntington Ward, Emery Stake, Emery Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in the city of Huntington and surrounding country—a farming community. Huntington is the largest ward in the Emery Stake. The town is situated on Huntington Creek, about three miles east of the base of the Wasatch Mountains, ten miles north of Castle Dale, the headquarters of the stake, and 22 miles southwest of Price.
  
 
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*1878 - Huntington is one of the original towns founded by the Latter-day Saints in Castle Valley, and dates back to 1878.
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*1879 - On Oct. 7, 1879, the saints at Huntington were organized as a ward.
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'''Obtain the Records'''  
 
'''Obtain the Records'''  

Revision as of 20:08, 25 January 2013

Utah Church Records go to [Emery County, Utah#Churches_and_Religious_Groups|Emery County Church Records]] go to Emery Stake, Utah LDS Church Wards and Branches

This page includes the boundaries of wards and branches around 1930's, a timeline history, and how to obtain the records.

Source for this page: Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 226-227.

  • Online through BYU Books. (Free) In the Text search box, type the town or unit name and click Go. Select page numbers (tiny) at the right to see the page.
  • Also available through Ancestry.com ($).

Contents

Emery Stake

Stake boundaries as of about 1930
See Encyclopedic History..., p.226-227..[1]

  • Area of the County:
  • Headquarters in: Castle Dale, UT
  • Boundaries of stake:

Emery Stake of Zion consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in Emery Co., Utah, (except the town of Green River, which belongs to the Carbon Stake ecclesiastically).

History Timeline up to about 1930

  • 1877 - In 1877, 1878 and 1879, steps were taken to locate settlements in Castle Valley, according to advice from the General Authorities of the Church.
  • 1882 - The stake was fully organized in 1882.
  • 1890 - Emery Stake Academy, Castle Dale, Emery Co., Utah, was founded in
  • 1910 - In 1910 (May 8) the Emery Stake was divided and its northern part organized as the Carbon Stake of Zion, while the south part of the Emery Stake was continued under the old name.
  • 1930 - At the close of 1930 the Emery Stake consisted of nine organized bishop’s wards and three independent branches.
  • Castle Valley, which includes the best part of Emery County, became well known to the people of Sanpete County and other localities through expeditions which were sent to fight Indians during the Black Hawk War in 1865–1867.

This timeline (arranged by year) includes events that affected records, record-keeping, and movements of Mormons in this area.


Other History Resources
Many wards or branches appointed members to compile a history. Copies may be in the ward library or in homes of members. Some contain biographical sketches of members of the ward at the time of compilation.

Obtain the Records

Wards and Branches

Castle Dale, Clawson, Cleveland, Elmo, Emery,Ferron, Huntington, Lawrence Branch, Mohrland Branch, Orangeville, Rochester Branch, Victor.

Castle Dale Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 120-121.[2]

Boundaries:

Castle Dale Ward, Emery Stake, Emery Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing within the limits of Castle Dale Precinct, including the town of Castle Dale, which is pleasantly situated on Cottonwood Creek.


History timeline

  • 1877 - Castle Dale was settled in 1877 by a few L. D. S. families.
  • 1879 - Castle Dale saints were organized as a ward Oct. 7, 1879.

Obtain the Records


Clawson Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 144.[3]

Boundaries:

CLAWSON WARD, Emery Stake, Emery Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in the village of Clawson, situated on the main road leading from Castle Dale to Ferron, and is a farming district. The village is 3 1/2 miles northeast of Ferron, and 7 1/2 miles southwest of Castle Dale.

History timeline

  • 1889 - That year the saints at Kingsville were organized as a branch of the Ferron Ward and named Clawson.
  • 1895 - Clawson Ward is an outgrowth of Ferron, but commencement was made for a settlement as early as 1895, when the locality was known as North Flat.
  • 1902 - The saints at Kingsville were organized as a branch of the Ferron Ward and named Clawson.
  • 1904 - This branch was organized as the Clawson Ward Oct. 25, 1904.

Obtain the Records

Cleveland Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 147.[4]

Boundaries:

Cleveland, Emery Stake, Emery Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in the little town of Cleveland and surroundings—a farming community. The village of Cleveland is six miles northeast of Huntington, and 15 miles northeast of Castle Dale.

History timeline

  • 1855 - Cleveland is an outgrowth of Huntington and dates back as a settlement to 1885.
  • 1890 - The saints were organized as a ward Aug. 12, 1890.

Obtain the Records

Elmo Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 221.[5]

Boundaries:

Elmo Ward, Emery Stake, Emery Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing on or near the so-called Washboard Flat in Castle Valley. The center of the ward occupies elevated ground four miles northeast of Cleveland, 11 miles northeast of Huntington and 15 miles south of Price, the nearest station on the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad.

History timeline

  • 1911 - The saints built a school house in 1909–1910, and in 1911 bought the old Cleveland school house, and moved it to Elmo, where they rebuilt it as a meeting house.
  • 1912 - On June 16, 1912, the saints at Elmo were organized as a branch of the Church.
  • 1913 - This branch was organized as a regular bishop’s ward May 10, 1913.


Obtain the Records

Emery Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 228.[6]

Boundaries:

EMERY WARD, of Emery Stake, Emery Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in the village of Emery and vicinity. The village of Emery is situated on a level tract of land 15 miles southwest of Ferron and 27 miles southwest of Castle Dale. It is also 60 miles southwest of Price, the nearest railroad station, and about 184 miles southeast of Salt Lake City.

History timeline

  • 1881 - Emery as a settlement dates back to May, 1881.
  • 1883 - Sept. 2,1883, the saints on the Muddy were organized as the Emery Ward.

Obtain the Records

Ferron Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 248-249.[7]

Boundaries:
Ferron Ward, Emery Stake, Emery Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing on Upper Ferron Creek, including the town of Ferron and a few scattered settlers living in the neighborhood. The town is situated on rising ground on Ferron Creek, about 2 1/2 miles east of the mouth of the canyon through which the creek enters Castle Valley, 11 1/2 miles southwest of Castle Dale.

History timeline

  • 1877 - is one of the original L. D. S. settlements in Castle Valley founded by saints from Sanpete County late in 1877.
  • 1879 - Oct, 9, 1879, these saints were organized into a regular bishop’s ward.

Obtain the Records

Huntington Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 347.[8]

Boundaries:

Huntington Ward, Emery Stake, Emery Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in the city of Huntington and surrounding country—a farming community. Huntington is the largest ward in the Emery Stake. The town is situated on Huntington Creek, about three miles east of the base of the Wasatch Mountains, ten miles north of Castle Dale, the headquarters of the stake, and 22 miles southwest of Price.

History timeline

  • 1878 - Huntington is one of the original towns founded by the Latter-day Saints in Castle Valley, and dates back to 1878.
  • 1879 - On Oct. 7, 1879, the saints at Huntington were organized as a ward.


Obtain the Records

Lawrence Branch

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 419.[9]

Boundaries:

History timeline

Obtain the Records

Mohrland Branch

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 523.[10]

Boundaries:

History timeline

Obtain the Records

Orangeville Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 620-621.[11]

Boundaries:

History timeline

Obtain the Records

Rochester Branch

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 714-715.[12]

Boundaries:

History timeline

Obtain the Records

Victor Ward

See Encyclopedic History..., p. 914.[13]

Boundaries:

History timeline

Obtain the Records

References

  1. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p.226-227.
  2. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p.120-121.
  3. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 144.
  4. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 147.
  5. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 221.
  6. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 228.
  7. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 248-249.
  8. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 347.
  9. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 419.
  10. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 523.
  11. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 620-621.
  12. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p.714-715.
  13. Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church. (Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1941). p. 914.