England Research Guidance: Births, 1837-Present

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Civil registration is the government registration of births, marriages, and deaths, beginning 1 July 1837. In these records you may find a child's name, birth date and place, names of parents (including mother's maiden name), father's occupation, and the name, address, and sometimes the relationship of a person present at the birth. Civil registration birth records cover most of the population and are indexed countrywide. Use the national index to identify and obtain a copy of a birth certificate.<br>  
 
Civil registration is the government registration of births, marriages, and deaths, beginning 1 July 1837. In these records you may find a child's name, birth date and place, names of parents (including mother's maiden name), father's occupation, and the name, address, and sometimes the relationship of a person present at the birth. Civil registration birth records cover most of the population and are indexed countrywide. Use the national index to identify and obtain a copy of a birth certificate.<br>  
  
For more information, see [[England Civil Registration]].  
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For more information, see [[England Civil Registration]].
  
 
==== 2. Marriage Certificate: Civil registration  ====
 
==== 2. Marriage Certificate: Civil registration  ====

Revision as of 15:34, 4 March 2013

England Gotoarrow.png English Birth, Christening or Baptism Date Gotoarrow.png England_Research_Guidance:_Births,_1837-Present 

Contents

England | Birth | 1837-Present

Search Strategies

Search the following records in the order listed, if applicable to your research problem. As a researcher, ask yourself these questions:

Why go to the next record
You may want to go to the next record because:
1. You did not find any information in the above record.
2. You found information, but it conflicts with what you know.
3. You found information but would like to find additional details.

1. Birth Certificate: Civil registration

Civil registration is the government registration of births, marriages, and deaths, beginning 1 July 1837. In these records you may find a child's name, birth date and place, names of parents (including mother's maiden name), father's occupation, and the name, address, and sometimes the relationship of a person present at the birth. Civil registration birth records cover most of the population and are indexed countrywide. Use the national index to identify and obtain a copy of a birth certificate.

For more information, see England Civil Registration.

2. Marriage Certificate: Civil registration

Civil registration is the government registration of births, marriages, and deaths, beginning 1 July 1837. In these records you may find names, ages (which you can use to determine a year of birth), marital status, fathers' names and occupations, the occupations and residences of the bride and groom, and names of witnesses. You must purchase a copy of a marriage certificate to see the information in the original record. Civil registration marriage records cover most of the population and are indexed countrywide. Use the national index to identify and obtain a copy of a marriage certificate.

For more information, see England Civil Registration.

3. Death Certificate: Civil registration

Civil registration is the government registration of births, marriages, and deaths, beginning 1 July 1837. In these records you may find the name of the deceased, death date and place, age at death (which you can use to determine the year of birth), occupation (or in the case of a child, a parent's name), cause of death, and the name, address, and sometimes relationship of a person present at the death. Civil registration death records cover most of the population and are indexed countrywide. Use the national index to identify and obtain a copy of a death certificate.

For more information, see England Civil Registration.

4. Census: Census

A census is a count and description of the population. Government census records are especially valuable because they list the majority of the population and are readily available at many repositories. In these records you may find names of the members of a household, gender, marital status, relationship to the head of the household, age, address, occupation, and birthplace.

For more information, see England Census Records.

5. Church Records: Church records

Church records are parish, chapel, or congregation registers created by church authorities. They contain baptisms or christenings, marriages, and burials. In these records you may find names and dates and places of births or christenings, marriages, and burials. In the absence of a birth date, use a christening or baptism date.

For more information, see England Church Records.

6. Family History: Genealogy

The term family history describes a variety of records containing personal and family information gathered by researchers, societies, or archives. These records can include published family histories, pedigree charts, family group records, research notes on families, correspondence, ancestor lists, research exchange files, record abstracts, and collections of original or copied documents. Family histories can be excellent sources of information that can save you valuable research time. Because these records are compiled from a variety of sources, the information must be carefully evaluated and verified for accuracy. Internet genealogy sites can be helpful in researching a specific family name. If your ancestor emigrated from another country, look for more information in his or her country of birth.

For more information, see England Genealogy.

7. Military Records: Military records

Military records identify individuals who served in the army and navy. Other branches of the armed forces, which include militia, coast guard, and royal marines, also kept records. In these records you may find a name, age, regiment name or number, name of ship, date and place of birth, names of parents, and marriage information. The records may provide information not found in any other source.

Military records include description books, soldiers' documents, regimental registers, returns of service, muster rolls and pay lists, continuous service engagement books, and chaplains' returns. You must know the regiment that your ancestor belonged to or the ship on which he served to find most military records.

For more information, see England Military Records.

8. Occupational Records: Occupations

Occupational records provide information on a person's employment or training for a craft, trade, or profession. Knowing a person's occupation can distinguish him or her from other individuals with the same name. Occupational records may include name, age, residence, sometimes father's or widow's name, and other information about a person's life and family. Some types of occupational records are apprenticeship and freemen records; trade, guild, or livery records; and histories of occupations.

For more information, see England Occupations.

9. Probate Records, Pre-1858: Probate records

Probate records are court records dealing with the distribution of a person's estate after death. Before January 1858, Church of England courts had the responsibility to prove wills and other probate records. In these records you may find names and relationships. Probate records include wills, testaments, administrations (admons), inventories, codicils, act books, and bonds. 

For more information, see England Probate Records. Also see the WIki article for a county of interest and the topic of Probate Records.

10. Probate Records, 1858 to Present: Probate records

Probate records are court records dealing with the distribution of a person's estate after death. Beginning in January 1858, government courts had the responsibility to prove wills and other probate records. In these records you may find names and relationships.

Probate records include wills, administrations (admons), and inventories.

For more information, see England Probate Records. Also see the Wiki article for the Principal Probate Registry.

11. Cemetery Records: Cemeteries

Cemetery records are kept by sextons, administrators, or trustees of a private or municipal cemetery. In these records you may find the name and age of the deceased, date and place of birth, and names of parents. This information may lead you to a birth record.

Types of cemetery records include burial and cremation registers, monumental inscriptions, and burial plot maps. These records may help you identify family members buried nearby. They may provide clues that lead you to other records.

Verify information found in cemetery records. Look for cemetery records on a county, parish, and city or town level. Search for indexes first. 

For more information, see England Cemeteries.

12. Monumental Inscriptions/Church Monuments: Cemeteries

Monumental inscriptions and church monuments are memorials to persons who have died. Monumental inscriptions are engraved on stones placed at the graves of deceased persons. They are commonly found on headstones, tombstones, gravestones, or plaques, depending on the area. Inscriptions may include the deceased's name and age, dates, and names of relatives.

Church monuments are memorials to wealthy, noble, royal, or other distinguished people. They are often a brass plaque, stone statue, or effigy placed inside the church or on church grounds. Information on church monuments may include only names and dates.

You can access the information on monumental inscriptions and church monuments through printed transcriptions or by visiting the church. Verify information from monumental inscriptions and church monuments.

For more information, see England Cemeteries.

13. Newspapers: Newspapers

Newspapers are published accounts of current events in a given area. Newspaper articles, notices, and community news items may provide information about births, marriages, and deaths. In these records you may find ages; dates and places of births, marriages, or deaths; and names of relatives. Large public or university libraries or libraries specializing in newspapers may help you locate the newspaper from your ancestor's area.

For more information, see England Newspapers.

14. Biography: Biography

A biography is a history of a person's life. A biography may provide an individual's date and place of birth and names of parents, as well as other details. Look for biographies in biographical dictionaries and encyclopedias, society journals, periodicals, and local histories. Verify information in biographical sources.

For more information, see England Biography.

15. School and Alumni Records: Schools

School and alumni records are lists of individuals who attended a school, college, or university. In these records you may find name, age, date and place of birth, residence, father's name and occupation, marriage information, and other biographical details. School records list teachers, students, and graduates.

For more information, see England Schools.

16. Poor Law Records: Poorhouses, poor law, etc.

Poor law records deal with the care of the poor. In these records you may find names, birth dates and places, marriage information, name of spouse, parents' names, death or burial information, and the parish where the family lived. Poor law records include churchwarden accounts, rate books, settlement certificates, removal orders, examinations, bastardy bonds, guardianship, and apprenticeship records. These records were created on a parish level before 1834 and on county and poor law union levels beginning in 1834.

For more information, see England Poorhouses, Poor Law, etc.

17. Quarter Sessions: Court records

Court records are government documents concerning civil matters. Most court records name people who were defendants, plaintiffs, jurors, or witnesses. In these records you may find a person's residence, occupation, physical description, family relationships, name of spouse, and some death and marriage information. Court records seldom provide birth information but may give ages.

Quarter sessions were the county circuit courts which were held quarterly.

Use court records after you have searched other records. Court records tend to be difficult to use because the handwriting is hard to read and they include unfamiliar legal terms.

For more information, see England Court Records.


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