FamilySearch Indexing: US—1940 Federal Census, OverviewEdit This Page

From FamilySearch Wiki

Revision as of 17:38, 4 April 2012 by PearsonGB (Talk | contribs)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
FamilySearch Indexing: US—1940 Federal Census, OverviewFamilySearch Indexing: US—1940 Federal Census, Project UpdatesFamilySearch Indexing: US—1940 Federal Census, Additional HelpsFamilySearch Indexing: US—1940 Federal Census, Project LinksFSI Tabs Overview.jpg
 

About This Project

Beginning in 1790, a federal census has been taken in the United States at the beginning of each decade. Census records are released to the public 72 years after the census was taken. The 1940 U.S. Federal Census, released this year, is the largest and most comprehensive collection available containing information about those who were living in the United States at the time. The 1940 census included standard questions about the names, races, ages, and birthplaces of respondents and the people in their households. It also included additional questions about education, income and occupation, and where people lived five years before the census was taken.

Sample Images

Skill Level: Beginning

  • This project is recommended for new volunteers who are still becoming familiar with the indexing process and system.

Characteristics and Description

  • The census was handwritten on printed forms.
  • This project includes several types of forms. The primary or standard form was the Population Schedule.
  • Each batch contains only one image, and each image shows one census form.
  • Each form usually contains 40 records.

Access Restriction

  • The completed index and digital images will be freely accessible to the general public on FamilySearch.org and partner websites.

Additional Information


 

Need additional research help? Contact our research help specialists.

Need wiki, indexing, or website help? Contact our product teams.


Did you find this article helpful?

You're invited to explain your rating on the discussion page (you must be signed in).