England Cheshire Non-Conformist Church Records (FamilySearch Historical Records)

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{{Record Search article
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{{FamilySearch_Collection|CID=CID1610550 |title=England, Cheshire Non-conformist records, 1671-1900|location=England}}<br>  
|location=United Kingdom
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|CID=CID1610550
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|title=England, Cheshire Non-conformist records, 1671-1900}}<br>
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== Collection Time Period  ==
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Nonconformist church registers began in the 1500s. Some registers continue to the present.
+
  
 
== Record Description  ==
 
== Record Description  ==
 +
 +
This Collection will include records from 1671 to 1900.<br>
  
 
Nonconformist registers were recorded in volumes of varying size and format. Nonconformist church registers cover approximately 15 percent of England’s population and 80 percent of Wales’ population after 1850.  
 
Nonconformist registers were recorded in volumes of varying size and format. Nonconformist church registers cover approximately 15 percent of England’s population and 80 percent of Wales’ population after 1850.  
  
=== Record Content  ===
+
A Nonconformist church was one that disagreed with the Church of England (Anglican). They may have disagreed with its rites of worship, opposed its authority, or objected to it being heavily supported and subsidized by the government. The better-known Nonconformist groups were Independents (Congregationalists), Baptists, Presbyterians (including Scots Congregations), Methodists, Roman Catholics, Society of Friends (Quakers), Brethren Church, Jews, French Huguenots (Walloons), and Mormons (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints). Roman Catholics and Jews trace their heritage back to earlier eras. Baptists, Presbyterians, Independents, and French Huguenots all had their beginnings in the 16th century. The others were established in the 18th and 19th centuries.  
<gallery caption="Bristol Nonconformist Church Records" widths="160px" heights="120px" perrow="3">
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Image:England Nonconformist Baptist Baptism.jpg|Baptist Baptism Record
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Few Nonconformist registers exist before 1700 because of persecution. By the late 1700s or early 1800s, many denominations had started keeping registers. Some were better at keeping records than others. The denominations usually did not have a formal hierarchy, so the records were kept on a local level. However, some denominations did form central registries. The Presbyterians, Baptisms, and Independents (Congregationalists) established central birth registration in 1743; and the Methodists did so in 1773.  
Image:England Nonconformist Baptist Burial.jpg|Baptist Burial Record
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Image:England Nonconformist Catholic Baptism.jpg|Catholic Baptism Record
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Some of the births, baptisms, marriages, and burials for Nonconformists were recorded in Anglican registers. Between 1695 and 1705, Anglican ministers were required to register the births of any children in their parish who were not baptized. Even though many Anglican ministers ignored this act, some Nonconformists’ births were recorded this way. And some Nonconformists’ children were even baptized in Anglican parishes. By law, marriages after 1754 were required to take place in Anglican parish churches and be recorded in their registers. Nonconformists were often buried in Anglican churchyards because there were no other burial grounds until the early 1850s, when civil cemeteries opened. Sometimes Nonconformists’ burials were recorded in both Anglican and Nonconformist registers. Huguenots often left their recording to the Church of England. Until the end of the 19th century, some Methodists let the Church of England record their baptisms and burials. Nonconformist church registers cover approximately 15 percent of England’s population and 80 percent of Wales’ population after 1850.  
Image:England Nonconformist Friends Birth.jpg|Friends Birth Record
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Image:England Nonconformist Friends Marriage.jpg|Friends Marriags Record
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Nonconformist church registers began in the 1500s. Some registers continue to the present.&nbsp;
Image:England Nonconformist Independent.jpg|Independent Birth and Death Record
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Image:England Nonconformist Jew.jpg|Jewish Birth Record
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Nonconformist church registers were created to record births, baptisms, confirmations, marriages, and burials or deaths.  
Image:England Nonconformist Presbyterian.jpg|Presbyterian Birth and Burial Record
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</gallery>
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Nonconformist church registers are the most reliable and accurate family history source until 1837, when England’s civil registration began.  
 +
 
 +
=== Citation for This Collection  ===
 +
 
 +
The following citation refers to the original source of the information published in FamilySearch.org Historical Records collections. Sources include the author, custodian, publisher, and archive for the original records.
 +
 
 +
{{Collection citation | text= "England, Cheshire Non-conformist Records, 1671-1900." Index. <i>FamilySearch</i>. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2013. Citing Record Office, Chester.}}
 +
 
 +
This collection contains 67 reels of FHL microfilm.  
 +
 
 +
[[England Cheshire Non-Conformist Church Records (FamilySearch Historical Records)#Citation_Example_for_a_Record_Found_in_This_Collection|Suggested citation format for a record in this collection.]]
 +
 
 +
== Record Content  ==
 +
 
 +
Birth records may contain the following information:
 +
 
 +
*Name of child
 +
*Date of baptism
 +
*Place of baptism
 +
*Gender of child
 +
*Names of parents
 +
 
 +
Marriage records may contain the following information:
 +
 
 +
*Name of groom and bride
 +
*Place of marriage
 +
*Date of marriage
 +
*Name of groom's parents
 +
*Name of bride's parents
 +
 
 +
Burial records may contain the following information:
 +
 
 +
*Name of deceased
 +
*Place of burial
 +
*Date of burial
 +
*Age
 +
*Gender
 +
*Marital status
  
 
Nonconformist birth and baptismal registers will sometimes contain more information than those of the Church of England. They often list the person’s birth date, baptismal date father’s name and residence, and mother’s name (including maiden name).  
 
Nonconformist birth and baptismal registers will sometimes contain more information than those of the Church of England. They often list the person’s birth date, baptismal date father’s name and residence, and mother’s name (including maiden name).  
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== How to Use the Record  ==
 
== How to Use the Record  ==
  
To search for a person in a nonconformist church's records, you must know the following:  
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To search for a person in a nonconformist church's records, it would be helpful if you knew the following information:  
  
 
*Where the person lived  
 
*Where the person lived  
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*When the person lived; if you do not know the time period, you must estimate it from what you know of more recent generations.
 
*When the person lived; if you do not know the time period, you must estimate it from what you know of more recent generations.
  
When you have located your ancestor’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors. Add this new information to your records of each family. For example:
+
==== Search the Collection  ====
  
*Use the parent’s names along with the child’s birth date and place as the basis for compiling a new family group or for verifying existing information.  
+
Fill in the requested information in the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about the ancestors in the list to what you already know about your ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person. You may need to look at several images and compare the information about the individuals listed in those images to your ancestors to make this determination.
 +
 
 +
For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line video at [http://broadcast.lds.org/familysearch/2011-12-03-familysearch-search-tips-1000k-eng.mp4 FamilySearch Search Tips].
 +
 
 +
==== Using the Information  ====
 +
 
 +
When you have located your ancestor’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors. Add this new information to your records of each family.
 +
 
 +
For example:
 +
 
 +
*Use the parents' names along with the child’s birth date and place as the basis for compiling a new family group or for verifying existing information.  
 
*Use the birth date along with the place of birth to find the family in census records.  
 
*Use the birth date along with the place of birth to find the family in census records.  
*Use the residence and names of the parents to locate probate and tax records.  
+
*Use the residence and names of the parents to locate probate and tax records.<br>
*Occupations listed can lead you to employment records or other types of records such as military records.
+
 
*The name of the officiator may be a clue to their religion or area of residence in the county.  
 
*The name of the officiator may be a clue to their religion or area of residence in the county.  
*Compile the entries for every person who has the same surname as the bride or groom, this is especially helpful in rural areas or if the surname is unusual.  
+
*Compile the entries for every person who has the same surname as the bride or groom; this is especially helpful in rural areas or if the surname is unusual.  
 
*Continue to search the records to identify children, siblings, parents, and other relatives who may have been born, married, or died in the same county or nearby. This can help you identify other generations of your family or even the second marriage of a parent. Repeat this process for each new generation you identify.  
 
*Continue to search the records to identify children, siblings, parents, and other relatives who may have been born, married, or died in the same county or nearby. This can help you identify other generations of your family or even the second marriage of a parent. Repeat this process for each new generation you identify.  
*When looking for a person who had a common name, look at all the entries for the name before deciding which is correct.
+
*When looking for a person who had a common name, look at all the entries for the name before deciding which is correct.
 +
*Sometimes the groom’s occupation is listed, which could help you find more records about the groom. Marriage records after 1754 list the names of witnesses, who were often family members.
  
Keep in mind:
+
==== Tips to Keep in Mind  ====
  
 
*Earlier records may not contain as much information as the records created after the late 1900.  
 
*Earlier records may not contain as much information as the records created after the late 1900.  
 
*There is also some variation in the information given from one marriage record to another record.
 
*There is also some variation in the information given from one marriage record to another record.
 +
 +
==== Unable to Find your Ancestor?  ====
  
 
If you are unable to find the ancestors you are looking for, try the following:  
 
If you are unable to find the ancestors you are looking for, try the following:  
Line 58: Line 102:
 
*Search the indexes and records of nearby counties.
 
*Search the indexes and records of nearby counties.
  
== Record History ==
+
== Related Websites ==
  
A Nonconformist church was one that disagreed with the Church of England (Anglican). They may have disagreed with its rites of worship, opposed its authority, or objected to it being heavily supported and subsidized by the government. The better-known Nonconformist groups were Independents (Congregationalists), Baptists, Presbyterians (including Scots Congregations), Methodists, Roman Catholics, Society of Friends (Quakers), Brethren Church, Jews, French Huguenots (Walloons), and Mormons (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints). Roman Catholics and Jews trace their heritage back to earlier eras. Baptists, Presbyterians, Independents, and French Huguenots all had their beginnings in the 16th century. The others were established in the 18th and 19th centuries.
+
[http://www.coraweb.com.au/uksites.htm United Kingdom - England: Societies and Resources]
 
+
Few Nonconformist registers exist before 1700 because of persecution. By the late 1700s or early 1800s, many denominations had started keeping registers. Some were better at keeping records than others. The denominations usually did not have a formal hierarchy, so the records were kept on a local level. However, some denominations did form central registries. The Presbyterians, Baptisms, and Independents (Congregationalists) established central birth registration in 1743; and the Methodists did so in 1773.
+
 
+
Some of the births, baptisms, marriages, and burials for Nonconformists were recorded in Anglican registers. Between 1695 and 1705, Anglican ministers were required to register the births of any children in their parish who were not baptized. Even though many Anglican ministers ignored this act, some Nonconformists’ births were recorded this way. And some Nonconformists’ children were even baptized in Anglican parishes. By law, marriages after 1754 were required to take place in Anglican parish churches and be recorded in their registers. Nonconformists were often buried in Anglican churchyards because there were no other burial grounds until the early 1850s, when civil cemeteries opened. Sometimes Nonconformists’ burials were recorded in both Anglican and Nonconformist registers. Huguenots often left their recording to the Church of England. Until the end of the 19th century, some Methodists let the Church of England record their baptisms and burials. Nonconformist church registers cover approximately 15 percent of England’s population and 80 percent of Wales’ population after 1850.
+
 
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=== Why This Record Was Created  ===
+
 
+
Nonconformist church registers were created to record births, baptisms, confirmations, marriages, and burials or deaths.
+
 
+
=== Record Reliability  ===
+
 
+
Nonconformist church registers are the most reliable and accurate family history source until 1837, when England’s civil registration began.
+
 
+
== Related Web Sites  ==
+
 
+
This section of the article is incomplete. You can help FamilySearch Wiki by supplying links to related websites here.
+
  
 
== Related Wiki Articles  ==
 
== Related Wiki Articles  ==
  
[[England Church Records]]  
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*[[Cheshire]]
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*[[England]]
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*[[England Church Records]]
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*[[Quick Research Links - England]]
  
=== Contributions to This Article  ===
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== Contributions to This Article  ==
  
{{Contributor invite}}  
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{{Contributor_invite}}  
 
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== Sources of Information for This Collection of This Collection  ==
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<!--bibdescbegin-->“England, Cheshire, Non-conformist Records 1671-1900,” database, FamilySearch; 2009, from Cheshire Record Office. Cheshire Non-conformist Church Records (multiple titles by sect). Cheshire Record Office, Chester (England), Chester. FHL microfilm, 67 reels. Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. <!--bibdescend-->
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== Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections  ==
 
== Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections  ==
  
When you copy information from a record, you should also list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.  
+
When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.  
 
+
A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the Wiki Article: [[How to Cite FamilySearch Collections|How to Cite FamilySearch Collections]].
+
 
+
=== Examples of Source Citations for a Record in This Collection  ===
+
 
+
Please add sample citations to this article following the format guidelines in the wiki article listed above.
+
 
+
=== Examples of Source Citations for a Record in This Collection:  ===
+
  
*United States. Bureau of the Census. 12th census, 1900, digital images, From FamilySearch Internet([http://www.familysearch,org www.familysearch,org]: September 29, 2006). Arizona Territory, Maricopa, Township 1, East Gila, Salt River Base adn Meridian; sheet 9B, line 71.
+
A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article [[Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections]].  
*Mexico, Districto Federal, Catholic Church Records, 1886-1933, digital images, from Familysearch Internet ([http://www.familysearch,org www.familysearch,org]: April 22, 2010), Bapistm of Adolfo Femandex Jimenez, 1 Feb. 1910, San Pedro Apostol, Cauhimalpa, Districto Federal, Mexico, film number 0227023
+
  
[[Category:Cheshire|onconformist Church Records]]
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[[Category:Cheshire|Nonconformist Church Records]]

Revision as of 20:28, 26 August 2013

FamilySearch Record Search This article describes a collection of historical records available at FamilySearch.org.

Contents

Record Description

This Collection will include records from 1671 to 1900.

Nonconformist registers were recorded in volumes of varying size and format. Nonconformist church registers cover approximately 15 percent of England’s population and 80 percent of Wales’ population after 1850.

A Nonconformist church was one that disagreed with the Church of England (Anglican). They may have disagreed with its rites of worship, opposed its authority, or objected to it being heavily supported and subsidized by the government. The better-known Nonconformist groups were Independents (Congregationalists), Baptists, Presbyterians (including Scots Congregations), Methodists, Roman Catholics, Society of Friends (Quakers), Brethren Church, Jews, French Huguenots (Walloons), and Mormons (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints). Roman Catholics and Jews trace their heritage back to earlier eras. Baptists, Presbyterians, Independents, and French Huguenots all had their beginnings in the 16th century. The others were established in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Few Nonconformist registers exist before 1700 because of persecution. By the late 1700s or early 1800s, many denominations had started keeping registers. Some were better at keeping records than others. The denominations usually did not have a formal hierarchy, so the records were kept on a local level. However, some denominations did form central registries. The Presbyterians, Baptisms, and Independents (Congregationalists) established central birth registration in 1743; and the Methodists did so in 1773.

Some of the births, baptisms, marriages, and burials for Nonconformists were recorded in Anglican registers. Between 1695 and 1705, Anglican ministers were required to register the births of any children in their parish who were not baptized. Even though many Anglican ministers ignored this act, some Nonconformists’ births were recorded this way. And some Nonconformists’ children were even baptized in Anglican parishes. By law, marriages after 1754 were required to take place in Anglican parish churches and be recorded in their registers. Nonconformists were often buried in Anglican churchyards because there were no other burial grounds until the early 1850s, when civil cemeteries opened. Sometimes Nonconformists’ burials were recorded in both Anglican and Nonconformist registers. Huguenots often left their recording to the Church of England. Until the end of the 19th century, some Methodists let the Church of England record their baptisms and burials. Nonconformist church registers cover approximately 15 percent of England’s population and 80 percent of Wales’ population after 1850.

Nonconformist church registers began in the 1500s. Some registers continue to the present. 

Nonconformist church registers were created to record births, baptisms, confirmations, marriages, and burials or deaths.

Nonconformist church registers are the most reliable and accurate family history source until 1837, when England’s civil registration began.

Citation for This Collection

The following citation refers to the original source of the information published in FamilySearch.org Historical Records collections. Sources include the author, custodian, publisher, and archive for the original records.

"England, Cheshire Non-conformist Records, 1671-1900." Index. FamilySearch. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2013. Citing Record Office, Chester.

This collection contains 67 reels of FHL microfilm.

Suggested citation format for a record in this collection.

Record Content

Birth records may contain the following information:

  • Name of child
  • Date of baptism
  • Place of baptism
  • Gender of child
  • Names of parents

Marriage records may contain the following information:

  • Name of groom and bride
  • Place of marriage
  • Date of marriage
  • Name of groom's parents
  • Name of bride's parents

Burial records may contain the following information:

  • Name of deceased
  • Place of burial
  • Date of burial
  • Age
  • Gender
  • Marital status

Nonconformist birth and baptismal registers will sometimes contain more information than those of the Church of England. They often list the person’s birth date, baptismal date father’s name and residence, and mother’s name (including maiden name).

They rarely contain marriage records (except for the Quakers and Jews), especially from 1754 to 1837. They contain some burial entries, though Nonconformists were usually buried in Anglican churchyards until the Nonconformist chapel obtained its own burial grounds or the civil cemeteries opened.

How to Use the Record

To search for a person in a nonconformist church's records, it would be helpful if you knew the following information:

  • Where the person lived
  • Their denomination or sect
  • When the person lived; if you do not know the time period, you must estimate it from what you know of more recent generations.

Search the Collection

Fill in the requested information in the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about the ancestors in the list to what you already know about your ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person. You may need to look at several images and compare the information about the individuals listed in those images to your ancestors to make this determination.

For tips about searching on-line collections see the on-line video at FamilySearch Search Tips.

Using the Information

When you have located your ancestor’s record, carefully evaluate each piece of information given. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors. Add this new information to your records of each family.

For example:

  • Use the parents' names along with the child’s birth date and place as the basis for compiling a new family group or for verifying existing information.
  • Use the birth date along with the place of birth to find the family in census records.
  • Use the residence and names of the parents to locate probate and tax records.
  • The name of the officiator may be a clue to their religion or area of residence in the county.
  • Compile the entries for every person who has the same surname as the bride or groom; this is especially helpful in rural areas or if the surname is unusual.
  • Continue to search the records to identify children, siblings, parents, and other relatives who may have been born, married, or died in the same county or nearby. This can help you identify other generations of your family or even the second marriage of a parent. Repeat this process for each new generation you identify.
  • When looking for a person who had a common name, look at all the entries for the name before deciding which is correct.
  • Sometimes the groom’s occupation is listed, which could help you find more records about the groom. Marriage records after 1754 list the names of witnesses, who were often family members.

Tips to Keep in Mind

  • Earlier records may not contain as much information as the records created after the late 1900.
  • There is also some variation in the information given from one marriage record to another record.

Unable to Find your Ancestor?

If you are unable to find the ancestors you are looking for, try the following:

  • Check for variant spellings of the surnames.
  • Check for a different index. There are often indexes at the beginning of each volume.
  • Search the indexes and records of nearby counties.

Related Websites

United Kingdom - England: Societies and Resources

Related Wiki Articles

Contributions to This Article

We welcome user additions to FamilySearch Historical Records wiki articles. Guidelines are available to help you make changes. Thank you for any contributions you may provide. If you would like to get more involved join the WikiProject FamilySearch Records.

Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections

When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.

A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections.